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Life Sciences - Psychology - 18.10.2020
Malice leaves a nasty smell
Malice leaves a nasty smell
Bad attitudes lead to moral judgments rooted in our basic survival mechanisms. And scientists from the University of Geneva have demonstrated that they are linked to foul smells. Unhealthy behaviours trigger moral judgments that are similar to the basic emotions that contribute to our ability to survive.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.10.2020
Early Trauma Influences Metabolism Across Generations
Early Trauma Influences Metabolism Across Generations
A study by the Brain Research Institute at UZH reveals that early trauma leads to changes in blood metabolites - similarly in mice and humans. Experiments with mice have show that these potentially harmful effects on health are also passed to the next generation. The researchers have identified a biological mechanism by which traumatic experiences become embedded in germ cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.10.2020
Cells on the run
Cells on the run
Many cells in the body must pass through tissue, which sometimes requires them to get out of tight corners. An international research team co-led by ETH Zurich has now examined how cells recognise and escape from such bottlenecks. Among the results of the team's work are new pointers for how to improve immunotherapy.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.10.2020
Scientists home in on how cells are protected from premature aging
Scientists home in on how cells are protected from premature aging
A new study by EPFL researchers shows how RNA species called TERRA muster at the tip of chromosomes, where they help to prevent telomere shortening and premature cell aging. Molecules that accumulate at the tip of chromosomes are known to play a key role in preventing damage to our DNA. Now, researchers at EPFL have unraveled how these molecules home in on specific sections of chromosomes-a finding that could help to better understand the processes that regulate cell survival in aging and cancer.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.10.2020
Mechanical forces of biofilms could play role in infections
Studying bacterial biofilms, EPFL scientists have discovered that mechanical forces within them are sufficient to deform the soft material they grow on, e.g. biological tissues, suggesting a -mechanical- mode of bacterial infection. The vast majority of bacteria in the world live on surfaces by forming structures called -biofilms-.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 09.10.2020
Bacteria in sediment continue to show effects of over-fertilisation
Bacteria in sediment continue to show effects of over-fertilisation
Whether a lake was once polluted with excess nutrients is reflected even decades later in the community of bacteria living on these nutrients in the sediment. However, there is still surprisingly little research into how microbes in the sediment cooperate. From a global perspective, lake sediments are important carbon sinks.

Life Sciences - 08.10.2020
Miniature organs shed light on intestinal regeneration
Miniature organs shed light on intestinal regeneration
In a study, researchers from Basel unraveled mechanisms orchestrating organoid formation and intestinal regeneration. Using a unique image-based screening approach, the researchers identified a compound that improves intestinal regeneration in mice. The last decade has seen a boom in the field of organoids, miniature organs grown from stem cells in vitro.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 08.10.2020
Intestinal regeneration: lessons from organoid research
Intestinal regeneration: lessons from organoid research
Intestinal organoids recapitulate not only the structure of intestinal epithelium but also its ability to regenerate following damage. Using this research tool, the group of Prisca Liberali unraveled mechanisms orchestrating organoid formation and intestinal regeneration with a unique image-based screening approach.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 05.10.2020
Millimetre-precision drug delivery to the brain
Millimetre-precision drug delivery to the brain
Focused ultrasound waves help ETH researchers to deliver drugs to the brain with pinpoint accuracy, in other words only to where their effect is desired. This method is set to enable treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders and tumours with fewer side effects in the future. Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a method for concentrating and releasing drugs in the brain with pinpoint accuracy.

Life Sciences - 02.10.2020
Woodpeckers' Drumming: Conserved Meaning Despite Different Structure over the Years
Woodpeckers’ Drumming: Conserved Meaning Despite Different Structure over the Years
How do animals produce and perceive biological information in sounds? To what extent does the acoustic structure and its associated meaning change during evolution? An international team led by the University of Zurich and the University of Saint-Etienne reconstructed the evolutionary history of an animal communication system, focusing on drumming signals of woodpeckers.

Life Sciences - 29.09.2020
Understanding the effect of aging on the genome
Scientists have measured the molecular footprint that aging leaves on various mouse and human tissues. Using the data, they have identified likely regulators of this central process. Time may be our worst enemy, and aging its most powerful weapon. Our hair turns grey, our strength wanes, and a slew of age-related diseases represent what is happening at the cellular and molecular levels.

Life Sciences - 28.09.2020
Inside mitochondria and their fascinating genome
Inside mitochondria and their fascinating genome
Scientists have observed - for the first time in living cells - the way mitochondria distribute their transcriptome throughout the cell, and it involves RNA granules that turn out to be highly fluid. Mitochondria are present in all eukaryotic cells: in our cells, in mammalian cells, in the cells of plants and even of fungi.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.09.2020
Recording thousands of nerve cell impulses at high resolution
Recording thousands of nerve cell impulses at high resolution
Researchers have developed a new generation of microelectrode-array chips for measuring nerve impulses, enabling studies of how thousands of nerve cells interact with each other. For over 15 years, ETH Professor Andreas Hierlemann and his group have been developing microelectrode-array chips that can be used to precisely excite nerve cells in cell cultures and to measure electrical cell activity.

Environment - Life Sciences - 24.09.2020
Marine heatwaves are human made
Marine heatwaves are human made
Heatwaves in the world's oceans have become over 20 times more frequent due to human influence. This is what researchers from the Oeschger Centre for Climate Research at the University of Bern are now able to prove. Marine heatwaves destroy ecosystems and damage fisheries. A marine heatwave (ocean heatwave) is an extended period of time in which the water temperature in a particular ocean region is abnormally high.

Electroengineering - Life Sciences - 24.09.2020
Microelectronics shed light on neural behaviour
Microelectronics shed light on neural behaviour
Researchers at ETH Zurich - in collaboration with colleagues from EPFL in Lausanne and Harvard Medical School - have developed a system that allows them to optically stimulate individual nerve fibres in living mice. Through this process, they have demonstrated that the nervous system has a direct influence on the immune system.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.09.2020
Researchers develop new method to print tiny, functional organs
Researchers develop new method to print tiny, functional organs
Researchers at EPFL have developed an approach to print tiny tissues that look and function almost like their full-sized counterpart. Measuring just a few centimeters across, the mini-tissues could allow scientists to study biological processes-and even test new treatment approaches-in ways that were previously not possible.

Life Sciences - 24.09.2020
Histone degradation after DNA damage enhances repair
Histone degradation after DNA damage enhances repair
DNA damage can occur anywhere in the genome, but most DNA is wrapped around nucleosomes making it inaccessible to the repair machinery. Researchers from the Gasser group now show that DNA damage induces histone depletion, which increases the accessibility and flexibility of the DNA fiber and enhances the rate of homology search during repair by homologous recombination.

Life Sciences - Sport - 23.09.2020
Sport and memory go hand in hand
Sport and memory go hand in hand
By exploring the benefits of sport in memory and motor learning, scientists from the University of Geneva are opening up promising perspectives for school programmes and in the prevention of Alzheimer's disease. After an intensive sports session, the memory performance are much better. @DR  If sport is good for the body, it also seems to be good for the brain.

Environment - Life Sciences - 21.09.2020
Biodiversity hypothesis called into question
Biodiversity hypothesis called into question
The trade-off between gleaners and exploiters does not explain the diversity of biological species in the way that scientists expected. Our understanding of biodiversity has to change. Aquatic organisms - and terrestrial ones - that do best when there is lots of food also do best when there is very little .

Life Sciences - Health - 21.09.2020
A link between sensory neurons activation and the immune system
A link between sensory neurons activation and the immune system
Scientists at EPFL, ETH Zurich and Harvard Medical School/Boston Children's Hospital have developed an implantable technology that enabled the discovery of an interaction between sensory neurons and immune cells. Pain is a protective mechanism, alerting us to danger by generating an unpleasant sensation.