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Medicine/Pharmacology



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Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
18.08.2017
Bacteria stab amoebae with daggers
Bacteria stab amoebae with daggers
Researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Vienna have discovered a type of bacteria that uses tiny daggers to prevent itself from being eaten by amoebae. The scientists also resolved the three-dimensional structure of the mechanism that allows the micro-daggers to be shot quickly. Bacteria have to watch out for amoeba.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
08.08.2017
Multi-nutrient rice against malnutrition
Multi-nutrient rice against malnutrition
ETH researchers have developed a new rice variety that not only has increased levels of the micronutrients iron and zinc in the grains, but also produces beta-carotene as a precursor of vitamin A&per
Physics/Materials Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
07.08.2017
Big issues around small particles
Big issues around small particles
An Empa team has succeeded in developing a new three-dimensional cell model of the human placental barrier. The "model organ" can quickly and reliably deliver new information on the intake of substances, such as nano-particles, by the placental barrier and on any possible toxic effects for the unborn child.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Business/Economics
03.08.2017
Cultural factors account for cost differences at the end of life
Cultural factors account for cost differences at the end of life
In their final year of life, on average men cause more healthcare costs than women. Dying is more expensive in the Frenchand Italian-speaking parts of Switzerland than in the German-speaking part. These are the findings of an analysis of health insurance data that was conducted as part of the National Research Programme "End of life" (NRP 67).
Medicine/Pharmacology
02.08.2017
Fighting dehydration with wearables and big data
Fighting dehydration with wearables and big data
Dehydration is one of the most common causes of death among young children in the developing world - particularly during the hot summer months.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
31.07.2017
Cell senescence is regulated by innate DNA sensing
Cell senescence is regulated by innate DNA sensing
EPFL scientists have made new insights into the control of cell senescence, which is intimately linked to the development of cancer and ageing. Cells in the body or in cultures eventually stop replicating. This phenomenon is called "senescence" and is triggered by shortening of telomeres, oxidative stress or genetic damage to the cells, either acute or simply due to the cell growing "old".
Medicine/Pharmacology
26.07.2017
Body ownership is not impaired in schizophrenia
Body ownership is not impaired in schizophrenia
Answering a long-standing question, EPFL scientists have determined that the sense of body ownership is not affected in schizophrenia patients. Image: In the Full Body Illusion participants view their own backs being stroked, and when the seen and perceived stroking is synchronous a bodily illusion occurs causing them to feel illusory ownership over the viewed body.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
25.07.2017
Shedding Light on Cause of Resistance to Tumor Immunotherapy
Shedding Light on Cause of Resistance to Tumor Immunotherapy
Cancer is the second most common cause of death worldwide. Until recently, the chances of cure for patients suffering from metastatic cancer were low, as with such cancer the surgical removal of dista
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
24.07.2017
A toolbox for creating new drugs
A toolbox for creating new drugs
ETH microbiologists led by Markus Künzler have discovered a remarkable enzyme in a fungus. They now want to use it to develop new drugs.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
19.07.2017
Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Can Exacerbate Colitis
Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Can Exacerbate Colitis
The frequency of inflammatory bowel disease like Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis has been on the rise in many Western countries for decades.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
18.07.2017
The genetics of severe illness in children with the common cold
The genetics of severe illness in children with the common cold
EPFL scientists have discovered gene variants that make children life-threatening susceptible to common-cold viruses. Although most children can handle viral respiratory infections like the common cold, about 2% of children become sick enough to require hospitalization. There are some known risk factors for this, but severe illness still affects 1 in 1000 previously healthy kids.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
18.07.2017
A gene increases the severity of common colds
A gene increases the severity of common colds
Researchers funded by the SNSF have discovered mutations that worsen respiratory infections among children. Their study explain the mechanism involved. Colds that are not linked to influenza are generally benign. Still, 2% of each generation of children have to go to hospital following a virulent infection.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
17.07.2017
New bacterial defense mechanism of the CRISPR-Cas system uncovered
New bacterial defense mechanism of the CRISPR-Cas system uncovered
The CRISPR-Cas system is an immune system that is found in many bacteria. It provides protection from viruses and other molecular parasites that can invade the bacterium and take over its genome. In these systems, the immunity is mediated by a complex multi-protein molecular machinery that uses RNA molecules as molecular guides to recognize the invader and target it for destruction.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
17.07.2017
A new ligand extends the half-life of peptides from minutes to days
A new ligand extends the half-life of peptides from minutes to days
EPFL scientists have developed a ligand molecule that connects peptide drugs to blood-serum albumin and keeps them from being cleared out by the kidneys too soon. The ligand is easy to synthesize and can extend the half-life of therapeutic peptides from minutes to several days. Peptides are biological molecules, made up of short sequences of amino acids.
Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics - Medicine/Pharmacology
13.07.2017
Testing a soft artificial heart
Testing a soft artificial heart
ETH researchers from the Functional Materials Laboratory have developed a silicone heart that beats almost like a human heart.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
06.07.2017
How Cats and Cows Protect Farm Children from Asthma
How Cats and Cows Protect Farm Children from Asthma
More and more people suffer from allergies and asthma. In the past decades, these diseases have massively increased in industrialized countries. Today, about 30 percent of children have allergies - with the exception of farm children. Among farm children, the disease is increasing less dramatically than in the case of their friends who live in the same village, but not on a farm.
Agronomy/Food Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
05.07.2017
Naturalness as a success factor
Naturalness as a success factor
‘Naturalness' is a construct - but according to a new study from the ETH Consumer Behavior group, a product's success on the food market is primarily defined by whether or not consumers perceive it as natural. The increasingly artificial and virtual nature of everyday life has now achieved broad acceptance, and the benefits that technological development bring to everyone cannot be denied.
Physics/Materials Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
04.07.2017
Bandage with a voice
Bandage with a voice
A novel bandage alerts the nursing staff as soon as a wound starts healing badly. Sensors incorporated into the base material glow with a different intensity if the wound's pH level changes.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
29.06.2017
Overactive Scavenger Cells May Cause Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's
Overactive Scavenger Cells May Cause Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s
Similar to other neurodegenerative disorders, Alzheimer's is a disease in which the cognitive abilities of afflicted persons continuously worsen. The reason is the increasing loss of synapses, the contact points of the neurons, in the brain. In the case of Alzheimer's, certain protein fragments, the β-amyloid peptides, are suspected of causing the death of neurons.
Physics/Materials Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
27.06.2017
Nano particles as food additives: improving risk assessment
Nano particles as food additives: improving risk assessment
The anticaking agent E551 silicon dioxide, or silica, has been used widely in the food industry over the past 50 years, and was long thought to be quite safe. Now, however, researchers working on the National Research Programme ‘Opportunities and Risks of Nanomaterials' have discovered that these nanoparticles can affect the immune system of the digestive tract.
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