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Medicine/Pharmacology



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Medicine/Pharmacology
01.03.2017
From heroin addiction to alcohol-related problems
From heroin addiction to alcohol-related problems
Around 3,000 heroin addicts currently receive opioids such as methadone, buprenorphine or morphine as part of their treatment in the Canton of Zurich.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
23.02.2017
Rare proteins collapse earlier
Rare proteins collapse earlier
Some organisms are able to survive in hot springs, while others can only live at mild temperatures because their proteins aren't able to withstand such extreme heat. ETH researchers investigated these differences and showed that often only a few key proteins determine the life and heat-induced death of a cell.
Medicine/Pharmacology
20.02.2017
Prospect for more effective treatment of nerve pain
Prospect for more effective treatment of nerve pain
The sharp pain shoots to the face or teeth and seriously torments patients. Known as trigeminal neuralgia, it is one of the worst chronic nerve pains. The bouts are triggered by touch, such as shaving, putting on make-up, showering, talking and tooth brushing, or even a gust of wind. The cause is usually an irritation of the trigeminal nerve, the cranial nerve responsible for the sensory innervation of the facial area, parts of the scalp, and the oral cavity.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Computer Science/Telecom
17.02.2017
Digital reconstruction of teeth
Digital reconstruction of teeth
ETH Zurich researchers and Disney Research have produced a new algorithm that allows non-invasive reconstruction of the teeth and gums from digital photos.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
07.02.2017
Genetic defects in tooth enamel conducive to development of caries
Why do some people develop caries even though they always brush their teeth carefully while others are less stringent regarding dental hygiene yet do not have any holes' Ultimately, both have bacteria on the surface of their teeth which can attack the enamel. Enamel forms via the mineralization of specific enamel proteins.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
30.01.2017
Not necessarily harmful: Protein aggregates in the brain
Not necessarily harmful: Protein aggregates in the brain
Protein aggregates in neurons are characteristic for Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
27.01.2017
New study into leukemia offers clearer understanding of its biology
New study into leukemia offers clearer understanding of its biology
EPFL scientists have made an extensive study in the cause of leukemia that could greatly improve the way we treat the disease. Leukemia affects 350,000 people worldwide. It is a cancer of the white blood cells, which are the cells of the immune system and are produced by stem cells in the bone marrow. There are two types of chronic and two types of acute leukemia.
Agronomy/Food Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
25.01.2017
Deprivation: a decisive factor in obesity
Deprivation: a decisive factor in obesity
A joint study involving Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV) and the Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) shows that people with a genetic predisposition to obesity are more likely to develop the condition if they find themselves in a situation of deprivation. The city of Lausanne was used as a test site by the researchers.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Physics/Materials Science
19.01.2017
Added value for cancer patients
Added value for cancer patients
For more than 30 years, cancer patients have been coming to the small locality of Villigen on the Aare River.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
18.01.2017
Unveiling the biology behind nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
Unveiling the biology behind nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
EPFL scientists have discovered a new biological mechanism behind nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease covers a range of diseases that result from fat accumulation in the liver, but not as a result of alcohol abuse. Fat buildup can lead to liver inflammation, scarring and irreversible damage, such as cirrhosis and liver failure.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
17.01.2017
On track to heal leukaemia
On track to heal leukaemia
Media releases, information for representatives of the media Media Relations (E) The first clinical studies for a new type of immunotherapy for leukaemia are beginning at Bern's University Hospital and the Department of Clinical Research (DCR) of the University of Bern. Antibodies discovered in the laboratory should inhibit the growth of tumour cells.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
16.01.2017
Using microfluidics to improve genetics research
Using microfluidics to improve genetics research
Scientists at EPFL have developed a technique that can be a game-changer for genetics by making the characterization of DNA-binding proteins much faster, more accurate, and efficient.  Genes hold the DNA code for producing all the proteins of the cell. To begin this process, genes require a huge family of DNA-binding proteins called transcription factors, which are of enormous interest to biologists today.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
12.01.2017
Putting chromosomes through the shredder
Putting chromosomes through the shredder
When a certain human enzyme is left uncontrolled, it breaks up chromosomes into tiny pieces. This is damaging to cells, but useful for killing tumours. ETH researchers have now come to understand the underlying mechanism. Our cells contain the enzyme MUS81; this is called on in emergencies, for example, when cells are unable to replicate because the DNA-replication machinery gets tangled up in strands of DNA.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
10.01.2017
In a simple way to great complexity
In a simple way to great complexity
ETH microbiologists have succeeded in showing that nature produces one of the most complex known bioactive natural products in a staggeringly simple way.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
03.01.2017
From photosynthesis to new compounds for eye diseases
From photosynthesis to new compounds for eye diseases
Researchers have succeeded in using X-rays to minutely observe a photosynthesis reaction and produce a movie of the event. The findings will aid understanding of similar processes in the human eye. Plants and algae are not alone in undergoing photosynthesis. Some bacteria also use energy from sunlight to grow and reproduce.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
22.12.2016
Forces at play: A new infection route for bacteria
Forces at play: A new infection route for bacteria
Snapshots from a Molecular Dynamics simulation of a single shigella toxin particle binding to its lipid partners in the vesicle membrane (side and top views).
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
21.12.2016
Aging & cancer: An enzyme protects chromosomes from oxidative damage
Aging & cancer: An enzyme protects chromosomes from oxidative damage
EPFL scientists have identified a protein that caps chromosomes during cell division and protects them from oxidative damage and shortening, which are associated with aging and cancer. When cells divide, they pack up all of their genetic material in the tightly wrapped chromosomes. The ends of our chromosomes have a unique structure, named a telomere.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
19.12.2016
How complex cells originated
How complex cells originated
Media releases, information for representatives of the media Media Relations (E) Mitochondria are the ‘power plants' of complex cells. In order to provide the cell with energy they need protein building blocks, which are imported from the outside. Over billions of years the ‘protein import machines' necessary for this process have developed differently than previously assumed, as biochemists in Bern have discovered.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
08.12.2016
New weapon against Diabetes
New weapon against Diabetes
Researchers have used the simplest approach yet to produce artificial beta cells from human kidney cells. Like their natural model, the artificial cells act as both sugar sensors and insulin producers. Researchers led by ETH Professor Martin Fussenegger at the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering (D-BSSE) in Basel have produced artificial beta cells using a straightforward engineering approach.
Medicine/Pharmacology
07.12.2016
"Pulling" bacteria out of blood
Magnets instead of antibiotics could provide a possible new treatment method for blood infection. This involves the blood of patients being mixed with magnetic iron particles, which bind the bacteria to them after which they are removed from the blood using magnets.
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