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Physics/Materials Science



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Physics/Materials Science
14.02.2017
Frequency combs: on-chip integration on track
Frequency combs: on-chip integration on track
EPFL scientists have found a way to miniaturize frequency combs, realizing a new step toward miniaturization of such tools. Their device can measure light oscillations with a precision of 12 digits. A compact, precision tool for counting and tracking laser frequencies may improve atomic clocks and optical data transmission devices.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
14.02.2017
Measuring entropy
Measuring entropy
A scanning-tunneling microscope (STM), used to study changes in the shape of a single molecule at the atomic scale, impacts the ability of that molecule to make these changes - the entropy of the molecule is changed and, in turn, can be measured.
Physics/Materials Science - Computer Science/Telecom
14.02.2017
Success by deception
Success by deception
Theoretical physicists from ETH Zurich deliberately misled intelligent machines, and thus refined the process of machine learning. They created a new method that allows computers to categorise data - even when humans have no idea what this categorisation might look like. When computers independently identify bodies of water and their outlines in satellite images, or beat the world's best professional players at the board game Go, then adaptive algorithms are working in the background.
Physics/Materials Science - Mathematics
10.02.2017
Taming complexity
Taming complexity
Quantum systems consisting of many particles are a major challenge for physicists, since their behaviour can be determined only with immense computational power. ETH physicists have now discovered an elegant way to simplify the problem. Classical physics offers a relatively easy approach to describing how objects move in our everyday world.
Physics/Materials Science
08.02.2017
Measuring time without a clock
Measuring time without a clock
EPFL scientists have been able to measure the ultrashort time delay in electron photoemission without using a clock. The discovery has important implications for fundamental research and cutting-edge technology.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Physics/Materials Science
19.01.2017
Added value for cancer patients
Added value for cancer patients
For more than 30 years, cancer patients have been coming to the small locality of Villigen on the Aare River.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
17.01.2017
An ultrafast light source in a laboratory format
An ultrafast light source in a laboratory format
Researchers at ETH Zurich and the University of Geneva have succeeded for the first time in using a laboratory X-ray source to demonstrate how two highly fluorinated molecules change within a few quadrillionths of a second, or femtoseconds. In nature, some processes occur so quickly that even the blink of an eye is very slow in comparison.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
05.01.2017
Nanotechnology enables new insights into chemical reactions
Nanotechnology enables new insights into chemical reactions
Eighty percent of all products of the chemical industry are manufactured with catalytic processes. Catalysis is also indispensable in energy conversion and treatment of exhaust gases. It is important for these processes to run as quickly and efficiently as possible; that protects the environment while also saving time and conserving resources.
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
22.12.2016
The fight against creeping cables
The fight against creeping cables
Switzerland's overhead power lines are showing signs of old age and can be damaged by power surges. But how long will they actually last? Empa researchers have developed a tool to keep tabs on the aging process.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
16.12.2016
Towards energy-saving data storage
Towards energy-saving data storage
A new material retains its special magnetic properties even at room temperature A new material could become the basis for future data storage devices, since it may enable significant reductions in energy demands in comparison to present-day hard drives. This is a material from the class of so-called magnetoelectric multiferroics, whose distinguishing characteristic is that their magnetic and electrical properties are coupled to each other.
Physics/Materials Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
02.12.2016
High-precision magnetic field sensing
High-precision magnetic field sensing
Scientists have developed a highly sensitive sensor to detect tiny changes in strong magnetic fields. The sensor may find widespread use in medicine and other areas. Researchers from the Institute for Biomedical Engineering, which is operated jointly by ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich, have succeeded in measuring tiny changes in strong magnetic fields with unprecedented precision.
Physics/Materials Science
29.11.2016
Simulations for More Efficient Power Stations
Simulations for More Efficient Power Stations
In most cases, electricity is produced when water is heated and transformed into vapour. Vapour bubbles in the water play a decisive role in this process by collecting in a layer at a heated wall.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
28.11.2016
Networked colours
Networked colours
A team that includes ETH Zurich scientists is the first to use materials with a network-like structure to create a full spectrum of intense colours.
Physics/Materials Science
24.11.2016
A new perovskite could lead the next generation of data storage
A new perovskite could lead the next generation of data storage
EPFL scientists have developed a new perovskite material with unique properties that can be used to build next-generation hard drives.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
23.11.2016
Capturing an elusive spectrum of light
Capturing an elusive spectrum of light
Researchers led by EPFL have built ultra-high quality optical cavities for the elusive mid-infrared spectral region, paving the way for new chemical and biological sensors, as well as promising technologies. The mid-infrared spectral window, referred to as ‘molecular fingerprint region,' includes light wavelengths from 2.5 to 20 'm.
Physics/Materials Science - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
17.11.2016
Switching off vibrations
Switching off vibrations
Macroscopic crystal structures can absorb unwanted vibrations or filter noise - without any electronics or electricity whatsoever.
Physics/Materials Science
01.11.2016
Hot on the heels of quasiparticles
Hot on the heels of quasiparticles
Electrons in a solid can team up to form so-called quasiparticles, which lead to new phenomena. Physicists at ETH in Zurich have now studied previously unidentified quasiparticles in a new class of atomically thin semiconductors.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
30.10.2016
Ceramics 3D printed from foams
Ceramics 3D printed from foams
ETH researchers have used an additive manufacturing process to print an extremely porous ceramic component. Manufacturing a material of this kind with a 3D printer is a considerable achievement. Doctoral student Carla Minas, from the Complex Materials group led by ETH Professor André Studart, has succeeded in creating a highly porous and yet extremely robust ceramic material, which she ‘printed' using an additive manufacturing process.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
27.10.2016
Finally red!
Finally red!
Empa researchers have pulled off a masterstroke of ceramics research: as of now, a dark-red ceramic bezel adorns a Swiss luxury watch - a world premiere and stunning example of top-flight materials science.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
14.10.2016
Bacteria can make underground nuclear waste repositories safer
Bacteria can make underground nuclear waste repositories safer
Naturally occurring bacteria could consume pent-up hydrogen gas in nuclear waste repositories to prevent radioactive leaks, say researchers at EPFL. Scientists may have found an unexpected ally in the long-term disposal of nuclear waste: bacteria. In a recent study, a research team led by EPFL discovered a microbial community made up of seven species of bacteria that live naturally hundreds of meters underground in the very rock layers that have been chosen to host Swiss nuclear waste.
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