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Pharmacology - Health - 03.04.2024
New Discovery Unravels Malaria Invasion Mechanism
New Discovery Unravels Malaria Invasion Mechanism
A recent breakthrough sheds light on how the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, invades human red blood cells. The study, led by the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) and Griffith University's Institute for Glycomics, reveals the role of a sugar called sialic acid in this invasion process.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.03.2024
Protect cells from excesses of the immune system
Protect cells from excesses of the immune system
Researchers at EPFL reveal how Drosophila's Turandot proteins protect against immune self-harm. The study is the first to identify some proteins that protect against antimicrobial peptides offering insights into cellular resilience mechanisms with potential therapeutic applications. In the constant battle between organisms and pathogens, our immune system plays the role of a vigilant guardian.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.03.2024
Locating single neurons that monitor and regulate the heart and lungs
Locating single neurons that monitor and regulate the heart and lungs
EPFL neuroscientists have located single neurons in a deep structure of the brain that regulates the heart and the lungs, a first detection in humans. The results shed light on how the brain-body system self-regulates both vital bio-rhythms. The body self-regulates in a process known as homeostasis, and the brain is responsible for this as it is constantly monitoring all'of the body's vital signals.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.03.2024
An Immunotherapy to Overcome Resistant Leukemia
An Immunotherapy to Overcome Resistant Leukemia
Researchers at the University of Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich have discovered that a specific mutation in the cancer cells of an aggressive type of blood cancer can prevent novel immunotherapies such as CAR T-cell therapy from working. Their study also explains why the cancer cells are resistant and how this resistance can be overcome: through concomitant pharmacotherapy or genetically improved CAR T-cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.03.2024
New insight into sensing and function of the bacterial lysate OM-85
Bacterial lysates are widely used in the clinic to minimize the pathologic consequences of respiratory infections. Our new study shows how one such lysate, OM-85, works on human myeloid cells to trigger an immunomodulatory gene circuit. Bellinzona, March 21, 2024 - OM-85 is a bacterial lysate commonly used in clinical practice to reduce duration and frequency of recurrent respiratory tract infections.

Health - Research Management - 20.03.2024
Parasitic Worms and Liver Disease in Rural Laos
Parasitic Worms and Liver Disease in Rural Laos
A study published yesterday by Swiss TPH and partners in Lao PDR has revealed high rates of Steatotic Liver Disease in a rural region where liver fluke infections and diabetes are prevalent. Surprisingly, an infection with parasitic worms was inversely associated with the prevalence of Steatotic Liver Disease.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.03.2024
Reducing the side effects of breast and ovarian cancer treatment
Reducing the side effects of breast and ovarian cancer treatment
By showing how a type of anticancer drug kills cancer cells and damages healthy cells, a team from the University of Geneva is paving the way for improved treatments. Some anti-cancer treatments not only target tumour cells but also healthy cells. If their effects on the latter are too strong, their use can become limiting.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.03.2024
Fighting heart attack down to the smallest vessels
Fighting heart attack down to the smallest vessels
Researchers in Bern have co-developed and tested a new method to combat the blockage of tiny coronary arteries after a heart attack. The new approach, born from a cooperation of engineers, clinicians, and industry, offers a treatment option to prevent the death of heart tissue after a heart attack, responsible for poor long-term patient health.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.03.2024
Inflammatory bowel disease after a stem cell transplant
A stem cell donation saves a leukemia sufferer's life. Five years later, the patient develops a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that occurs very rarely following a transplant. Researchers from the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel havestudied the case and are calling for more extensive genetic analyses in bone marrow donors.

Microtechnics - Health - 13.03.2024
Robotic interface masters a soft touch
Researchers have developed a haptic device capable of reproducing the softness of various materials, from a marshmallow to a beating heart, overcoming a deceptively complex challenge that has previously eluded roboticists. The perception of softness can be taken for granted, but it plays a crucial role in many actions and interactions - from judging the ripeness of an avocado to conducting a medical exam, or holding the hand of a loved one.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.03.2024
The surprising effect of presence hallucinations on social perception
The surprising effect of presence hallucinations on social perception
EPFL neuroscientists have devised a way to alter our social perception and monitor specific types of hallucinations, both in healthy individuals and patients with Parkinson's disease. The test, which is also available online, provides the medical community with a tool to monitor hallucination susceptibility.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.03.2024
Maternal obesity may promote liver cancer
Maternal obesity may promote liver cancer
A team from the University of Geneva and the HUG has revealed the role of the microbiota in the increased risk of developing liver disease in the offspring of mothers suffering from obesity. Obesity, which could reach 50% of the population in certain developed countries by 2030, is a major public health concern.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.03.2024
A new direction for cancer research
A new direction for cancer research
In collaboration with University Hospital Basel, researchers from ETH are investigating the early stages of bladder cancer. Their findings show that future research should also focus on mechanical changes in tumour tissue. Dagmar Iber is Professor of Computational Biology at ETH's Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering in Basel.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.03.2024
Cutting-edge research from Basel
Cutting-edge research from Basel
From new tests and therapies to the fundamental principles of biology: five compelling examples of the benefits of new bioengineering technologies. Better cancer therapies Certain immune cells can attack tumours - but cells derived from donor blood can pose a risk to recipients. Now, a group of researchers led by ETH professor Sai Reddy has managed to modify the immune cells of donor blood to make them safe to administer.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.03.2024
Mini-organs with big potential
Mini-organs with big potential
Organoids grown from human stem cells can help provide answers to important medical questions. In a partnership that looks set to profit both sides, ETH professor Barbara Treutlein has teamed up with pharma giant Roche to advance research in this area. The clumps of cells are modest in size, ranging from just a few millimetres to a couple of centimetres - yet their impact on medical research could be huge.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.03.2024
Designed for bold visions
Designed for bold visions
The idea of ETH Zurich establishing a Department of Biosystems in Basel once seemed unachievable. Today, the department occupies a new building where the dividing lines between biology, computer science and engineering are blurred - and researchers increasingly focus on medical applications An impressive sight awaits first-time visitors to the new BSS building.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.03.2024
Dopamine production is not behind vulnerability to cocaine abuse
Dopamine production is not behind vulnerability to cocaine abuse
A team from the University of Geneva shows that our ability to produce dopamine - the 'happiness hormone' - is not correlated with increased vulnerability to drugs. Why do some people who try drugs struggle with substance abuse while others don't? This question has long puzzled scientists. A team from the University of Geneva explored the complex interplay between personality traits and brain chemistry.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.02.2024
The 'switch' that keeps the immune system from attacking the body
The ’switch’ that keeps the immune system from attacking the body
Scientists at EPFL uncover the mechanism by which cells mark the protein cGAS for degradation, which is critical in preventing the immune system from mistakenly attacking the body's own tissues. A microscopic battle rages in our bodies, as our cells constantly fend off invaders through our immune system, a complex system of cells and proteins designed to protect us from harmful pathogens.

Health - Innovation - 27.02.2024
Finding and blocking infection routes in hospitals
During the COVID-19 pandemic, hospitals often became hubs of infection. Researchers from ETH Zurich, EPFL and the ISI Foundation are developing a wearable tracking system for healthcare facilities that can identify the risks of infections. Initial tests in Switzerland and Africa show its potential. Hospital-acquired infections are an immense problem.

Health - Physics - 27.02.2024
Nanotweezers accelerate phage therapy
Nanotweezers accelerate phage therapy
Scientists at EPFL have developed a game-changing technique that uses light to manipulate and identify individual bacteriophages without the need for chemical labels or bioreceptors, potentially accelerating and revolutionizing phage-based therapies that can treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.