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Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 27.05.2024
Cultural Networks of Central African Hunter-Gatherers Have Ancient Origin
Cultural Networks of Central African Hunter-Gatherers Have Ancient Origin
Extensive social networks between different hunter-gatherer groups in the Congo Basin existed long before agriculture arrived in the region. This continent-wide exchange preserved a cultural diversity that evolved thousands of years ago, as researchers from the University of Zurich show based on musical instruments, specialized vocabulary and genetic information.

Life Sciences - Environment - 08.05.2024
Limited Adaptability Makes Freshwater Bacteria Vulnerable to Climate Change
Limited Adaptability Makes Freshwater Bacteria Vulnerable to Climate Change
Freshwater bacteria with small genomes frequently undergo prolonged periods of adaptive stagnation. Based on genomic analyses of samples from Lake Zurich and other European lakes, researchers at the University of Zurich uncovered specific evolutionary strategies that shape these bacteria's lifestyles.

Economics - Health - 18.04.2024
CEOs' Human Concern Translates into Higher Stock Price
CEOs’ Human Concern Translates into Higher Stock Price
Compassionate leadership has tangible benefits: CEOs' expressions of empathy correlate with positive stock performance, a study led by the University of Zurich shows. The researchers analyzed data from conference calls between CEOs and financial analysts during the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic prompted an unprecedented financial crisis.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.03.2024
An Immunotherapy to Overcome Resistant Leukemia
An Immunotherapy to Overcome Resistant Leukemia
Researchers at the University of Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich have discovered that a specific mutation in the cancer cells of an aggressive type of blood cancer can prevent novel immunotherapies such as CAR T-cell therapy from working. Their study also explains why the cancer cells are resistant and how this resistance can be overcome: through concomitant pharmacotherapy or genetically improved CAR T-cells.

Environment - Paleontology - 20.03.2024
Ancient Giant Dolphin Discovered in the Amazon
Ancient Giant Dolphin Discovered in the Amazon
Measuring between 3 to 3.5 meters, 16 million years old: Paleontologists from the University of Zurich have announced the discovery of a new species of freshwater dolphin in the Peruvian Amazon region. Surprisingly, its closest living relatives can be found in the river dolphins of South Asia.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.02.2024
Arterial Connections Improve Treatment Outcomes Following Stroke
Arterial Connections Improve Treatment Outcomes Following Stroke
Blood vessels that cross-connect adjacent arterial trees regulate blood flow to the brain in stroke patients. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown that these vessels prevent brain hemorrhage following treatment to remove blood clots. They play a crucial role in the recovery of stroke patients.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.02.2024
Cracking the Code of Neurodegeneration
Cracking the Code of Neurodegeneration
Scientists at the University of Zurich have developed an innovative neural cell culture model, shedding light on the intricate mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. Their research pinpointed a misbehaving protein as a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD).

Life Sciences - 15.02.2024
Asexual Propagation of Crop Plants Gets Closer
Asexual Propagation of Crop Plants Gets Closer
When the female gametes in plants become fertilized, a signal from the sperm activates cell division, leading to the formation of new plant seeds. This activation can also be deliberately triggered without fertilization, as researchers have shown. Their findings open up new avenues for the asexual propagation of crop plants.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.02.2024
Stress Influences Brain and Psyche Via Immune System
Stress Influences Brain and Psyche Via Immune System
Chronic stress affects the immune system and the brain. researchers now show that a particular enzyme found in cells of the immune system enters the brain under stress. In mice, it causes them to withdraw and avoid social contact. This newly discovered connection between body and mind in stress-related mental illnesses could lead to new treatments for depression.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.01.2024
Firing Nerve Fibers in the Brain Are Supplied with Energy on Demand
Firing Nerve Fibers in the Brain Are Supplied with Energy on Demand
To rapidly transmit electrical signals in the brain, the long nerve fibers are insulated by specialized cells called oligodendrocytes. These cells also respond to the electrical signals of active nerve fibers and provide them with energy on demand, as researchers have discovered. If this process, regulated by potassium, is disabled in mice, the nerve fibers are severely damaged as the animals age - resembling the defects of neurodegenerative diseases.

Social Sciences - 24.01.2024
Young People from Poorer Families Make Fewer Friends
A new study has found that children growing up in low-income families have fewer opportunities to make friends and to socially integrate at school. Researchers from the University of Zurich and the University of Stockholm examined data from over 200 school classes in Sweden and reached this conclusion.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.01.2024
Complement System Causes Cell Damage in Long Covid
Medicine Long Covid patients suffer from chronic symptoms such as fatigue or shortness of breath. As researchers at the University of Zurich and University Hospital Zurich have discovered, this is to some extent due to a part of our immune system called the complement system. The study identified a pattern in the blood proteins that will improve the diagnosis and perhaps also the targeted treatment of Long Covid.

Life Sciences - 03.01.2024
Early Primates Likely Lived in Pairs
Primate social organization is more flexible than previously assumed. According to a new study led by UZH, the first primates probably lived in pairs, while only around 15 percent of individuals were solitary. Primates - and this includes humans - are thought of as highly social animals. Many species of monkeys and apes live in groups.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.12.2023
Physical and Social Activities Promote Healthy Brain Aging
Neuropsychology Physical and social activities in old age have a protective effect on the entorhinal cortex, researchers at UZH have shown. This important area of the brain, which plays a central role in memory, is impaired in patients with Alzheimer's disease, even in the early stages. Physical exercise is associated with a variety of positive health aspects.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 30.11.2023
Inoculation Against Diseased Fields
Inoculation Against Diseased Fields
Plant Biology Farmland often harbors a multitude of pathogens which attack plants and reduce yields. A Swiss research team has now shown that inoculating the soil with mycorrhizal fungi can help maintain or even improve yields without the use of additional fertilizers or pesticides. In a large-scale field trial, plant yield increased by up to 40 percent.

Environment - Life Sciences - 28.11.2023
Protection of Highly Threatened Sharks and Rays Inadequate
Paleontology Sharks, rays and skates are the ocean's most threatened vertebrate group. Research led by the University of Zurich into their functional diversity has now revealed previously overlooked, critical conservation priorities, thereby underscoring the urgent need for targeted action to safeguard the threatened species.

Social Sciences - 08.11.2023
How Often Intra-European Migrants Send Money Back Home
Sociology How often do European migrants in Switzerland transfer money to their home countries, and how much money do they send? A study by the University of Zurich now shows that people from Portugal tend to send smaller amounts more often, while people from the UK are more likely to send larger amounts but do so less frequently.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.10.2023
Gene therapy: Effective transport of large genes
Gene therapy: Effective transport of large genes
In gene therapy, not all genes can be transported equally well into the target cells. Researchers have now developed a flexible method to deliver large genes efficiently and without significant side effects. The approach has great potential for therapeutic applications . Gene therapy is currently the most promising approach to treat hereditary diseases.

Environment - Computer Science - 22.09.2023
AI Increases Precision in Plant Observation
AI Increases Precision in Plant Observation
Evolutionary Biology Artificial intelligence (AI) can help plant scientists collect and analyze unprecedented volumes of data, which would not be possible using conventional methods. Researchers at the University of Zurich (UZH) have now used big data, machine learning and field observations in the university's experimental garden to show how plants respond to changes in the environment.

Sport - Economics - 13.07.2023
Women's soccer rated just as highly as men's soccer
Women’s soccer rated just as highly as men’s soccer
With the start of the Women's World Cup on July 20, the quality of women's football is once again in the spotlight. In this discourse, a new study provides interesting insights: According to the study, men's soccer is only rated significantly better when the gender of the players is clearly identifiable.
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