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Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 18.07.2017
Low-dose diazepam can increase social competitiveness
Low-dose diazepam can increase social competitiveness
EPFL scientists have discovered how low-dose anxiolytics increase the social competitiveness of high-anxious individuals by boosting the energy output of mitochondria in an area of the mammalian brain that controls motivation and reward. Psychologists speak of anxiety in two forms: ‘state' anxiety, which refers to anxiety arising from a particular situation; and ‘trait' anxiety, which refers to anxiety as part of a person's overall personality.

Life Sciences - 12.07.2017
Obstacle course for caterpillars
Obstacle course for caterpillars
Spines and thorns keep hungry mammals at bay - or at least, that's the conventional wisdom. However, ETH researchers have now shown that spiky growths on plants make life difficult for caterpillars too. This finding could be important for crop breeding. "Caterpillars can occasionally be skewered by the spines," says Rupesh Kariyat, a scientist at ETH Zurich's Institute of Integrative Biology.

Life Sciences - 10.07.2017
Synapses in the Brain Mirror the Structure of the Visual World
Synapses in the Brain Mirror the Structure of the Visual World
The research team of Prof. Sonja Hofer at the Biozentrum, University of Basel, has discovered why our brain might be so good at perceiving edges and contours. Neurons that respond to different parts of elongated edges are connected and thus exchange information. This can make it easier for the brain to identify contours of objects.

Life Sciences - 04.07.2017
Praying Mantises Hunt Down Birds Worldwide
Praying Mantises Hunt Down Birds Worldwide
A study by zoologists from Switzerland and the US shows: praying mantises all over the globe also include birds in their diet. The Wilson Journal of Ornithology has just published the results. Praying mantises are carnivorous insects with powerful raptorial front legs that usually depend on arthropods such as insects or spiders as their primary prey.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.06.2017
Designed Proteins to Treat Muscular Dystrophy
Designed Proteins to Treat Muscular Dystrophy
The cell scaffolding holds muscle fibers together and protects them from damage. Individuals who suffer from muscular dystrophy often lack essential components in this cell scaffold. As a result, their muscles lack strength and become progressively weaker. The research team of Prof. Markus Rüegg at the Biozentrum, University of Basel, has now designed two proteins that stabilize the cell scaffolding link it to the muscle fiber and thereby restore muscle structure and function.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.06.2017
The gene behind follicular lymphoma
The gene behind follicular lymphoma
EPFL scientists have discovered an important gene whose loss lies behind follicular lymphoma, an incurable cancer. Follicular lymphoma is an incurable cancer that affects over 200,000 people worldwide every year. A form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, follicular lymphoma develops when the body starts making abnormal B-cells, which are white blood cells that in normal conditions fight infections.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.06.2017
Bacteria Free Themselves with Molecular ‘Speargun'
Bacteria Free Themselves with Molecular ‘Speargun’
Many bacteria are armed with nano-spearguns, which they use to combat unwelcome competitors or knockout host cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.06.2017
Gene Transfer Keeps Bacteria Fit
Gene Transfer Keeps Bacteria Fit
Researchers at the University of Baselâ?‘s Biozentrum have discovered that Bartonella bacteria exchange genes efficiently using a domesticated virus encoded in their genome.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.06.2017
Boost for Zurich biomedicine
Boost for Zurich biomedicine
The Helmut Horten Foundation has supported Zurich's medical hub for many years. Now, a new donation to ETH will enable the strengthening of the Zurich-Ticino ‘health axis'.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 12.06.2017
Hidden patterns of brain activity
In a collaboration led by EPFLâ?‘s Blue Brain, scientists discover patterns of brain activity â'' never before observed â?- with the help of mathematics, providing insight into how neurons collectively process information. Brains of healthy rats that are the same age share many features, such as similar numbers and types of neurons present in the six layers of the cortex.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.06.2017
Uncovering the biology of a painful and disfiguring pediatric disease
Uncovering the biology of a painful and disfiguring pediatric disease
EPFL scientists have identified the biological mechanism behind the painful, potentially lethal, disfiguring Hyaline Fibromatosis Syndrome.â? Image caption:â?Loss of ANTXR2 leads to the accumulation of extracellular material in mice uterus and sterility (Left). Collagen 6 removal in mice without ANTXR2 restore uterine structure and function (Right).

Life Sciences - Health - 12.06.2017
Fighting fire blight and detecting Salmonella
Fighting fire blight and detecting Salmonella
ETH researchers have created an effective weapon against the plant disease fire blight and a new method for detection of Salmonella. Both are based on particular viruses that attack only one species of bacteria. The plant disease fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora , is dreaded by fruit growers.

Life Sciences - 09.06.2017
Ancient Bones Reveal Insights Into Swiss Wild Horse Population
Researchers from the University of Basel have, for the first time, studied how regional environmental changes influenced the populations of wild horses in Switzerland 25,000 years ago. Their results show: Contrary to the wild horses in the Eurasian steppe; the Swiss population grew considerably after the end of the last Ice Age.

Life Sciences - Physics - 07.06.2017
More concepts, fewer facts
More concepts, fewer facts
ETH biology lecturers have tested secondary school leavers and students to determine their knowledge of biological concepts.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.06.2017
New findings could lead to improved in vitro testing
New findings could lead to improved in vitro testing
EPFL researchers propose a new approach of performing in vitro tests on nanoparticles that could enhance a correlation to in vivo results. This involves reproducing in the lab the dynamic and fluidic variations that these particles experience in the human body. Before new nanoparticles or other nanomedicines can be injected into the human body, a whole series of tests must be conducted in the laboratory, then in living cells, and in the end on humans.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 02.06.2017
A new approach to combatting anxiety states, pain and inflammation
A new approach to combatting anxiety states, pain and inflammation
Media releases, information for representatives of the media Media Relations (E) Endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids) play an important role in the brain and immune system. Bern researchers from the National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) "TransCure" have now found a new way to influence the endocannabinoid system.

Life Sciences - 01.06.2017
New research tools
New research tools
At the age of 29, biotechnologist Randall Platt has already achieved a lot: more than 1,000 research laboratories around the world use a method that he developed.

Life Sciences - Innovation / Technology - 23.05.2017
Revealing how neurons communicate
Revealing how neurons communicate
The ETH spinoff MaxWell Biosystems AG develops microelectrode platforms for electrophysiological tests on nerve cells, opening up new possibilities for pharmaceutical research. Now, the company received CHF 130,000 in starting capital from the Venture Kick initiative MaxWell Biosystems AG's head office is hidden away in a Basel laboratory building previously used by Syngenta, just a stone's throw from ETH Zurich's Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering (D-BSSE).

Health - Life Sciences - 23.05.2017
Discovery of a Key Regulatory Gene in Cardiac Valve Formation
Researchers from the University of Basel in Switzerland have identified a key regulator gene for the formation of cardiac valves - a process crucial to normal embryonic heart development. These results are published in the journal Cell Reports today. The heart is the first functional organ that develops in vertebrate embryos.

Life Sciences - 22.05.2017
Digital birdhouses make studying owls easier
Digital birdhouses make studying owls easier
EPFL students have developed a system that can detect when barn owls fly into and out of their nests, without disturbing the birds.

Life Sciences - Environment - 18.05.2017
15 new professors
15 new professors
At its meeting of 17 May 2017, the ETH Board appointed 15 new professors upon application of ETH Zurich President Lino Guzzella.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.05.2017
Two major projects drive genetics research forward at Campus Biotech
Two major projects drive genetics research forward at Campus Biotech
Good news for the fields of genetic research and gene therapy: two major projects based at Campus Biotech, EPFL's outpost in Geneva, were announced simultaneously today.

Life Sciences - Environment - 08.05.2017
What silver fir aDNA can tell us about Neolithic forests
What silver fir aDNA can tell us about Neolithic forests
Media releases, information for representatives of the media Media Relations (E) A new technique makes it possible to cost-effectively analyse genetic material from fossil plant and animal remains. Researchers from the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL and the universities of Lausanne and Bern have used this technique to examine the DNA of silver fir needles found in lake sediment in Ticino.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.04.2017
Link Discovered between Immune System, Brain Structure and Memory
Link Discovered between Immune System, Brain Structure and Memory
In two independent studies, scientists at the University of Basel have demonstrated that both the structure of the brain and several memory functions are linked to immune system genes. The scientific journals Nature Communications and Nature Human Behaviour have published the results of the research.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.04.2017
Action Required: Invasive Fungus Is Killing European Salamanders
The situation is alarming: The invasive Asian fungus has recently led to mass mortality of fire salamanders in the Netherlands, Belgium and Germany.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.04.2017
Chaining up diarrhoea pathogens
Chaining up diarrhoea pathogens
Researchers have clarified how vaccinations can combat bacterial intestinal diseases: vaccine-induced antibodies in the intestine chain up pathogens as they grow in the intestine, which prevents disease and surprisingly also hinders the spread of antibiotic resistance. Vaccinations are known to protect against pathogens such as bacteria or viruses.

Life Sciences - 11.04.2017
Relocation of Proteins with a New Nanobody Tool
Relocation of Proteins with a New Nanobody Tool
Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have developed a new method by which proteins can be transported to a new location in a cell. The novel tool enables scientists to study the function of proteins depending on their position by using nanobodies. The tool can be used for a wide range of proteins and in various areas of developmental biology.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.03.2017
Cut the long story short - and stitch it back together
Cut the long story short - and stitch it back together
Media releases, information for representatives of the media Media Relations (E) A species of unicellular ciliate has found a special trick to make use of the cellular machinery in seemingly impossible ways.

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.03.2017
Spiders Eat 400-800 Million Tons of Prey Every Year
Spiders Eat 400-800 Million Tons of Prey Every Year
It has long been suspected that spiders are one of the most important groups of predators of insects.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.03.2017
Joint Efforts Towards Treating Paralysis
EPFL scientists Stéphanie Lacour and Grégoire Courtine report on the status of their research and share their vision about the future of wearable neuroprosthetics at this year's edition of South by South West in Austin, Texas, on March 12 th .

Life Sciences - Physics - 10.03.2017
New professors appointed
New professors appointed
The ETH Board appointed three new professors and awarded the title of Professor to five recipients upon application of ETH President Lino Guzzella At its meeting of 8/9 March 2017, the ETH Board appo

Life Sciences - Innovation / Technology - 10.03.2017

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 01.03.2017
Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells
Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells
Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 28.02.2017
Stem cells derived neuronal networks grown on a chip as an alternative to animal testing
Stem cells derived neuronal networks grown on a chip as an alternative to animal testing
Media releases, information for representatives of the media Media Relations (E) Scientists at the Institute for Infectious Diseases, University of Bern have developed an in vitro stem cell-based bio

Computer Science / Telecom - Life Sciences - 17.02.2017
Six-Legged Robots Faster Than Nature-Inspired Gait
Six-Legged Robots Faster Than Nature-Inspired Gait
Researchers at EPFL and UNIL have discovered a faster and more efficient gait, never observed in nature, for six-legged robots walking on flat ground. Bio-inspired gaits - less efficient for robots - are used by real insects since they have adhesive pads to walk in three dimensions. The results provide novel approaches for roboticists and new information to biologists.

Life Sciences - Innovation / Technology - 31.01.2017
In cold water
In cold water
Martin Ostermaier wanted to break out of the comfort zone of science. Now, instead of pipettes, the biochemist is dealing with investors and patent law.

Life Sciences - Business / Economics - 30.01.2017
The Attraction Effect: how our Brains Can Be Influenced
The Attraction Effect: how our Brains Can Be Influenced
The decisions we make are influenced by other possibilities that we did not choose. At the same time, the options we missed out on determine our satisfaction with the outcomes of situations we were unable to control. Psychologists from the University of Basel conducted two experiments: first, they studied the decision-making behavior of students and, second, they measured brain activity and satisfaction when a set of possibilities is supplemented with another alternative.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.01.2017
Immune Defense Without Collateral Damage
Immune Defense Without Collateral Damage
Researchers from the University of Basel in Switzerland have clarified the role of the enzyme MPO. In fighting infections, this enzyme, which gives pus its greenish color, produces a highly aggressive acid that can kill pathogens without damaging the surrounding tissue. In the human body's fight against bacterial pathogens, white blood cells are in the front line.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.01.2017
Cell fate regulation by LIN41: activity determined by binding location
Helge Großhans and his group at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research (FMI) have elucidated the mode of action of the RNA-binding protein and stem cell factor LIN41. In an animal model, they showed that LIN41 silences four specific mRNAs, by two distinct mechanisms. They found that the choice of mechanism is determined by where on the mRNA LIN41 binds.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.01.2017

Health - Life Sciences - 06.01.2017
Autoimmunity and Infections: When the Body Fights Itself
Basel-based doctors are on the trail of a possible connection between autoimmune diseases and infections: errors can occur when immune cells absorb certain proteins from pathogen cells. These It is already known that there is a connection between infections and autoimmunity - the inability of an organism to recognize parts of its own body as “self”.

Life Sciences - Innovation / Technology - 03.01.2017
Looking back at 2016 (2/2)
Looking back at 2016 (2/2)
Slowing the aging process, improving data security, enabling paraplegics to walk again, transporting vaccines at room temperature to warm countries, creating jobs with the CHF 400 million raised by spin-offs - those are just some of the many areas where EPFL scientists have made a lasting contribution.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.12.2016
Looking back at 2016 (1/2)
Looking back at 2016 (1/2)
Health, energy, maths and chocolate: no field of research has been neglected last year by EPFL's scientists.  Cheaper solar cells with 20.2% efficiency Some of the most promising solar cells today use light-harvesting films made from perovskites. However, perovskite-based solar cells use expensive ‘hole-transporting' materials, whose function is to move the positive charges that are generated when light hits the perovskite film.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.12.2016
Re-emergence of Syphilis Traced to Pandemic Strain Cluster
Re-emergence of Syphilis Traced to Pandemic Strain Cluster
Syphilis has plagued humankind for over 500 years. After the first reported outbreaks struck Europe in 1495, the disease spread rapidly to other continents and swelled to a global pandemic. When treatment with the antibiotic penicillin became available in the mid-twentieth century, infection rates started to decrease dramatically.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.12.2016
Researchers uncover protein-based ‘cancer signature'
Researchers uncover protein-based ‘cancer signature’
A research team at the University of Basel's Biozentrum has investigated the expression of ribosomal proteins in a wide range of human tissues including tumors and discovered a cancer type specific signature. As the researchers report in ‘Genome Biology' this ‘cancer signature' could potentially be used to predict the progression of the disease.

Life Sciences - 02.12.2016
Evaluation of scientific rigor in animal research
Media releases, information for representatives of the media Media Relations (E) In the course of the ‘reproducibility crisis' in biomedical research, scientific rigor in animal reserach, and thus the ethical justification of animal experiments, has also been questioned. Commissioned by the Swiss Federal Food Safety and Veterinary Office (FSVO), researchers from the University of Bern have assessed scientific rigor in animal experimentation in Switzerland.

Life Sciences - 26.11.2016
Discover your brain at planète santé
Discover your brain at planète santé
What does it feel like to recover from brain damage? Have you ever tricked your senses into sensing one thing but experiencing something entirely different? Walk inside a huge inflatable brain and play with optical illusions.

Life Sciences - 17.11.2016
Walking is bound hand and foot: How long projecting neurons couple the movement of our limbs
Walking is bound hand and foot: How long projecting neurons couple the movement of our limbs
We humans walk with our feet. This is true, but not entirely. Walking, as part of locomotion, is a coordinated whole-body movement that involves both the arms and legs. Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel and the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research have identified different subpopulations of neurons in the spinal cord with long projections.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.11.2016
Drosophila innate immunity: another piece to the puzzle
Drosophila innate immunity: another piece to the puzzle
EPFL scientists have discovered a new receptor in the fruit fly immune system that detects bacterial infections. The finding opens up clues for our own immune responses. Our immune system has two phases: innate and adaptive. The first phase, innate, refers to the immediate defense mechanisms such as skin, blood chemicals and certain types of immune cells that constantly fight off foreign organisms to keep them from infecting us.