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Life Sciences - Health - 03.11.2017
Reading our brain chemistry
Reading our brain chemistry
Researchers at EPFL†have developed a new device and analysis method that let doctors measure the neurochemicals in a patient's brain. The† Microsystems Laboratory 4 (LMIS4)'s†system involves collecting microdroplets of cerebral fluid and analyzing them to obtain chemical data that can help doctors diagnose and treat neurodegenerative diseases.

Environment - Life Sciences - 03.11.2017
Mapping Functional Diversity of Forests with Remote Sensing
Mapping Functional Diversity of Forests with Remote Sensing
Ecological studies have demonstrated positive relationships between plant diversity and ecosystem functioning. Forests with higher functional diversity are generally more productive and stable over long timescales than less diverse forests. Diverse plant communities show increased resource use efficiency and utilization, enhanced ecosystem productivity and stability and can better cope with changing environmental conditions - an insurance effect of biodiversity.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.11.2017
UZH Anthropologists Describe Third Orangutan Species
Two species of Indonesian orangutans had previously been officially described and recognized - the Pongo abelii , living on the island of Sumatra, and the Pongo pygmeaeus , endemic to Borneo. In 1997, researchers at the Australian National University discovered an isolated population of orangutans in Batang Toru, a region within the three Tapanuli districts in North Sumatra.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 02.11.2017
Novartis and Amgen announce expanded collaboration with Banner Alzheimer’s Institute in pioneering prevention program
Parties to collaborate on a new Generation Study 2, assessing whether investigational drug CNP520 can prevent or delay the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD)   Clinical trial is part of the Generation Program, which includes cognitively healthy people at genetic risk of developing AD   Generation Study 2 aims to include a broader high-risk population, as compared to the ongoing Generation Study 1        44 million people globally are e

Health - Life Sciences - 02.11.2017
How Caries-Causing Bacteria Can Survive in Dental Plaque
How Caries-Causing Bacteria Can Survive in Dental Plaque
Extracellular polysaccharides play a central role in the survival capabilities of caries-causing bacteria in dental plaque, report researchers from the University of Basel's Preventative Dentistry and Oral Microbiology Clinic and Department of Biomedical Engineering in the journal Plos One. Cariogenic bacteria live in biofilm and attack dental enamel by converting sugar and starch into acids that dissolve out calcium from the enamel.

Life Sciences - 30.10.2017
Important Mechanism of Epigenetic Gene Regulation Identified
DNA contains the blueprint of an entire organism. Based on the information in this blueprint, every cell knows what it must become and what function it must perform. Throughout the entire lifespan of an organism, the genetic information has to be read correctly to ensure that genes are active at the right time and in the right cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.10.2017
Advanced artificial limbs mapped in the brain
Advanced artificial limbs mapped in the brain
EPFL scientists from the Center for Neuroprosthetics have used functional MRI to show how the brain re-maps motor and sensory pathways following targeted motor and sensory reinnervation (TMSR), a neuroprosthetic approach where residual limb nerves are rerouted towards intact muscles and skin regions to control a robotic limb.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.10.2017
Bacteria Have a Sense of Touch
Bacteria Have a Sense of Touch
Although bacteria have no sensory organs in the classical sense, they are still masters in perceiving their environment. A research group at the University of Basel's Biozentrum has now discovered that bacteria not only respond to chemical signals, but also possess a sense of touch. In their recent publication in "Science", the researchers demonstrate how bacteria recognize surfaces and respond to this mechanical stimulus within seconds.

Environment - Life Sciences - 25.10.2017
Developing a
Developing a "gravitational theory" for ecology
An important breakthrough by EPFL researchers could lead to the discovery of a set of general laws applicable to the environmental sciences. Is there a link between a given species' body mass and its abundance, or between the size of an ecosystem and its level of biodiversity? Ecologists often find that similar relationships of this type exist in different ecosystems.

Environment - Life Sciences - 24.10.2017
Tracking a parasite that's ravaging fish
Tracking a parasite that's ravaging fish
In Switzerland - not to mention the rest of Europe and the United States - freshwater fish are falling victim to a deadly disease that is rampant in the summer and dormant in the winter. It is caused by a parasite that thrives in rivers and attacks salmonid fish in particular. Researchers from EPFL, EAWAG and FIWI have come up with a mathematical model for predicting outbreaks as part of a three-year joint research program.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.10.2017
High-Speed Locomotion Neurons Found in the Brainstem
High-Speed Locomotion Neurons Found in the Brainstem
A clearly defined subpopulation of neurons in the brainstem is essential to execute locomotion at high speeds. Interestingly, these high-speed neurons are intermingled with others that can elicit immediate stopping. How defined groups of brainstem neurons can regulate important aspects of full motor programs, reports a study by researchers of the Biozentrum at the University of Basel and the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research (FMI).

Life Sciences - Innovation - 20.10.2017
Embark on a cognitive revolution at EPFL
Use your brainwaves to control the workings of a machine and contribute to science at EPFL ArtLab's next art-science exhibition, "Mental Work" from October 27 th - February 11 th , 2018.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.10.2017
Roche to present new OCREVUS (ocrelizumab) efficacy and safety data in relapsing and primary progressive forms of multiple sclerosis at ECTRIMS
Roche to present new OCREVUS (ocrelizumab) efficacy and safety data in relapsing and primary progressive forms of multiple sclerosis at ECTRIMS Largest body of OCREVUS data presented at a congress to

Life Sciences - 05.10.2017

Physics - Life Sciences - 04.10.2017
Highlighting the significance of structural analysis of biomolecules
Highlighting the significance of structural analysis of biomolecules
The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2017 has been awarded to Jacques Dubochet of Switzerland, U.S.-based German scientist Joachim Frank, and Richard Henderson of the United Kingdom for the development of structural analysis of single biological molecules by means of cryo-electron microscopy.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.10.2017
Clumps as temporary storage
Clumps as temporary storage
Researchers at ETH have discovered that the formation of protein aggregates in yeast cells is reversible. This casts new light on human diseases that can be attributed to certain protein aggregates. Protein aggregates have a bad reputation. A number of human diseases, especially those of the nervous system, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), are due to the clumping of degenerate proteins in nerve cells, creating aggregates that the cells cannot dissolve.

Environment - Life Sciences - 29.09.2017
5 professors appointed
At its meeting of 28 September 2017, the ETH Board appointed 5 new professors upon application of ETH Zurich President Lino Guzzella.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.09.2017
New regulator for liver regeneration
New regulator for liver regeneration
By performing large-scale proteomics analysis of liver proteins, ETH researchers have discovered a protein that is essential for liver regeneration. They have also figured out the mechanism of the protein's function. The liver is a wonderful thing: it's the only organ able to fully regenerate with no scar tissue formation, even after major injury.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.09.2017
A brain-system that builds confidence in what we see, hear and touch
A brain-system that builds confidence in what we see, hear and touch
A series of experiments at EPFL provide conclusive evidence that the brain uses a single mechanism (supramodality) to estimate confidence in different senses such as audition, touch, or vision. The study is published in the Journal of Neuroscience. Behavioral scientists and psychologists use the term "metacognition" to describe our ability to access, report and regulate our own mental states: "thinking about thinking", "knowing about knowing" "being aware about being aware", are all higher-order cognitive skills that fit this category.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 20.09.2017
X-ray and neutron imaging for palaeontologists and archaeologists
The interior of fossils and artefacts that are hundreds, thousands and yes, sometimes millions of years old can be examined at two PSI research facilities. A conversation with Federica Marone and Eberhard Lehmann, who are opening a new view into the past with their methods. Ms. Marone, Mr. Lehmann  -  palaeontologists and archaeologists regularly come to you to look inside fossils and ancient objects with your non-destructive analysis methods.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.09.2017
Tuberculosis Research Against "Super Resistant Bacteria"
To fall ill from tuberculosis remains a great danger. A research team led by cell biologist Sťbastien Gagneux at the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) examines the antibiotic resistance mechanisms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

Life Sciences - 05.09.2017
First Detailed Decoding of Complex Finger Millet Genome
First Detailed Decoding of Complex Finger Millet Genome
For many poor farmers in India and Africa, finger millet is a major staple food. The crop species is not only a rich source of minerals like calcium, iron, magnesium and zinc, and it contains many vitamins and essential amino acids.

Physics - Life Sciences - 04.09.2017
Like a Revolving Door: How Shuttling Proteins Operate Nuclear Pores
Like a Revolving Door: How Shuttling Proteins Operate Nuclear Pores
Nuclear pore complexes are tiny channels where the exchange of substances between the cell nucleus and the cytoplasm takes place. Scientists at the University of Basel report on startling new research that might overturn established models of nuclear transport regulation. Their study published in the Journal of Cell Biology reveals how shuttling proteins known as importins control the function of nuclear pores - as opposed to the view that nuclear pores control the shuttling of importins.

Life Sciences - Environment - 31.08.2017
Artists Target Ibexes
Artists Target Ibexes
The video and sound installations, sculptures, and pictures on display at the exhibition aim to build new bridges between art and the natural sciences.

Innovation - Life Sciences - 30.08.2017
UZH Life Sciences Fund Invests in First Spin-off
UZH Life Sciences Fund Invests in First Spin-off
CUTISS is a company with a vision: To use personalized skin grafts to heal people all over the world with skin defects, including burn victims.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.08.2017
Chronic Lack of Sleep Increases Risk-Seeking
Chronic Lack of Sleep Increases Risk-Seeking
Young adults have a natural sleep requirement of about 9 hours a day on average, older adults 7.5 hours.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.08.2017
New Test for Rare Immunodeficiency
Researchers at the University of Basel have developed a test to quickly and reliably diagnose a rare and severe immune defect, hepatic veno-occlusive disease with immunodeficiency. They reported on their findings in the Journal of Clinical Immunology. Rare diseases are often only diagnosed very late, especially since in many cases, diagnostic tests are not available or are only available in a few laboratories.

Life Sciences - Event - 21.08.2017
Basel Life: A Showcase for Europe's Life Sciences
Basel Life: A Showcase for Europe’s Life Sciences
Basel unites many strengths in life sciences: a strong university, strong industry and strong scientists.

Life Sciences - 21.08.2017
Fundamentals of life: How centrosomes direct early embryos
Fundamentals of life: How centrosomes direct early embryos
Summer Series: Sarah Herrman is visiting Pierre GŲnczy's lab at EPFL from the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.07.2017
Malaria Already Endemic in the Mediterranean by the Roman Period
Malaria Already Endemic in the Mediterranean by the Roman Period
Even today, Malaria is one of the greatest medical challenges worldwide, killing hundreds of thousands of people every year. In the past, people have adapted to the threat of malaria in various ways. These methods range from interventions in the environment like draining swamps, to genetic adaptations in the human body.

Palaeontology - Life Sciences - 26.07.2017
Large-Mouthed Fish Was Top Predator After Mass Extinction
Possible look of the newly discovered predatory fish species Birgeria americana with the fossil oft he skull shown at bottom right (Artwork: Nadine BŲsch) The most catastrophic mass extinction on Earth took place about 252 million years ago - at the boundary between the Permian and Triassic geological periods.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 26.07.2017
Neolithic Farmers Practiced Specialized Methods of Cattle Farming
Neolithic Farmers Practiced Specialized Methods of Cattle Farming
Swiss farmers practiced various different methods of animal farming as early as 5,400 years ago, as demonstrated by a study by researchers from the University of Basel, as well as research institutions from Germany and the UK. The study focused on the settlement Arbon Bleiche 3 on the south bank of Lake Constance.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.07.2017
Innate Reaction of Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Severe Infections
Innate Reaction of Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Severe Infections
If severe infections result, the body must form more white blood cells to fight off infectious agents. Hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow are responsible for their production. These cells, which renew themselves throughout a person's lifetime, form all cells of the hematopoietic system.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.07.2017
Smart walk assist improves rehabilitation
Smart walk assist improves rehabilitation
A mobile harness suspended from the ceiling is now equipped with intelligent motion analysis for tailored walking rehabilitation in people suffering from spinal cord injury, stroke and other neurological disorders affecting gait.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 18.07.2017
Low-dose diazepam can increase social competitiveness
Low-dose diazepam can increase social competitiveness
EPFL scientists have discovered how low-dose anxiolytics increase the social competitiveness of high-anxious individuals by boosting the energy output of mitochondria in an area of the mammalian brain that controls motivation and reward. Psychologists speak of anxiety in two forms: ‘state' anxiety, which refers to anxiety arising from a particular situation; and ‘trait' anxiety, which refers to anxiety as part of a person's overall personality.

Life Sciences - 12.07.2017
Obstacle course for caterpillars
Obstacle course for caterpillars
Spines and thorns keep hungry mammals at bay - or at least, that's the conventional wisdom. However, ETH researchers have now shown that spiky growths on plants make life difficult for caterpillars too. This finding could be important for crop breeding. "Caterpillars can occasionally be skewered by the spines," says Rupesh Kariyat, a scientist at ETH Zurich's Institute of Integrative Biology.

Life Sciences - 10.07.2017
Synapses in the Brain Mirror the Structure of the Visual World
Synapses in the Brain Mirror the Structure of the Visual World
The research team of Prof. Sonja Hofer at the Biozentrum, University of Basel, has discovered why our brain might be so good at perceiving edges and contours. Neurons that respond to different parts of elongated edges are connected and thus exchange information. This can make it easier for the brain to identify contours of objects.

Life Sciences - 04.07.2017
Praying Mantises Hunt Down Birds Worldwide
Praying Mantises Hunt Down Birds Worldwide
A study by zoologists from Switzerland and the US shows: praying mantises all over the globe also include birds in their diet. The Wilson Journal of Ornithology has just published the results. Praying mantises are carnivorous insects with powerful raptorial front legs that usually depend on arthropods such as insects or spiders as their primary prey.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.06.2017
Designed Proteins to Treat Muscular Dystrophy
Designed Proteins to Treat Muscular Dystrophy
The cell scaffolding holds muscle fibers together and protects them from damage. Individuals who suffer from muscular dystrophy often lack essential components in this cell scaffold. As a result, their muscles lack strength and become progressively weaker. The research team of Prof. Markus RŁegg at the Biozentrum, University of Basel, has now designed two proteins that stabilize the cell scaffolding link it to the muscle fiber and thereby restore muscle structure and function.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.06.2017
The gene behind follicular lymphoma
The gene behind follicular lymphoma
EPFL scientists have discovered an important gene whose loss lies behind follicular lymphoma, an incurable cancer. Follicular lymphoma is an incurable cancer that affects over 200,000 people worldwide every year. A form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, follicular lymphoma†develops when the body starts making abnormal B-cells, which are white blood cells that in normal conditions fight infections.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.06.2017
Bacteria Free Themselves with Molecular ‘Speargun'
Bacteria Free Themselves with Molecular ‘Speargun’
Many bacteria are armed with nano-spearguns, which they use to combat unwelcome competitors or knockout host cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.06.2017
Gene Transfer Keeps Bacteria Fit
Gene Transfer Keeps Bacteria Fit
Researchers at the University of Basel‚?‘s Biozentrum have discovered that Bartonella bacteria exchange genes efficiently using a domesticated virus encoded in their genome.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.06.2017
Boost for Zurich biomedicine
Boost for Zurich biomedicine
The Helmut Horten Foundation has supported Zurich's medical hub for many years. Now, a new donation to ETH will enable the strengthening of the Zurich-Ticino ‘health axis'.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 12.06.2017
Hidden patterns of brain activity
In a collaboration led by EPFL‚?‘s Blue Brain, scientists discover patterns of brain activity ‚'' never before observed ‚?- with the help of mathematics, providing insight into how neurons collectively process information. Brains of healthy rats that are the same age share many features, such as similar numbers and types of neurons present in the six layers of the cortex.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.06.2017
Uncovering the biology of a painful and disfiguring pediatric disease
Uncovering the biology of a painful and disfiguring pediatric disease
EPFL scientists have identified the biological mechanism behind the painful, potentially lethal, disfiguring Hyaline Fibromatosis Syndrome.‚? Image caption:‚?Loss of ANTXR2 leads to the accumulation of extracellular material in mice uterus and sterility (Left). Collagen 6 removal in mice without ANTXR2 restore uterine structure and function (Right).

Life Sciences - Health - 12.06.2017
Fighting fire blight and detecting Salmonella
Fighting fire blight and detecting Salmonella
ETH researchers have created an effective weapon against the plant disease fire blight and a new method for detection of Salmonella. Both are based on particular viruses that attack only one species of bacteria. The plant disease fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora , is dreaded by fruit growers.

Life Sciences - 09.06.2017
Ancient Bones Reveal Insights Into Swiss Wild Horse Population
Researchers from the University of Basel have, for the first time, studied how regional environmental changes influenced the populations of wild horses in Switzerland 25,000 years ago. Their results show: Contrary to the wild horses in the Eurasian steppe; the Swiss population grew considerably after the end of the last Ice Age.

Life Sciences - Physics - 07.06.2017
More concepts, fewer facts
More concepts, fewer facts
ETH biology lecturers have tested secondary school leavers and students to determine their knowledge of biological concepts.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.06.2017
New findings could lead to improved in vitro testing
New findings could lead to improved in vitro testing
EPFL researchers propose a new approach of performing in vitro tests on nanoparticles that could enhance a correlation to in vivo results. This involves reproducing in the lab the dynamic and fluidic variations that these particles experience in the human body. Before new nanoparticles or other nanomedicines can be injected into the human body, a whole series of tests must be conducted in the laboratory, then in living cells, and in the end on humans.