Zolgensma data including patients with more severe SMA at baseline further demonstrate therapeutic benefit, including prolonged event-free survival, increased motor function and milestone achievement

  • Nearly two-thirds of patients (65.6%) in STR1VE-EU have already achieved developmental motor milestones not observed in the natural history of SMA Type 1 at a mean duration of follow-up of 10.6 months, including patients with a more severe phenotype compared to previous studies

  • Two-thirds of patients (66.7%) were free of feeding support, an important indicator of stabilization/halting of disease progression

  • New interim Phase 3 STR1VE-EU data presented at WMS support the robust clinical evidence that have demonstrated a consistent, transformative benefit across Zolgensma clinical trials for the treatment of patients with SMA

  • Zolgensma, including some more than five years post-treatment and more than five years old



Basel, October 1, 2020 - Novartis Gene Therapies today announced new interim data from the ongoing Phase 3 STR1VE-EU clinical trial for Zolgensma (onasemnogene abeparvovec) that demonstrated patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) Type 1 continued to experience significant therapeutic benefit, including event-free survival, rapid and sustained improvement in motor function and motor milestone achievement, including for some patients with more aggressive disease at baseline compared to previous trials. SMA is a rare, genetic neuromuscular disease caused by a lack of a functional SMN1 gene that results in the progressive and irreversible loss of motor neurons, affecting muscle functions, including breathing, swallowing, and basic movement.1,2,3 These data as of December 31, 2019, and presented today during a virtual Clinical Trial Poster Session as part of the World Muscle Society (WMS) 2020 Virtual Congress, support the robust clinical evidence that has demonstrated a consistent, transformative benefit across Zolgensma clinical trials for the treatment of patients with SMA.

"We are seeing further evidence of the potential of Zolgensma to effectively halt motor neuron loss following a one-time, intravenous infusion. In STR1VE-EU, patients achieved rapid improvements in motor function following treatment with Zolgensma, and most have already achieved motor milestones not observed in the natural history of SMA Type 1," said Professor Eugenio Mercuri, M.D., PhD., Department of Pediatric Neurology, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. "These interim results are especially encouraging considering STR1VE-EU includes some patients with a more severe phenotype than in the START and STR1VE-US studies, further supporting the gene therapy’s positive benefit/risk profile, even in this more fragile population."

"These strong interim results from the STR1VE-EU clinical trial continue to demonstrate consistent and significant therapeutic benefit in patients with SMA Type 1, the most common form of the disease, adding to the robust body of clinical evidence for Zolgensma," said Shephard Mpofu, M.D., SVP, Chief Medical Officer, Novartis Gene Therapies. "With more than 600 patients now treated, including some more than five years post-treatment and more than five years old, these data further reinforce the transformative benefit a one-time dose of Zolgensma has on SMA patients."

Phase 3 STR1VE-EU Data as of December 31, 2019
STR1VE-EU is designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a single, one-time IV infusion of Zolgensma in patients with SMA Type 1 who are less than six months of age at the time of gene therapy, with one or two copies of the SMN2 backup gene and who have bi-allelic SMN1 gene deletion or point mutations. The mean age of dosing was 4.1 months and the mean age at the onset of symptoms was 1.6 months. The mean Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Infant Test of Neuromuscular Disorders (CHOP INTEND) score at baseline was 28. Thirty-one of 33 patients (93.9%) were able to swallow thin liquids, and 10 patients (30.3%) required feeding support at baseline. Nine of thirty patients (27.3%) required ventilatory support at baseline. STR1VE-EU is distinct in its inclusion and exclusion criteria and baseline clinical characteristics of enrolled patients compared with START or STR1VE-US. Specifically, some patients in STR1VE-EU had a more severe disease phenotype at baseline, including lower CHOP-INTEND scores and the need for nutritional and ventilatory support.

At last visit before the data cutoff, patients in STR1VE-EU were between 6.9 and 18.6 months of age, and mean duration in the study was 10.6 (1.8-15.4) months. Thirty-one out of 32 (97%) patients in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population survived event-free, including 30 (93.8%) who could have reached 10.5 months of age and 18 (56.3%) who could have reached 13.6 months of age. An event is defined as the need for tracheostomy or the requirement of