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Physics - 19.08.2022
Strong adhesion thanks to cavitation bubbles
Strong adhesion thanks to cavitation bubbles
Canadian researchers have discovered that they can stick hydrogel plasters to the skin very effectively using ultrasound. ETH Zurich professor Outi Supponen has now explained the underlying mechanism: imploding bubbles that form within the adhesive located between the plaster and the skin anchor the one on the other.

Life Sciences - 18.08.2022
Frogs Use Brains or Camouflage to Evade Predators
Frogs Use Brains or Camouflage to Evade Predators
How do frogs protect themselves from predators? Some species rely on cognitive predator evasion, using their large brains and strong hind legs. For species exposed to high predation pressure, however, this strategy takes too much energy, and effective camouflage to avoid being detected in the first place may be preferable.

Health - 18.08.2022
A coat of fat and sugar helps cancer cells to spread
A coat of fat and sugar helps cancer cells to spread
Changes to tumor cells during metastasis depend on certain molecules on the cell surface. Here, the importance of -glycolipids- in the spread of ovarian cancer has been deciphered by a Basel-led international team. These findings could pave the way for new treatment methods. Ovarian cancer is one of the most lethal cancers among women.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.08.2022
Monitoring gene activities in living cells
Monitoring gene activities in living cells
Researchers from ETH Zurich and EPFL are expanding the emerging field of single-cell analysis with a ground-breaking method: Live-seq makes it possible to measure the activity of thousands of genes in a single cell without having to isolate and destroy it. Modern biology is increasingly seeking to understand why individual cells behave differently.

Transport - Innovation - 17.08.2022
How do pedestrians react to automated vehicles?
How do pedestrians react to automated vehicles?
Empa, together with EBP and Fussverkehr Schweiz, analyzed in spring 2022 in Thalwil (ZH) how pedestrians react to automated vehicles. The automated parking assistant that had been used is the first system approved in Switzerland that moves a vehicle without a person sitting in it. The findings of the research project, which was co-financed by AXA's Foundation for Prevention, create an important basis for prevention measures and design principles for sustainable road spaces.

Paleontology - 17.08.2022
New 3D Model Shows: Megalodon Could Eat Prey the Size of Entire Killer Whales
New 3D Model Shows: Megalodon Could Eat Prey the Size of Entire Killer Whales
Megalodon, the largest shark that ever lived, is famous for its huge, human-hand-sized teeth. However, there is little fossil evidence of its whole body. International researchers in collaboration with UZH used an exceptionally preserved specimen to create a 3D computer model of its full body. Their results suggest that the megalodon could fully consume prey the size of today's killer whales and then roam the seas without more food for two months.

Life Sciences - 17.08.2022
Live-seq: sequencing a cell without killing it
A new technique keeps cells alive during extraction to track the activity of thousands of genes across time. The breakthrough method is called Live-seq and was jointly developed by scientists at EPFL and ETH Zurich. RNA sequencing allows scientists to study the expression of genes in a cell. Since messenger RNA (mRNA) is generated from a DNA gene, that information can be used to identify the original gene sequence and thus measure the activity of thousands of genes (i.e.

Health - 16.08.2022
Detecting diabetes among people at risk
Detecting diabetes among people at risk
A team from the UNIGE in collaboration with the HUG has discovered a molecule that can identify the development of diabetes before the first symptoms appear. Diabetes is a severe and growing metabolic disorder. It already affects hundreds of thousands of people in Switzerland. A sedentary lifestyle and an excessively rich diet damage the beta cells of the pancreas, promoting the onset of this disease.

Environment - Health - 16.08.2022
The unequal distribution of noise
The unequal distribution of noise
In cities, those who earn more are better able to protect themselves against noise and its associated health risks. This is shown by two new ETH studies conducted in Bern, Zurich, Hannover and Mainz. Too much noise is detrimental to health: it leads to sleep disorders, increased blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

Environment - 15.08.2022
Compound extreme events stress the oceans
Compound extreme events stress the oceans
When marine heatwaves and ocean acidity extreme events co-occur, it can have severe impacts on marine ecosystems. Researchers at the Oeschger Center for Climate Change Research at the University of Bern have determined for the first time the frequency and drivers of these compound events and have projected them into the future.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 11.08.2022
Fluoride in groundwater: global map shows all risk areas for the first time
Fluoride in groundwater: global map shows all risk areas for the first time
As an additive in toothpaste, it protects our teeth from decay. But when fluoride occurs in nature in larger quantities and accumulates in groundwater, it can become a hazard for our health. For the first time, scientists have produced a detailed map of global fluoride contamination in groundwater and shown which regions of the world are particularly affected.

Environment - Economics / Business - 11.08.2022
Extreme Heat and Drought Events Require More Systematic Risk Assessment
Simultaneous extreme heat and drought events have consequences in a variety of areas - for example the economy, health and food production. In addition, due to complex socio-economic connections, such extreme events can cause knock-on effects, researchers at the University of Zurich have shown. More systematic risk assessments are needed to make affected regions more resilient.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 10.08.2022
One more clue to the Moon's origin
One more clue to the Moon’s origin
Researchers from ETH Zurich discover the first definitive proof that the Moon inherited indigenous noble gases from the Earth's mantle. The discovery represents a significant piece of the puzzle towards understanding how the Moon and, potentially, the Earth and other celestial bodies were formed. Humankind has maintained an enduring fascination with the Moon.

Environment - Life Sciences - 10.08.2022
How best to promote biodiversity in vineyards
How best to promote biodiversity in vineyards
Researchers at the University of Bern have investigated how organic, biodynamic and conventional management in vineyards affects insect fauna. They were able to show that organic - and to a lesser extent biodynamic - management provides better habitat conditions for insects than conventionally managed vineyards.

Physics - Chemistry - 09.08.2022
In control of chaos
In control of chaos
Crystals consisting of wildly mixed ingredients - so-called high-entropy materials - are currently attracting growing scientific interest. Their advantage is that they are particularly stable at extremely high temperatures and could be used, for example, for energy storage and chemical production processes.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.08.2022
Hydrogel keeps vaccines alive
Hydrogel keeps vaccines alive
Most vaccines require constant refrigeration during shipment to remain effective. An international research team led by ETH Zurich has now developed a special hydrogel that vastly improves the shelf life of vaccines, even without refrigeration. The development could save many lives and lower the cost of cold chains.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.08.2022
Low addiction risk with medical use of ketamine
Low addiction risk with medical use of ketamine
By demonstrating that ketamine induces only a brief increase in dopamine and does not alter neuronal communication, a team from the UNIGE suggests that its therapeutic use may be safe. Commonly used in medicine as an anaesthetic, ketamine is also increasingly prescribed to relieve depressive symptoms.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 03.08.2022
Global Spread of Powdery Mildew through Migration and Trade
Global Spread of Powdery Mildew through Migration and Trade
The worldwide distribution of one of the most important cereal pathogens is the result of human activity. Researchers at the University of Zurich have traced the history and spread of wheat powdery mildew along wheat trade routes and found that mixing of genetic ancestries of related powdery mildew species played a central role in the evolution and adaptation of the pathogen.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.08.2022
First map of immune system connections reveals new therapeutic opportunities
First map of immune system connections reveals new therapeutic opportunities
Researchers of the Wellcome Sanger Institute and ETH Zurich have created the first full connectivity map of the human immune system, showing how immune cells communicate with each other and ways to modulate these pathways in disease. The immune system is made up of specialised cells, some of which individually travel through the body to scan for signs of injury or disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.08.2022
Improved COVID-19 vector vaccine candidate
Improved COVID-19 vector vaccine candidate
Scientists at the Institute of Virology and Immunology (IVI) and the University of Bern report on a Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV)-vectored COVID-19 vaccine candidate. Their work shows that intramuscular immunization of mice with VSV-vectored COVID-19 vaccines is inducing strong antibody responses against the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein if the vector has been complemented with a specific protein.
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