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Agronomy/Food Science



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Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 08.09.2020
Nationwide decline of threatened plant species in Switzerland
Nationwide decline of threatened plant species in Switzerland
The Swiss Flora is one of the richest and most diverse in Europe. However, more than 700 plant species are considered to be threatened. In a nationwide project over 400 volunteer botanists revisited known populations of all threatened and rare plant species in Switzerland and recorded their presence or absence.

Agronomy / Food Science - 26.05.2020
Wild Bees Fly for Research
Wild Bees Fly for Research
What stresses wild bees? Is it certain plant-protection products, the absence of nutrient-rich foods - or a combination of both factors? Together with research partners throughout Europe, Agroscope is investigating these issues. Of the total proceeds from agriculture in Switzerland, around CHF 350 million a year are only generated due to the pollination performance of honeybees and wild bees.

Materials Science - Agronomy / Food Science - 19.12.2019
Making chocolate colourful
Making chocolate colourful
ETH researchers are making chocolates shimmer in rainbow colours without the addition of colourants. They have found a way to imprint a special structure on the surface of the chocolate to create a targeted colour effect. By playing this video, you agree to the use of cookies by YouTube This may include analytics, personalization, and ads.

Agronomy / Food Science - Innovation - 22.11.2019
Engineering solutions for kitchen challenges
Engineering solutions for kitchen challenges
Crafty engineering can help solve many problems, including those we face in our own kitchens. At EPFL's Institute of Mechanical Engineering, students from three laboratories tackled some of the most common kitchen challenges as part of the first Kitchen-Inspired Engineering contest. Cooking the perfect poached egg is a lot trickier than it looks.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 19.09.2019
Dry run for cropping systems
Dry run for cropping systems
Globe magazine , News By: Michael Keller To safeguard the long-term future of agricultural production in Switzerland, ETH and Agroscope are investigating how resistant the country's crop­ping systems are to drought. The heatwave of 2018 was yet another warning to both farmers and the public on the effects of climate change: in the future, Switzerland will see less and less rain during the summer months.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 04.06.2019
A combination of insecticides and mite weakens honeybees
A combination of insecticides and mite weakens honeybees
Today, scientists of the Institute of Bee Health of the University of Bern and the honeybee research association COLOSS have published an article in the peer-reviewed journal Scientific Reports that shows a synergistic time-lag interaction between the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and neonicotinoid insecticides reducing survival of winter honeybees, Apis mellifera.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 29.05.2019
Chimpanzees Catch and Eat Crabs
Chimpanzees Catch and Eat Crabs
Chimpanzees have a mainly vegetarian diet, but do occasionally eat meat. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown for the first time that chimpanzees also eat crabs. In the rainforest of Guinea, the researchers observed how chimpanzees regularly fish for crabs. “Our study is the first evidence showing that non-human apes regularly catch and eat aquatic fauna,? says Kathelijne Koops, researcher at the Department of Anthropology at the University of Zurich.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 19.03.2019
New test method: Simulating in vitro what happens with proteins in vivo
New test method: Simulating in vitro what happens with proteins in vivo
Take protein - for instance, in the form of skimmed-milk powder - and put a pinch of it in a test tube. To determine how efficiently this dietary protein is converted into endogenous protein, follow the recipe described in the online science step-by-step in the laboratory. And voilà, the value of the protein, i.e. its benefit for humans, is revealed.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 21.02.2019
New Method Discovered: the Secrets of Lactose Digestion Revealed
New Method Discovered: the Secrets of Lactose Digestion Revealed
Around two-thirds of the global adult population cannot digest lactose - milk sugar - due to a deficiency in lactase, the enzyme that is required for lactose digestion in humans. Generally, consumers are unaware of whether they are able to digest the lactose contained in dairy products. However, Agroscope and Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV) researchers have now discovered a new method to measure the presence of lactase in the human body, and consequently determine an individual's ability to digest lactose.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 18.02.2019
EPFL promotes personalized nutrition with Food & You
EPFL promotes personalized nutrition with Food & You
EPFL's Digital Epidemiology Laboratory has launched Food & You - one of Switzerland's first citizen science initiatives on personalized nutrition. The study aims to create a digital cohort that will help scientists develop nutritional guidelines that can be personalized to specific individuals. Several studies over the past few years have shown that what constitutes a healthy diet for an individual depends to some extent on his or her physiology and lifestyle.

Agronomy / Food Science - 30.10.2018
Divona - Agroscope's New Disease-Resistant White Grape Variety
Divona - Agroscope’s New Disease-Resistant White Grape Variety
Bern, 30.10.2018 - Agroscope, the Swiss federal centre of excellence for agricultural research, is launching the first multiresistant white grape variety, Divona. The fruit of twenty years of research, Divona is resistant to fungal diseases, and well-suited for the production of high-quality wines - two characteristics that make it a popular variety for viticulture and winemaking.

Agronomy / Food Science - Pharmacology - 10.07.2018
The Impact of Diet on Health: Biomarkers Open the Way to New Discoveries
The Impact of Diet on Health: Biomarkers Open the Way to New Discoveries
Bern, 10.07.2018 - Do you remember what and how much you ate three days ago? This question, which people often struggle to answer accurately, must be addressed by researchers studying the influence of diet on our health. Agroscope has recently identified molecules indicative of dairy and soy product consumption in the blood and urine samples of volunteers taking part in nutritional studies.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 20.06.2018
Fat cells control fat cell growth
Fat cells control fat cell growth
Researchers from ETH Zurich and EPFL have discovered a new type of fat cell that suppresses the growth of new fat cells. This opens up new avenues for preventing obesity-related diseases. Obesity is the plague of our times. Some 80 percent of obese people will develop Type 2 diabetes at some point in their lives, and being overweight is also a significant risk factor for cancer and heart attacks.

Agronomy / Food Science - 05.09.2017
Combating Japanese Beetles with Fungi
Combating Japanese Beetles with Fungi
Zurich-Reckenholz, 05.09.2017 - In June of this year, the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) was detected for the first time in Switzerland, in the canton of Ticino. Considered to be a quarantine pest, it is subject to obligatory control. Agroscope researchers are testing whether this quarantine pest can be controlled with fungi that are effective against May and June beetles.

Innovation - Agronomy / Food Science - 05.07.2017
Naturalness as a success factor
Naturalness as a success factor
‘Naturalness' is a construct - but according to a new study from the ETH Consumer Behavior group, a product's success on the food market is primarily defined by whether or not consumers perceive it as natural. The increasingly artificial and virtual nature of everyday life has now achieved broad acceptance, and the benefits that technological development bring to everyone cannot be denied.

Agronomy / Food Science - 04.01.2017
Pigeon peas improve soil fertility
Pigeon peas improve soil fertility
By planting pigeon peas alongside maize, African farmers can improve the soil and their own nutritional intake.

Agronomy / Food Science - Social Sciences - 06.12.2016
Honey bee teenagers speed up the ageing process of their elders
Honey bee teenagers speed up the ageing process of their elders
Bern, 06.12.2016 - Honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies are complex societies, in which work is not distributed by a central power. How tasks are allocated among workers is still poorly understood. A research team from the Swiss Bee Research Center at Agroscope and the Institute of Bee Health at the University of Bern (both Switzerland), discovered that young adults influence this process by promoting older individuals to perform duties outside the hive, which shortens their life expectancy.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 09.09.2016
Secrets of honey-making by bees unveiled
Secrets of honey-making by bees unveiled
From never seen before X-ray images of honey bee combs, a research team from Agroscope and the Institute of Bee Health at the University of Bern (both Switzerland) could study how honey is produced. The team used computer tomography to measure sugar concentration in the wax cells, without disturbing the sensitive mechanisms of the colony.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 27.07.2016
Two neonicotinoid insecticides may have inadvertent contraceptive effects on male honey bees
Two neonicotinoid insecticides may have inadvertent contraceptive effects on male honey bees
Male honey bees, called drones, can be affected by two neonicotinoid insecticides by reducing male honey bee lifespan and number of living sperm. Both insecticides are currently partially banned in Europe. Researchers from Bern, Switzerland, together with partners from Thailand and Germany, call for more thorough environmental risk assessments of these neonicotinoids.

Agronomy / Food Science - Veterinary - 09.06.2016
Weak bees make strong colonies
Weak bees make strong colonies
Media releases, information for representatives of the media Media Relations (E) Colonies of the Eastern honey bee, the original host of parasitic Varroa destructor mites, survive infestations that are fatal to Western honey bees.