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Life Sciences - Health - 27.07.2021
More than just walking: a new role for core brain region
More than just walking: a new role for core brain region
For decades, a key brain area has been thought to merely regulate locomotion. Now, a research group at the Biozentrum, University of Basel, and the Friedrich Miescher Institut for Biomedical Research (FMI) has shown that the region is involved in much more than walking, as it contains distinct populations of neurons that control different body movements.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.07.2021
Brain fingerprints help doctors detect neurological disease
Brain fingerprints help doctors detect neurological disease
An EPFL scientist has found that brain fingerprints - or maps of the neural connections within our brain - can be used to detect a decline in cognitive ability. That's because the fingerprints are harder to detect in people who already have mild cognitive impairment. Just like our fingertips, our brains contain an embedded pattern that's different for every individual.

Health - 21.07.2021
Cancer: information theory to fight resistance to treatments
Cancer: information theory to fight resistance to treatments
Researchers from the UNIGE and the HUG have used information theory for the first time to monitor in vivo the development of resistance mechanisms to a cancer-targeted therapy. One of the major challenges in modern cancer therapy is the adaptive response of cancer cells to targeted therapies: initially, these therapies are very often effective, then adaptive resistance occurs, allowing the tumor cells to proliferate again.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.07.2021
In vitro Zoo helps in understanding SARS-CoV-2
In vitro Zoo helps in understanding SARS-CoV-2
A team of researchers from the Institute for Infectious Diseases (IFIK) at the University of Bern and the Institute of Virology and Immunology (IVI) have used a unique collection of advanced cell culture models of cells lining the airways from various domesticated and wildlife animals to determine which animals are susceptibly to SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.07.2021
Why do scientific discovery take so long to reach the general public?
Why do scientific discovery take so long to reach the general public?
SUMMER SERIES: HOW SCIENCE WORKS For scientists, the path from bright idea to finished product is a long one. Prototypes must go through an extensive testing and approval process before they are ready for the market. Let's have a look. The results of scientific research can often bring considerable societal and economic benefits.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.07.2021
Why do scientific discoveries take long to reach the general public?
Why do scientific discoveries take long to reach the general public?
SUMMER SERIES: HOW SCIENCE WORKS For scientists, the path from bright idea to finished product is a long one. Prototypes must go through an extensive testing and approval process before they are ready for the market. Let's have a look. The results of scientific research can often bring considerable societal and economic benefits.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.07.2021
New blood test measures immunity against SARS-CoV-2
New blood test measures immunity against SARS-CoV-2
The Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV) and EPFL teamed up to develop a new test that's sensitive enough to measure the amount of SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies present in the bloodstream. The scientists' discovery, published in the prestigious Science Translational Medicine , opens promising new avenues for tracking immunity acquired by infection or vaccination.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.07.2021
Machine-learning improves the prediction of stroke recovery
Machine-learning improves the prediction of stroke recovery
An international team of scientists led by EPFL has developed a system that combines information from the brain's connectome - the "wiring" between neurons - and machine learning to assess and predict the outcome of stroke victims. When blood flow to the brain is somehow reduced or restricted, a person can suffer what we know as a stroke (from "ischemic stroke" in medical jargon).

Health - Life Sciences - 08.07.2021
A 'molecular switch' turns on the unfavorable evolution of prostate tumors
A ’molecular switch’ turns on the unfavorable evolution of prostate tumors
Researchers from the Prostate Cancer Biology laboratory, directed by Giuseppina Carbone, M.D., at the Institute of Oncology Research (IOR, affiliated to USI) in Bellinzona, have discovered an unexpected mechanism that drives the largest group of prostate tumors' evolution, the ERG fusion-positive prostate cancers.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.07.2021
Researchers identify missing 'switch' that controls essential genes
Researchers identify missing ’switch’ that controls essential genes
Proteins known as transcription factors act as switches that regulate the expression of nearby genes, but the identity of some of these genetic levers has so far remained mysterious. Now, researchers from the Schübeler group have pinpointed a new switch that regulates essential genes in the mouse and the human genome.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.07.2021
Early detection of dementia
Early detection of dementia
Alzheimer's and other dementias are among the most widespread diseases today. Diagnosis is complex and can often only be established with certainty late in the course of the disease. A team of researchers, together with clinical partners, is now developing a new diagnostic tool that can detect the first signs of neurodegenerative changes using a sensor belt.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.07.2021
Covid long affects four out of ten people
Covid long affects four out of ten people
More than seven months after contracting the virus, nearly 40% of symptomatic people who test positive for SARS-CoV-2 still have symptoms, reveals a study by the UNIGE and the HUG. A study by Geneva University Hospitals (HUG) and the University of Geneva on the long-term follow-up of symptomatic individuals who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 has revealed that 39% of patients report residual symptoms seven to nine months after contracting the virus.

Health - Pharmacology - 02.07.2021
Cancer: immunotherapies without side effects?
Cancer: immunotherapies without side effects?
By identifying the mechanism of toxicity induced by immunotherapies, scientists from the University of Geneva and from the Harvard Medical School are paving the way for cancer treatments with fewer side effects. In recent years, immunotherapy has revolutionised the field of cancer treatment. However, inflammatory reactions in healthy tissues frequently trigger side effects that can be serious and lead to the permanent discontinuation of treatment.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.06.2021
Unlocking the power of the microbiome
Unlocking the power of the microbiome
Not only animals and humans host a complex community of microorganisms - plants do this as well. Researchers at ETH Zurich have recently published two new studies that shed light on fundamental aspects of these close - and often overlooked - relationships. Hundreds of different bacterial species live in and on leaves and roots of plants.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.06.2021
Managing attention deficit disorder by training the brain
Managing attention deficit disorder by training the brain
A team from the UNIGE and the HUG has found that a special type of brain training based on the principle of 'neurofeedback' enables people with attention deficit disorder to improve their ability to concentrate. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) affects about 7% of children, with a two out of three chance of persisting into adulthood.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.06.2021
Preventing the break-in of the toxoplasmosis parasite
Preventing the break-in of the toxoplasmosis parasite
Scientists from the universities of Geneva and Zurich and the PSI have identified the structure and functions of RON13, an enzyme of the toxoplasmosis parasite that is essential for the infectious mechanism in humans. Toxoplasma gondii , the parasite responsible for toxoplasmosis, is capable of infecting almost all cell types.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.06.2021
Microscopy Deep Learning Predicts Viral Infections
Microscopy Deep Learning Predicts Viral Infections
When viruses infect cells, changes in the cell nucleus occur, and these can be observed through fluorescence microscopy. Using fluoresence images from live cells, researchers at the University of Zurich have trained an artificial neural network to reliably recognize cells that are infected by adenoviruses or herpes viruses.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.06.2021
Pathogenic bacteria rendered almost harmless
Pathogenic bacteria rendered almost harmless
By identifying one of the mechanisms regulating the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a team from the University of Geneva is proposing a new strategy to combat this bacterium, which is resistant to many common antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogenic bacterium present in many ecological niches, such as plant roots, stagnant water or even the pipes of our homes.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.06.2021
Next-generation implants will be biodegradable and non-invasive
Next-generation implants will be biodegradable and non-invasive
EPFL engineers have developed a neural interface that disappears harmlessly in the body after several months and allows natural tissue to grow back. What's more, it can be implanted in a patient's blood vessel rather than inside the brain, thereby avoiding the need for invasive surgery. Some implants like pacemakers can last for years, while others wear out quickly due to technical weaknesses.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.06.2021
Slowed cell division causes microcephaly
Slowed cell division causes microcephaly
Scientists from the University of Geneva demonstrate how the mutation of a single gene can slow down cell division and lead to an abnormally small brain. The birth of a human being requires billions of cell divisions to go from a fertilised egg to a baby. At each of these divisions, the genetic material of the mother cell duplicates itself to be equally distributed between the two new cells.
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