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Health - 14.05.2021
How healthy is your digital twin?
How healthy is your digital twin?
Digital twins - a savvy combination of artificial intelligence and personal data - have already begun to revolutionize the way healthcare is provided. But they raise a lot of ethical and legal questions, especially given the vast amounts of medical data that must be collected to train artificial intelligence algorithms.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.05.2021
The Achilles heel of the Coronavirus
The Achilles heel of the Coronavirus
SARS-CoV-2 is critically dependent on a special mechanism for the production of its proteins. A collaborative team led by a research group at ETH Zurich obtained molecular insights into this process and demonstrated that it can be inhibited by chemical compounds, thereby significantly reducing viral replication in infected cells.

Health - Computer Science - 12.05.2021
Contact-tracing apps prove that they save lives
Contact-tracing apps prove that they save lives
A study published today in Nature shows that the NHS COVID-19 app for digital contact tracing, based on the DP3T protocol, averted between 300,000 and 600,000 COVID-19 cases in England and Wales. The researchers used data from the NHS to show and quantify the epidemiological impact of such privacy-preserving apps, which are now available around the globe to help control the pandemic.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.05.2021
Cancer cells hijack the 3D structure of DNA
Cancer cells hijack the 3D structure of DNA
Scientists have used a novel algorithmic approach on cancer cells to understand how changes in histone marks (H3K27ac) induce repositioning of chromatin regions in the cell nucleus, and described how modifications of local contacts between regulatory elements (enhancers and promoters) influence oncogene expression.

Health - Economics / Business - 07.05.2021
Regular virus tests can curb infection rates
Regular virus tests can curb infection rates
Since February 2021, the canton of Grisons is using saliva-based PCR mass testing within its mobile workforce as a potential means to contain the COVID-19 pandemic and reduce infection rates. Empa researchers are now leading the analysis of data from the first eight weeks of the testing regime. They observed a reduction in the incidence rate between 20 and 50%, depending on the business sector, and a noticeable reduction in the test positivity rate among those who were regularly tested.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.05.2021
Biomarker Detects Severe COVID-19 Early On
Severe cases of COVID-19 can now be detected at an early stage. Researchers at the University of Zurich have identified the first biomarker that can reliably predict which patients will develop severe symptoms. This can help to improve the treatment of severe cases of COVID-19. Most people who are infected with SARS-CoV-2 develop no or only mild symptoms.

Sport - Health - 06.05.2021
Exercise aids the cognitive development of children born preterm
Exercise aids the cognitive development of children born preterm
A premature start in life can cause problems even into teenage years. A study by the University of Basel and the University Children's Hospital Basel (UKBB) indicates that training motor skills in these children helps even when they are older. Children that are born before the 37 th week of pregnancy remain under close medical supervision while they are young.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.05.2021
Defective Epithelial Barriers Linked to Two Billion Chronic Diseases
Defective Epithelial Barriers Linked to Two Billion Chronic Diseases
Humans are exposed to a variety of toxins and chemicals every day. According to the epithelial barrier hypothesis, exposure to many of these substances damages the epithelium, the thin layer of cells that covers the surface of our skin, lungs and intestine. Defective epithelial barriers have been linked to a rise in almost two billion allergic, autoimmune, neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.05.2021
How mitochondria make the cut
How mitochondria make the cut
With the help of their custom-built super-resolution microscope, EPFL biophysicists have discovered where and why mitochondria divide, putting to rest controversy about the underlying molecular machinery of mitochondrial fission. Mitochondria either split in half or cut off their ends to self-regulate.

Health - Pharmacology - 03.05.2021
COVID-19 test detects antibodies in hundreds of tiny blood samples
COVID-19 test detects antibodies in hundreds of tiny blood samples
Antibody testing can be a powerful tool for tracking the spread of SARS-CoV2 infections, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. A group of scientists from EPFL, UNIGE and HUG have now developed a reliable and cheap antibody test that can analyze more than 1,000 samples at once and requires a small drop of blood, such as that from a finger prick.

Health - Pharmacology - 03.05.2021
Cheap COVID-19 test detects antibodies blood drops
Cheap COVID-19 test detects antibodies blood drops
Antibody testing can be a powerful tool for tracking the spread of SARS-CoV2 infections, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. A group of scientists from EPFL, UNIGE and HUG have now developed a reliable and cheap antibody test that can analyze more than 1,000 samples at once and requires a small drop of blood, such as that from a finger prick.

Physics - Health - 03.05.2021
A physics perspective on wound healing
A physics perspective on wound healing
Scientists from the University of Geneva and UZH have used a statistical physics approach to identify the lengthscales of key intercellular interactions which govern tissue healing. In material physics understanding how systems interact across the interfaces separating them is of central interest. But can physical models clarify similar concepts in living systems, such as cells?

Life Sciences - Health - 29.04.2021
A bacterial toxin facilitating chronic infection
A bacterial toxin facilitating chronic infection
Some pathogens persist in the body causing chronic infections. Researchers at the University of Basel have now discovered a mechanism of highly selective targeting of host proteins by a bacterial toxin that is critical for the bacteria to establish chronic infection. The study recently published in PNAS provides new insights into the activity and function of bacterial toxins.

Physics - Health - 28.04.2021
The shape of light changes our vision
The shape of light changes our vision
Scientists at the UNIGE have shown that the response of the retina to light depends not only on the intensity of the light perceived by the eye, but also on its temporal shape and the order in which the colours are organized. Vision is a complex process that has been successfully deciphered by many disciplines -physics, biochemistry, physiology, neurology, etc.-: The retina captures light, the optic nerve transmits electrical impulses to the brain, which ultimately generates the perception of an image.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.04.2021
The First Comprehensive Single-Cell Atlas of Human Teeth
The First Comprehensive Single-Cell Atlas of Human Teeth
Researchers at the University Zurich have mapped the first complete atlas of single cells that make up the human teeth. Their research shows that the composition of human dental pulp and periodontium vary greatly. Their findings open up new avenues for cell-based dental therapeutic approaches. During the last 30 years, medical and dental research has attracted a large number of scientists and practitioners working on aspects of high medical relevance that involve a combination of genetic and tissue regeneration approaches.

Health - Physics - 22.04.2021
Eliminating resistant bacteria with nanoparticles
Eliminating resistant bacteria with nanoparticles
Novel nanoparticles developed by researchers at ETH Zurich and Empa detect multi-resistant bacteria hiding in body cells and kill them. The scientists' goal is to develop an antibacterial agent that is effective where conventional antibiotics remain ineffective. In the arms race "mankind against bacteria", bacteria are currently ahead of us.

Pharmacology - Health - 22.04.2021
Stimulating the immune system with sponges made of silica
Stimulating the immune system with sponges made of silica
Silica nanoparticles developed by a team from the UNIGE and Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich have significantly increased the effectiveness and precision of immunotherapies. Immunotherapies are increasingly used to fight cancer and aim to stimulate the immune system to defend itself by destroying tumour cells.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.04.2021
Targeted therapies thanks to biomedical informatics
Targeted therapies thanks to biomedical informatics
The new "LOOP Zurich - Medical Research Center" promotes patient-focused therapies - for example in oncology and neuro-rehabilitation. To achieve its goals, the center brings together specialist knowledge in the fields of biomedicine, clinical research and bioinformatics from the University of Zurich, ETH Zurich as well as Zurich's four university hospitals.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.04.2021
Novel antibiotic deceives bacteria through mimicry
Novel antibiotic deceives bacteria through mimicry
Most antibiotics need to penetrate their target bacteria. But Darobactin, a newly discovered compound, is much too large to do so. Nonetheless, it kills many antibiotic-resistant pathogens - by exploiting a tiny weak spot on their surface. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now revealed the amazing mechanism at play and thereby opened the door to developing completely new medicines.

Chemistry - Health - 14.04.2021
New hydrogel can repair tears in human tissue
New hydrogel can repair tears in human tissue
Scientists have developed an injectable gel that can attach to various kinds of soft internal tissues and repair tears resulting from an accident or trauma.
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