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Life Sciences - Health - 13:00
New active agent against parasites
New active agent against parasites
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have identified a chemical compound that may be suitable as an active agent against several different unicellular parasites. Among these are the pathogens that cause malaria and toxoplasmosis. The point of attack for this promising substance is the protein tubulin: It helps cells divide and therefore is essential for the multiplication of the parasites.

Health - 14.10.2021
Swissuniversities warns of a medicine and research ban
The adoption of the initiative for a ban on animal and human experimentation would prevent biomedical research and new medical treatments in particular. The high quality of healthcare and responsible research in Switzerland to the benefit of the population and the environment are at stake.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.10.2021
Highly potent antibody against SARS-CoV-2
Highly potent antibody against SARS-CoV-2
Scientists at Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV) and EPFL have discovered a highly potent monoclonal antibody that targets the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and is effective at neutralizing all variants of concern identified to date, including the delta variant. Their findings are published in the prestigious journal Cell Reports.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.10.2021
A cryptography game-changer for biomedical research at scale
Personalized medicine is set to revolutionize healthcare, yet large-scale research studies towards better diagnoses and targeted therapies are currently hampered by data privacy and security concerns. New global collaborative research has developed a solution to these challenges, described. Predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory medicine, known as P4, is the healthcare of the future.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.10.2021
Financial rewards lead to higher vaccination uptake
Modest financial rewards can help increase COVID-19 vaccination rates. This is the conclusion of an international study co-lead by Swiss universities, based on data from Sweden. Despite countless appeals from politicians and scientists, stagnating vaccination rates hamper the containment of coronavirus.

Social Sciences - Health - 06.10.2021
Mindfulness meditation helps preterm-born adolescents
Mindfulness meditation helps preterm-born adolescents
The practice of mindfulness shows a positive impact of the intervention on the adolescents' everyday life and on their ability to react to new events. Adolescents born prematurely present a high risk of developing executive, behavioural and socio-emotional difficulties. Now, researchers from Geneva University Hospitals (HUG) and the University of Geneva have revealed that practicing mindfulness may help improve these various skills.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.10.2021
War in the gut: How human microbiota resist the cholera bacterium
War in the gut: How human microbiota resist the cholera bacterium
Bacteria in the human gut go to war in order to protect themselves against attacks of the "spear-wielding" cholera bacterium Vibrio cholerae or other pathogens, an EPFL study has found. Image: V. cholerae's growth and competition on natural surfaces (left). The framed area is zoomed-in on the right and shows the killing of a bacterium (indicated by the red arrow) by the two V. cholerae cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.10.2021
Simultaneous optical and electrical tracking of heart activity
Simultaneous optical and electrical tracking of heart activity
It is still elusive to what extent interactions between different cell types of the heart influence the normal heart rhythm and possibly trigger life-threatening arrhythmias. A new measurement method developed at the University of Bern combines for the first time optical and electrical recording of cardiac ventricular activation which, in conjunction with optogenetics, will permit finding comprehensive answers to these questions.

Health - Physics - 05.10.2021
Next-generation camera can better locate tumors
Next-generation camera can better locate tumors
Scientists at EPFL and Dartmouth College in the US have developed a system that can, for the first time, both pinpoint the exact location of a tumor and measure its depth. Their technology employs a high-tech camera developed at EPFL's Advanced Quantum Architecture Laboratory. A few years ago, Edoardo Charbon, an EPFL professor and head of the Advanced Quantum Architecture Laboratory, unveiled a new, ultra-high-power camera called SwissSPAD2.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.10.2021
A single gene can disrupt the sleep-wake cycle
A single gene can disrupt the sleep-wake cycle
A team from the University of Geneva has identified a gene that is essential for regulating the sleep-wake cycles of Drosophila. All living organisms are subject to an internal biological rhythm, which controls many physiological processes. In humans in particular, this internal clock follows a 24-hour cycle and occurs even in the absence of external triggers, such as changes in light or temperature.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.09.2021
New photoelectric implant controls the activity of spinal neurons
New photoelectric implant controls the activity of spinal neurons
A revolutionary implant developed at EPFL allows neuroscientists to activate or inhibit specific spinal-cord neurons by applying light at a specific wavelength. It will give researchers insight into how the nervous system works and the chance to develop new ways of treating neurological disorders. Grégoire Courtine doesn't hesitate to use the word "revolutionary" when describing the emerging field of optogenetics - a technology that uses pulses of light to control individual neural activity - and what it could mean for neuroscience.

Health - Psychology - 29.09.2021
An algorithm to predict psychotic illnesses
An algorithm to predict psychotic illnesses
Teams from the UNIGE and EPFL have used for the first time the method of longitudinal network analysis applied to children, in order to detect the symptoms that herald the development of psychotic illness in the future. One third of children with a microdeletion of chromosome 22 will later develop a psychotic illness such as schizophrenia.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.09.2021
Antidepressants Inhibit Cancer Growth in Mice
Classic antidepressants could help improve modern cancer treatments. They slowed the growth of pancreatic and colon cancers in mice, and when combined with immunotherapy, they even stopped the cancer growth long-term. In some cases the tumors disappeared completely, researchers at UZH and USZ have found.

Pharmacology - Health - 28.09.2021
Watching and analyzing T cells attack cancer cells in real time
Watching and analyzing T cells attack cancer cells in real time
A new assay developed by EPFL spin-off Nanolive opens up promising avenues of research for immuno-oncology treatments. It allows scientists to directly see and quantify how T cells find, bind, stress and kill cancer cells. Immuno-oncology is a promising new field of research that involves boosting the capacity of a patient's own immune system to attack cancer cells.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.09.2021
Decrease in mortality from rare side effect
A large-scale international study co-led by Inselspital and the University of Bern investigated the very rare adverse cerebral venous occlusion (sinus venous thrombosis) after administration of the Oxford-AstraZeneca and Janssen/Johnson&Johnson vaccines. Neither vaccine has been used in Switzerland to date.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.09.2021
Detecting dementia in the blood
Detecting dementia in the blood
Empa researcher Peter Nirmalraj wants to image proteins with unprecedented precision - and thus gain insights into the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's. This should pave the way for an earlier diagnosis of the dementia disorder via a simple blood test. Together with neurologists from the Kantonsspital St.Gallen, a successful pilot study has now been completed.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.09.2021
Improving leukemia therapy with targeted treatment approaches
In chronic leukemias, blocking the overactive kinase JAK2 by a targeted therapy approach is only mitigating the patients' symptoms, but cannot truly change the course of the disease. A study by the University of Basel has shown that it may be possible to improve the therapeutic effects by additionally inhibiting a specific signaling pathway.

Health - 09.09.2021
Statistics with a kick: Data analysis reveals cancer genes
Statistics with a kick: Data analysis reveals cancer genes
Researchers at the University of Basel have developed an analytical method to detect genes involved in the development of cancer. Using this approach, they were able to identify a number of new cancer genes, including one that plays a role in breast cancer. Tracking down as yet unknown cancer genes is the basis for discovering new targets for cancer drugs.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.09.2021
Natural Killer Cells Coordinate Wound Healing
Natural Killer Cells Coordinate Wound Healing
Natural killer cells do not just kill cancer cells or cells infected with viruses, they also mediate a trade-off between wound healing and bacterial defense in skin wounds. If the healing process is accelerated, the immune defense is weakened, researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown. This has relevance in treating skin injuries and in tackling antibiotic-resistant germs.

Health - Sport - 08.09.2021
Keep on moving: Sports relieve tumor-associated anemia
Keep on moving: Sports relieve tumor-associated anemia
Many cancer patients suffer from anemia leaving them fatigued, weak, and an impaired ability to perform physical activity. Drugs only rarely alleviate this type of anemia. Researchers at the University of Basel have now been able to show what causes the anemia, and that physical exercise can improve this condition.
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