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Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 28.06.2021
Optimising nature
Optimising nature
Today, molecular genetic methods can be used to breed sustainable crops - such as multinutrient rice. Researchers are calling for the risk of new plant varieties to be assessed not on the basis of the breeding method, but on the basis of their characteristics. When it comes to food, many people yearn for nature in its most pristine state.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 24.06.2021
Mixed cultures for a greater yield
Mixed cultures for a greater yield
What holds true for meadows would seem to apply to arable land, too: mixed cultures are more fruitful than monocultures. This was the outcome of an ETH Zurich research project led by Christian Schöb. Monocultures dominate arable land today, with vast areas given over to single elite varieties that promise a high yield.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 21.06.2021
A check-up for the ground
A check-up for the ground
Intense agricultural use is causing soil degradation in many areas. Now researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a rapid test for measuring soil quality on site. This should allow farmers to monitor the health of their land themselves in the future. Many of us pay hardly any attention to the ground and simply stride across it unseeing.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 01.06.2021
The waters of the Zambezi: time to act
The waters of the Zambezi: time to act
The Zambezi River Basin in southern Africa is a high-quality waterscape. But current rapid development threatens the waters of the Zambezi, particularly its tributaries. The challenge will be to ensure that mitigation measures keep up with population and economic growth to avoid degradation of water quality degradation.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 26.05.2021
Atmospheric inputs of nutrients to soil to decrease in the future
Atmospheric inputs of nutrients to soil to decrease in the future
The shift from fossil to renewable energy sources is essential for climate mitigation but will also significantly reduce the atmospheric input of the nutrients sulphur and selenium into soils. Sustainable solutions are therefore needed to supply intensively used agricultural soils with sufficient nutrients and to ensure a safe and healthy diet for the world's population.

Agronomy / Food Science - History / Archeology - 18.05.2021
Swiss farmers contributed to the domestication of the opium poppy
Swiss farmers contributed to the domestication of the opium poppy
Fields of opium poppies once bloomed where the Zurich Opera House underground garage now stands. Through a new analysis of archaeological seeds, researchers at the University of Basel have been able to bolster the hypothesis that prehistoric farmers throughout the Alps participated in domesticating the opium poppy.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 04.05.2021
Climate action potential in waste incineration plants
The climate action potential of carbon capture during the processing of biomass feedstock is considerable, ETH Zurich researchers have calculated. If this potential is to be fully exploited in practice, however, there are challenges to overcome.   Over the coming decades, our economy and society will need to dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions as called for in the Paris Agreement.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 19.04.2021
Biodiversity on Swiss Farmland Recorded Nationwide for the First Time
Biodiversity on Swiss Farmland Recorded Nationwide for the First Time
Many plant and animal species depend on habitats shaped by agriculture. Where and with what frequency do which species occur in the agricultural landscape? What is the state of their habitats? How effective are the measures taken to increase biodiversity? Agroscope's biodiversity monitoring programme 'ALL-EMA' records species and habitat diversity in the Swiss agricultural landscape.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 15.04.2021
From a Tweet to Forbes, The Diplomat and beyond
From a Tweet to Forbes, The Diplomat and beyond
Never did Jagannath Biswakarma think that a Tweet about one of his academic articles would receive attention from world-leading media outlets. Yet, that is exactly what happened and how his work was promoted internationally. Bioavailable iron is essential for all living organisms. Iron deficiency amongst plants influences agricultural production.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 11.03.2021
Targeted Imports and Less Food Waste Reduce 'Foodprint'
Targeted Imports and Less Food Waste Reduce ’Foodprint’
How can the environmental impact of our food be reduced? Agroscope calculated that the environmental impact can be improved if food is imported from countries of origin with especially environmentally friendly agricultural production systems. The avoidance of food loss and waste is even more effective in achieving this aim.

Agronomy / Food Science - Social Sciences - 02.02.2021
What did the Swiss eat during the Bronze Age?
What did the Swiss eat during the Bronze Age?
Scientists from the University of Geneva and UPF have analysed the skeletons of several Bronze Age communities that lived in Western Switzerland in order to reconstruct the evolution of their diet. The Bronze Age (2200 to 800 BC) marked a decisive step in the technological and economic development of ancient societies.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 12.01.2021
Airtight corn sacks help fight hunger during the COVID-19 pandemic
Airtight corn sacks help fight hunger during the COVID-19 pandemic
Optimised on-farm grain storage boosts food security in sub-Saharan Africa, as an ETH study in Kenya during the COVID-19 pandemic shows. As the end of the lean season approaches, things get tricky for many smallholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa. It's the time of year between harvests - the last one was a long time ago, but the next one is not yet due.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 19.11.2020
Too much nitrogen and phosphorus damages forests and water bodies
Too much nitrogen and phosphorus damages forests and water bodies
A factsheet from the Swiss Academy of Sciences (SCNAT) shows: Too much nitrogen and phosphorus is released into the Swiss environment. There they damage biodiversity, forests and water bodies, exacerbate climate change and affect human health. Actually the causes are known. With the help of Eawag researchers, the Swiss Academy of Sciences have collected facts on the problem of excessive nitrogen and phosphorus pollution in the environment.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 11.11.2020
Governments can curb over-fertilisation
Governments can curb over-fertilisation
Many countries could be using less nitrogen fertiliser in their agriculture without compromising their crop yields, as an international research team headed up by ETH scientists David Wüpper and Robert Finger are demonstrating. The world is awash with nitrogen. In agriculture, nitrogen is used as a fertiliser to increase output, but this causes one of the biggest environmental problems of our time.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 10.11.2020
Seed Treatment with Steam Is Effective Against Cereal Diseases
Seed Treatment with Steam Is Effective Against Cereal Diseases
Seed treatments aim to protect germinating crops from diseases. In collaboration with the agricultural cooperative fenaco, Agroscope examined thermal methods using steam and warm water, among others, for the treatment of cereal seed. The results demonstrate the great potential of these methods. In autumn 2017, the Swiss Confederation initiated a national action plan for reducing the risk of plant protection products (see below).

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 05.11.2020
Diversity Increases Yields and Protects the Environment
Diversity Increases Yields and Protects the Environment
Harnessing the forces of nature and agricultural practice in all its variety - that is diversification. Diversification brings benefits - positive impacts on yields and environmental protection. This is the conclusion of an international study in which Agroscope researchers took part, and which was recently published Advances.

Social Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 21.10.2020
Bronze Age herders were less mobile than previously thought
Bronze Age herders were less mobile than previously thought
Bronze Age pastoralists in what is now southern Russia apparently covered shorter distances than previously thought. It is believed that the Indo-European languages may have originated from this region, and these findings raise new questions about how technical and agricultural innovations spread to Europe.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 08.09.2020
Nationwide decline of threatened plant species in Switzerland
Nationwide decline of threatened plant species in Switzerland
The Swiss Flora is one of the richest and most diverse in Europe. However, more than 700 plant species are considered to be threatened. In a nationwide project over 400 volunteer botanists revisited known populations of all threatened and rare plant species in Switzerland and recorded their presence or absence.

Agronomy / Food Science - 26.05.2020
Wild Bees Fly for Research
Wild Bees Fly for Research
What stresses wild bees? Is it certain plant-protection products, the absence of nutrient-rich foods - or a combination of both factors? Together with research partners throughout Europe, Agroscope is investigating these issues. Of the total proceeds from agriculture in Switzerland, around CHF 350 million a year are only generated due to the pollination performance of honeybees and wild bees.

Materials Science - Agronomy / Food Science - 19.12.2019
Making chocolate colourful
Making chocolate colourful
ETH researchers are making chocolates shimmer in rainbow colours without the addition of colourants. They have found a way to imprint a special structure on the surface of the chocolate to create a targeted colour effect. By playing this video, you agree to the use of cookies by YouTube This may include analytics, personalization, and ads.
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