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Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, EPFL


Results 81 - 100 of 1200.


Computer Science - Politics - 19.10.2023
A new EPFL tool shows the decline of political tone in the US
A new EPFL tool shows the decline of political tone in the US
A new EPFL developed tool, Quotebank , has helped researchers provide the first large-scale data-driven evidence of a drastic shift towards a more negative political tone beginning at the start of Donald Trump's primary campaign in June 2015. A vast majority of Americans believe that the tone and nature of political debate in the United States has become more negative in recent years and more than half have the impression that Donald Trump is responsible.

Life Sciences - 17.10.2023
Decoding the axolotl: a new path for limb regrowth
Decoding the axolotl: a new path for limb regrowth
Researchers shed light on the axolotl's unparalleled limb regeneration abilities, challenging long-held beliefs and offering new insights into potential mammalian limb regrowth. In the serene waters of Mexico, the axolotl - a type of salamander - has long fascinated scientists with its remarkable ability to regrow lost limbs.

Physics - 11.10.2023
Unraveling the mysteries of glassy liquids
Unraveling the mysteries of glassy liquids
A collaborative study with EPFL builds a novel theory to explain the puzzling collective behavior of glass-forming liquids at low temperatures, a phenomenon with widespread implications in fields like material science and biology. Glass, despite its apparent transparency and rigidity, is a complex and intriguing material.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.10.2023
Rapid early detection of drug resistance in cancer patients
Rapid early detection of drug resistance in cancer patients
Parithera, an EPFL spin-off, has developed a system that lets doctors detect drug resistance in cancer patients early on, saving precious time and preventing the unnecessary use of treatments with onerous side effects. Drug resistance is a major problem in the treatment of cancer. Some cancer cells demonstrate resistance right at the start of a new therapy, while others develop it over the course of several months or years.

Chemistry - Physics - 04.10.2023
Ultrathin films achieve record hydrogen separation
Ultrathin films achieve record hydrogen separation
Scientists at EPFL have synthesized the first ever metal-organic frameworks membrane with thickness of just one unit cell. The ultrathin film yields record-high separation performance of hydrogen-nitrogen. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of materials that contain nano-sized pores. These pores give MOFs record-breaking internal surface areas, which make them extremely versatile for a number of applications: separating petrochemicals and gases , mimicking DNA , producing hydrogen , and removing heavy metals , fluoride anions , and even gold from water are just a few examples.

Chemistry - Physics - 04.10.2023
Ultrathin films achieve record hydrogen-nitrogen separation
Ultrathin films achieve record hydrogen-nitrogen separation
Scientists at EPFL have synthesized the first ever metal-organic frameworks membrane with thickness of just one unit cell. The ultrathin film yields record-high separation performance of hydrogen. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of materials that contain nano-sized pores. These pores give MOFs record-breaking internal surface areas, which make them extremely versatile for a number of applications: separating petrochemicals and gases , mimicking DNA , producing hydrogen , and removing heavy metals , fluoride anions , and even gold from water are just a few examples.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 03.10.2023
2050: 10 billion people need to be fed
2050: 10 billion people need to be fed
When it comes to feeding a growing population at a time of conflict and climate change, Mother Earth has a lot on her plate. To build a sustainable future we'll need to return to a farm-to-table model, and that's opening up vast and exciting avenues of research for scientists in an array of fields. In this special report , we explore some of the developments taking place in research labs and out on the farm.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.09.2023
A deep look into the progression of Parkinson's Disease
A deep look into the progression of Parkinson's Disease
Scientists at EPFL use cutting-edge imaging techniques to shed light on the progression of Parkinson's disease by studying how the main culprit, the protein alpha-synuclein, disrupts cellular metabolism. Parkinson's disease is a complex neurodegenerative disorder that leads to the deterioration of specific types of neurons in the brain, resulting in a number of motor and non-motor symptoms.

Environment - Economics - 27.09.2023
Toilets serve as concrete examples for industrial restructuring
Toilets serve as concrete examples for industrial restructuring
Through an innovative project in Sri Lanka, an EPFL researcher and a Sri Lankan researcher have demonstrated that construction practices in transition economies can operate more efficiently, sustainably and responsibly.

Physics - 26.09.2023
Making a femtosecond laser out of glass
Making a femtosecond laser out of glass
Scientists show that it is possible to make a femtosecond laser that fits in the palm of one's hand using a glass substrate. Is it possible to make a femtosecond laser entirely out of glass? That's the rabbit hole that Yves Bellouard , head of EPFL's Galatea Laboratory, went down after years of spending hours - and hours - aligning femtosecond lasers for lab experiments.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.09.2023
The dance of organ positioning: a tango of three proteins
The dance of organ positioning: a tango of three proteins
Researchers uncover an intricate protein network controlling asymmetrical development of organs in the embryo, providing insights into genetic disorders and fundamental biology. In order to keep track of their environment, cells use cilia, antenna-like structures that can sense a variety of stimuli, including the flow of fluids outside the cell.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.09.2023
Regeneration across complete spinal cord injuries reverses paralysis
A complete spinal cord injury leads to irreversible paralysis. Scientists at.NeuroRestore report in Science that they have developed a gene therapy that was proven in mice to stimulate nerve regrowth across such injuries and guide nerves to reconnect to their natural targets below the injuries in order to restore motor function.

Life Sciences - 21.09.2023
New imaging technique ’sees’ virus move in unprecedented detail
Scientists have developed a novel imaging technique to capture rapid protein dynamics. The technique, a microsecond, time-resolved version of cryogenic electron microscopy, allows them to observe the behavior of a virus in unprecedented detail. Proteins are the workhorses of biological systems, carrying out their work with extraordinary precision and speed.

Life Sciences - Innovation - 11.09.2023
Bacteria generate electricity from wastewater
In a breakthrough for the field of bioelectronics, researchers at EPFL have enhanced the ability of E. coli bacteria to generate electricity. The innovative approach only offers a sustainable solution for organic waste processing while outperforming previous state-of-the-art technologies, opening new horizons for versatile microbial electricity production.

Environment - 08.09.2023
The first climate strikes had an influence on Swiss residents
The first climate strikes had an influence on Swiss residents
A study by researchers found that Greta Thunberg’s Fridays for Future climate strikes have influenced the environmental behavior of Swiss residents. Climate activist Greta Thunberg made the headlines in September 2019 with her Fridays for Future climate strikes, in which some 4 million students in 150 countries protested to demand action on climate change.

Life Sciences - Innovation - 06.09.2023
Analog & digital: best of both worlds in one energy-efficient system
Analog & digital: best of both worlds in one energy-efficient system
The fusion of 2D semiconductors and ferroelectric materials could lead to joint digital and analog information processing, with significant improvement in energy consumption, electronic device performance, and lead to novel functionalities. We live in an analog world of continuous information flow that is both processed and stored by our brains at the same time, but our devices process information digitally in the form of discrete binary code, breaking the information into bits.

Physics - 05.09.2023
Thousands of new transformable knots
Leveraging results from knot theory and using physical simulation, researchers in the School of Computer and Communication Sciences (IC) have created a data set of thousands of different elastic knots that can be used in the design of new structures. Knots are used in all sorts of ways, every day. They ensure safety both indoors and for outdoor activities such as boating or sailing, are used as surgical sutures, as decorations and they can even be found at nano-scales in nature, for example in DNA molecules.

Physics - Materials Science - 01.09.2023
Peering into Nanofluidic Mysteries One Photon at a Time
Peering into Nanofluidic Mysteries One Photon at a Time
EPFL and University of Manchester researchers unlock secrets of nanofluidics using a 2D material and light. A discovery in the field of nanofluidics could shake up our understanding of molecular behavior on the tiniest scales. Research teams at EPFL and the University of Manchester have revealed a previously hidden world by using the newly found fluorescent properties of a graphene-like 2D material, boron nitride.

Environment - Social Sciences - 30.08.2023
Neighbors can influence your decision to buy solar panels
Neighbors can influence your decision to buy solar panels
An EPFL study carried out in Vaud Canton has shed light on the factors that can prompt people to buy solar panels. It found that having neighbors with solar panels plays a significant role, alongside more well-known influences, such as our social circle. If you're a homeowner, have a high-level job, and have friends or family members with solar panels, chances are that you've got them, too.

Physics - 25.08.2023
Unraveling complex systems: the Backtracking Method
Unraveling complex systems: the Backtracking Method
Scientists at EPFL and Charles University have developed a new method to analyze the dynamical, out-of-equilibrium properties of complex disordered systems, such as gold with magnetic impurities or opinions spreading on social media. In physics, a "disordered system" refers to a physical system whose components - e.g. its atoms - are not organized in any discernible way.