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University of Geneva


Results 81 - 100 of 235.


Life Sciences - Health - 21.06.2021
Pathogenic bacteria rendered almost harmless
Pathogenic bacteria rendered almost harmless
By identifying one of the mechanisms regulating the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a team from the University of Geneva is proposing a new strategy to combat this bacterium, which is resistant to many common antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogenic bacterium present in many ecological niches, such as plant roots, stagnant water or even the pipes of our homes.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.06.2021
Slowed cell division causes microcephaly
Slowed cell division causes microcephaly
Scientists from the University of Geneva demonstrate how the mutation of a single gene can slow down cell division and lead to an abnormally small brain. The birth of a human being requires billions of cell divisions to go from a fertilised egg to a baby. At each of these divisions, the genetic material of the mother cell duplicates itself to be equally distributed between the two new cells.

Innovation - Career - 09.06.2021
Innovation projects can reinvent the UN
Innovation projects can reinvent the UN
A study conducted by researchers suggests innovative projects carried out within UN entities can drive institutional change and foster a culture of entrepreneurship in the entire organization. Researchers at the University of Geneva demonstrate that innovative projects spearheaded by United Nations (UN) country offices are remodeling the institution and expanding its role.

Social Sciences - 03.06.2021
Bilingualism as a natural therapy for autistic children
Bilingualism as a natural therapy for autistic children
An international team led by UNIGE demonstrates that the characteristics of bilingualism allow autistic children to compensate for certain fundamental deficits. Affecting more than one in a hundred children, autism spectrum disorder is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders. It has a particular impact on social interaction, including difficulties in understanding other people's perspectives, beliefs, desires and emotions, known as 'theory of mind'.

Pharmacology - Health - 02.06.2021
Replicating patients' tumours to test different treatments
Replicating patients’ tumours to test different treatments
UNIGE Researchers have developed in vitro tumour models that incorporate components of the tumour and elements of the patient's immune system to test the effectiveness of treatments. Every tumour is different, every patient is different. So how do we know which treatment will work best for the patient and eradicate the cancer?

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 01.06.2021
Protecting the IQ of people at risk for psychosis
Protecting the IQ of people at risk for psychosis
A team from the University of Geneva has found that a class of drugs can protect the development of intellectual abilities in people at risk of psychosis, if prescribed before adolescence. One person in 2000 suffers from a microdeletion of chromosome 22 that can lead to the development of psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia, in adolescence.

Health - Pharmacology - 27.05.2021
Cell encapsulation could enhance antiviral vaccines
Cell encapsulation could enhance antiviral vaccines
A team from the UNIGE and the HUG has developed a new and effective anti-viral vaccination technique based on the cell encapsulation. Immunotherapy techniques developed in oncology to combat cancerous cells have great potential for fighting viruses. A research team from the University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG) and the University of Geneva , in Switzerland, in collaboration with MaxiVAX, a spinoff of both institutions, developed an innovative technology called "cell encapsulation".

Astronomy / Space Science - 25.05.2021
The Universe is hotter than expected
The Universe is hotter than expected
Researchers at the University of Geneva have succeeded in reconciling cosmological theory and observations of the Universe by considering that it is hotter than previously thought. Astrophysicists still encounter various inconsistencies between cosmological theory and measurements made with various research instruments.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 06.05.2021
Flooding might triple in the mountains of Asia
Flooding might triple in the mountains of Asia
A team of Swiss and international climate scientists has shown that the risk of glacial lake outburst floods in the Himalayan region and the Tibetan plateau could triple in the coming decades. The "Third Pole" of the Earth, the high mountain ranges of Asia, bears the largest number of glaciers outside the polar regions.

Health - Pharmacology - 03.05.2021
Cheap COVID-19 test detects antibodies blood drops
Cheap COVID-19 test detects antibodies blood drops
Antibody testing can be a powerful tool for tracking the spread of SARS-CoV2 infections, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. A group of scientists from EPFL, UNIGE and HUG have now developed a reliable and cheap antibody test that can analyze more than 1,000 samples at once and requires a small drop of blood, such as that from a finger prick.

Physics - Health - 03.05.2021
A physics perspective on wound healing
A physics perspective on wound healing
Scientists from the University of Geneva and UZH have used a statistical physics approach to identify the lengthscales of key intercellular interactions which govern tissue healing. In material physics understanding how systems interact across the interfaces separating them is of central interest. But can physical models clarify similar concepts in living systems, such as cells?

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 29.04.2021
How diet controls RNA maturation
How diet controls RNA maturation
Two UNIGE teams have discovered a new mechanism for regulating RNA maturation that depends on diet. Particularly sensitive to chemical modifications, messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are molecules responsible for transmitting the information encoded in our genome, allowing for the synthesis of proteins, which are necessary for the functioning of our cells.

Physics - Health - 28.04.2021
The shape of light changes our vision
The shape of light changes our vision
Scientists at the UNIGE have shown that the response of the retina to light depends not only on the intensity of the light perceived by the eye, but also on its temporal shape and the order in which the colours are organized. Vision is a complex process that has been successfully deciphered by many disciplines -physics, biochemistry, physiology, neurology, etc.

Pharmacology - Health - 22.04.2021
Stimulating the immune system with sponges made of silica
Stimulating the immune system with sponges made of silica
Silica nanoparticles developed by a team from the UNIGE and Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich have significantly increased the effectiveness and precision of immunotherapies. Immunotherapies are increasingly used to fight cancer and aim to stimulate the immune system to defend itself by destroying tumour cells.

Psychology - 20.04.2021
Our attention is captured by eye-glance
Our attention is captured by eye-glance
Scientists have shown that when we look at each other, our attention is focused on the social interaction, disrupting our perception of time. Eyes play an important role in social communication by expressing the intentions of our interlocutors, and even more so in times of pandemic when half of the face is hidden.

Life Sciences - 06.04.2021
How the fly selects its reproductive male
How the fly selects its reproductive male
Researchers from the University of Geneva have discovered a very small protein in Drosophila that plays a key role in how females select the semen that will fertilize its eggs when it mates with several males. Even a well-characterized genome, such as that of the Drosophila the so-called fruit fly, still holds surprises.

Psychology - Campus - 30.03.2021
Cardiorespiratory fitness improves grades at school
Cardiorespiratory fitness improves grades at school
By confirming the link between children's cardiorespiratory fitness and their school results, researchers at the UNIGE underline the importance of physical education classes at school. Recent studies indicate a link between children's cardiorespiratory fitness and their school performance: the more athletic they are, the better their marks in the main subjects - French and mathematics.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.03.2021
Cells rely on their crampons to avoid slipping
Cells rely on their crampons to avoid slipping
Researchers from the University of Geneva identified a new function for a protein that helps cells to sense their environment and dock at their proper place in the body. Each human being is made of billions of cells. In order to ensure his survival, cells must coordinate with each other and attach in the right place to perform their tasks.

Health - Social Sciences - 23.03.2021
Building resilience to COVID-19 and future pandemics
Building resilience to COVID-19 and future pandemics
An international team of scientists has drawn up a report on the resilience capacity needed by our societies to prevent, react to and recover from the COVID-19 crisis. The authors propose a path forward to shape resilient, inclusive, and sustainable societies. The COVID-19 pandemic triggered a global systemic crisis.

Life Sciences - 18.03.2021
Scaled, armoured or naked: how does the skin of fish evolve?
Scaled, armoured or naked: how does the skin of fish evolve?
Researchers at the UNIGE have traced the family tree of ray-finned fish in order to reconstruct the evolution of the protective structures of their skin. Usually scaled, the skin of fish can also be naked or made up of bony plates that form an armour, sometimes even covered with teeth. But how has this skin evolved over the ages? To answer this question, researchers at the University of Geneva , Switzerland, have reconstructed the evolution of the protective skin structures in fish, going back to the common ancestor of ray-finned fish, more than 420 million years ago.

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