New paper on inflammasome activation

The inflammasome plays a pivotal role in our immune system, essentially serving as an intricate alarm mechanism within our cells that combats infections and diseases. It springs into action upon detecting danger signals, such as infections or cellular damage, by initiating an inflammatory response to safeguard the body.

The inflammasome plays a pivotal role in our immune system, essentially serving as an intricate alarm mechanism within our cells that combats infections and diseases. It springs into action upon detecting danger signals, such as infections or cellular damage, by initiating an inflammatory response to safeguard the body. This process involves the release of inflammatory cytokines, signaling molecules that modify the behavior of other cells and mobilize the immune system to confront the threat.

The discovery of the inflammasome that initially took place in the Department of Biochemistry in Epalinges, now referred to as the Department of Immunobiology, illuminated the mechanisms by which our bodies detect and react to various threats on a molecular level. This discovery paved the way for new research directions in understanding how the immune system operates and how its dysfunctions can result in inflammatory disorders.

A new study in the Department of Immunobiology by the Martinon lab, led by Lotte Spel and Cyrielle Hou, has enriched our comprehension of this intricate system. They identified the HSP90?-SGT1 chaperone complex as a key regulator of the NLRP3 inflammasome, especially relevant to CAPS (Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes). By pinpointing a specific regulatory mechanism, this work opens the door to targeted therapeutic strategies. CAPS are hereditary disorders marked by excessive and inappropriate inflammatory responses. Gaining insights into regulating the inflammasome’s activity offers hope for more effective treatments for patients with these and possibly other inflammatory conditions.

This research underscores the continued significance of deepening our understanding of the inflammasome’s function in human health and disease. It builds upon earlier foundational research, showcasing how fundamental science can lead to significant advancements in diagnosing and treating diseases. The collaboration between the Martinon lab, the CHUV, and researchers in Genova, Italy, is a prime example of how international teamwork, encompassing clinicians and basic researchers, can expand our knowledge and enhance patient care.

Link to the paper: https://www.science.org/doi/10­.1126/scia­dv.adj6289