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Social Sciences - Health - 20.06.2022
The economic effects of Cannabis in Switzerland
The economic effects of Cannabis in Switzerland
A study conducted by the UNIGE and the consulting firm EBP reveals that the entire Cannabis system in Switzerland generates an annual turnover of one billion francs. Cannabis generates an annual turnover of around one billion Swiss Francs. This sum does not only contain production, import and trade in the shadow economy but also legal economic activity such as policing, the judicial system, social work and healthcare.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 24.03.2022
Popular Male Dolphins Produce More Offspring
Popular Male Dolphins Produce More Offspring
The reproductive success of male dolphins is not determined by strength or age, but via social bonds with other males. The better integrated males are in their social network, the more offspring they produce, a new study by an international team of researchers led by the University of Zurich has shown using long-term behavioral and genetic data.

Social Sciences - Health - 17.03.2022
The colored skeletons of Çatalhöyük
The colored skeletons of Çatalhöyük
An international team with participation of the University of Bern provides new insights about how the inhabitants of the "oldest city in the world" in Éatalhöyük (Turkey) buried their dead. Their bones were partially painted, excavated several times and reburied. The findings provide insight into the burial rituals of a fascinating society that lived 9000 years ago.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 09.03.2022
Connecting stress, weight, and social anxiety in early adolescence
Scientists at EPFL have found a biological connection explaining why there is an increased predisposition to develop obesity and being less sociable in individuals that have experienced stress during early puberty. Between the end of childhood and the beginning of adolescence, there is a critical window of time referred to as -peripuberty-.

Environment - Social Sciences - 08.02.2022
Citizen Science: Knowledge as a weapon in the fight for clean water
Citizen Science: Knowledge as a weapon in the fight for clean water
There is too much nickel, too much arsenic and far too much manganese. The research project by Désirée Ruppen, who is doing her doctorate at the aquatic research institute Eawag and the ETH Zurich, provides watertight proof for the first time of what everyone on the ground already knew. The Deka River in the Hwange district is heavily polluted by coal mining and the coal-fired power plant, and is a serious health risk for the people who drink its water or fish in it.

Health - Social Sciences - 08.02.2022
Altitude Positively Impacts Cardiovascular Health Peruvian Study Finds
Altitude Positively Impacts Cardiovascular Health Peruvian Study Finds
People living in high altitudes are less likely to develop metabolic syndrome, a key indicator of cardiovascular health. A study published today in PLOS One investigated the association between the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and the use of improved cook stoves in the rural Andes in Peru. While the use of these stoves was not found to be related to better metabolic health, body mass index (BMI) and altitude appear to be strong determinants of metabolic syndrome.

Health - Social Sciences - 03.02.2022
Analysis of 20 Years Finds Malaria Control in Young Children Saves Lives into Adulthood
Analysis of 20 Years Finds Malaria Control in Young Children Saves Lives into Adulthood
Tanzanian study of 6,700 children over two decades highlights new insights into the long-term health benefits of bed nets. Bed nets save lives in the long run, according to a 22-year study in Tanzania, which for the first time, indicates that children who sleep under them at an early age are more likely to survive into adulthood.

Social Sciences - Health - 03.02.2022
Childhood health and cultural inequalities: women pay the price
Childhood health and cultural inequalities: women pay the price
Scientists from the University of Geneva and Université Grenoble Alpes have shown that women from under-privileged cultural backgrounds are less likely to take physical exercise in adulthood. It has now been demonstrated that the socio-economic conditions in which children grow up in will have an impact on their health behaviour- particularly physical activity - in adulthood.

Social Sciences - Health - 02.02.2022
Mosquito nets in young children save lives into adulthood
Mosquito nets in young children save lives into adulthood
Bed nets save lives in the long run. For the first time, a study indicates that children who sleep under a mosquito net at an early age are more likely to survive into adulthood. This is shown by a long-term study over two decades with 6,700 children in Tanzania. The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine , followed more than 6,700 children from 1998, tracking them again in 2019 to find out what happened to them.

Social Sciences - Criminology / Forensics - 26.01.2022
Understanding Who Commits Which Crimes
Why do some young men turn to crime, while others don-t? An international study shows that preferences such as risk tolerance, impatience and altruism as well as self-control can predict who will commit crime. Risk-tolerant, impatient young men are more likely to commit property crime, while people with low self-control tend to commit violent, drug and sexual offenses.

Social Sciences - 24.01.2022
Cracking Chimpanzee Culture
Cracking Chimpanzee Culture
Chimpanzees don-t automatically know what to do when they come across nuts and stones. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now used field experiments to show that chimpanzees thus do not simply invent nut cracking with tools, but need to learn such complex cultural behaviors from others. Their culture is therefore more similar to human culture than often assumed.

Social Sciences - 21.12.2021
Relationship satisfaction at its lowest point after 10 years
Relationship satisfaction at its lowest point after 10 years
For most people, satisfaction in a relationship changes over time. Researchers at the Institute of Psychology, University of Bern have, for the first time, managed to identify typical developmental trajectories, both over a person's life span and over the duration of a relationship. The study shows that average satisfaction in a relationship is at its lowest at the age of 40 and after 10 years of being in a relationship.

Sport - Social Sciences - 09.11.2021
Taking Pleasure in Exercise Reduces Stress and Improves Life Satisfaction
Taking Pleasure in Exercise Reduces Stress and Improves Life Satisfaction
Young people are less satisfied with their lives when they are stressed. Physical activity can counter this by helping to relieve stress. Researchers from the University of Basel found that intrinsic motivation plays a key role in this regard. One in four boys and one in three girls feels stressed during their schooling, a study conducted by Sucht Schweiz in 2019 found.

Social Sciences - 02.11.2021
Motorways shape the sociology of cities
Motorways shape the sociology of cities
Researchers from the UNIGE and USI have analysed the impact of the Swiss motorway network on the evolution of household composition among the country's municipalities. The development of transport infrastructure is a central issue for states, which spend billions to connect cities. But what is their real effect on the municipalities concerned? Researchers from the University of Geneva and the Università della Svizzera italiana (USI) looked at the evolution of the income composition of the population of cities in Switzerland once they are connected to the motorway network.

Social Sciences - Health - 06.10.2021
Mindfulness meditation helps preterm-born adolescents
Mindfulness meditation helps preterm-born adolescents
The practice of mindfulness shows a positive impact of the intervention on the adolescents' everyday life and on their ability to react to new events. Adolescents born prematurely present a high risk of developing executive, behavioural and socio-emotional difficulties. Now, researchers from Geneva University Hospitals (HUG) and the University of Geneva have revealed that practicing mindfulness may help improve these various skills.

Computer Science - Social Sciences - 06.09.2021
Using video for the early detection of autism
Using video for the early detection of autism
Using artificial intelligence, a team from the UNIGE has developed a device for the early detection of autism spectrum disorder in children. Individuals affected by autism spectrum disorder often present communication issues and difficulties in social interactions. Although very frequent, this disorder is challenging to diagnose before the age of five.

Social Sciences - 09.06.2021
Language Extinction Triggers Loss of Unique Medicinal Knowledge
Language Extinction Triggers Loss of Unique Medicinal Knowledge
Indigenous peoples pass on their knowledge of medicinal plants orally. If their languages go extinct, valuable medical knowledge will be lost. A study by the University of Zurich estimates that 75 percent of the world's medicinal plant applications are only known in one language. Language is one of our species' most important skills, as it has enabled us to occupy nearly every corner of the planet.

Social Sciences - 03.06.2021
Bilingualism as a natural therapy for autistic children
Bilingualism as a natural therapy for autistic children
An international team led by UNIGE demonstrates that the characteristics of bilingualism allow autistic children to compensate for certain fundamental deficits. Affecting more than one in a hundred children, autism spectrum disorder is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders. It has a particular impact on social interaction, including difficulties in understanding other people's perspectives, beliefs, desires and emotions, known as 'theory of mind'.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 03.05.2021
Stress and Mental Health Problems During First COVID-19-Lockdown
One-third of children and adolescents experienced mental health problems during the first COVID-19 lockdown in Switzerland. Parents and young adults also perceived considerable stress, yet the perceived stresses differed from those of children and adolescents, the first Switzerland-wide representative study by the University of Zurich and La Source School of Nursing Lausanne has shown.

Environment - Social Sciences - 26.03.2021
Climate change significantly increases population displacement risk
Climate change significantly increases population displacement risk
The risk of people being forced from their homes by flooding increases by half for each additional degree of global warming, as an international research team led by the Weather and Climate Risks Group at ETH Zurich demonstrate. Every year, millions of people around the world are displaced from their homes due to severe weather caused by climate change.
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