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Results 21 - 40 of 213.


Computer Science / Telecom - 29.08.2018
Tough nuts, cracked intelligently
Tough nuts, cracked intelligently
Welding, printing, crushing concrete - an Empa team monitors noisy processes with the help of artificial intelligence. This way you can literally hear production errors and imminent accidents. Kilian Wasmer from the Empa lab for Advanced Materials Processing in Thun keeps shaking his head while speaking, as if he can't believe the success story himself.

Medicine / Pharmacology - 29.08.2018
New Findings about Diagnostic Tools for Malaria Elimination
New Findings about Diagnostic Tools for Malaria Elimination
Together with international partners, Swiss TPH conducted a study to assess multiple diagnostic tests intended to support malaria elimination. Results published yesterday in The Lancet Infectious Diseases found that rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) including a novel ultra-sensitive RDT, cannot replace molecular diagnostic tests to identify potential malaria transmitters.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 28.08.2018
Protein Modifications that Point to Cancer
Protein Modifications that Point to Cancer
Researchers from the University of Zurich can, for the first time, precisely characterize the protein modification ADP-ribosylation for all proteins in a tissue sample. The changes, which are a typical reaction to stress, provide information about the condition of a cell. Together with the University Hospital Zurich, they are now testing the new method to diagnose and treat cancer.

Environment - Chemistry - 28.08.2018
Reading signs from the past
Reading signs from the past
When water samples are analysed with a mass spectrometer, peaks of compounds appear that are completely unknown, or that weren't being looked for. If these compounds prove subsequently to be of interest to environmental researchers, evidence of their presence can be retrieved from the archived measurements.

Astronomy / Space Science - 27.08.2018
Jupiter had growth disorders
Jupiter had growth disorders
How Jupiter was formed? Data collected from meteorites had indicated that the growth of the giant planet had been delayed for two million years. Now the researchers have found an explanation: Collisions with kilometer-sized blocks generated high energy, which meant that in this phase hardly any accretion of gas could take place and the planet could only grow slowly.

Physics / Materials Science - Innovation / Technology - 27.08.2018
New mechanism of electron spin relaxation observed
New mechanism of electron spin relaxation observed
Physicists at the University of Basel are working on using the spin of an electron confined in a semiconductor nanostructure as a unit of information for future quantum computers. For the first time, they have now been able to experimentally demonstrate a mechanism of electron spin relaxation that was predicted 15 years ago.

Life Sciences - Environment - 24.08.2018
Cichlids: watching speciation in real time
Cichlids: watching speciation in real time
Cichlids belong to one of the largest fish families, with new species emerging all the time. These colourful, shimmering fish evolve so fast that Eawag researchers have now been able to practically observe them in the process of their evolution. Within the space of several thousand years, one cichlid can evolve into hundreds of different species.

Microtechnics - 24.08.2018
An avatar uses your gait to predict how many calories you will burn
An avatar uses your gait to predict how many calories you will burn
New avatar-based software developed at EPFL looks at how people walk in order to predict their energy expenditure. The software, originally intended for roboticists and for researchers who develop prosthetics and exoskeletons, could have many uses in both medicine and sports. It can be tested online through a downloadable app.

Astronomy / Space Science - 23.08.2018
New comet models thanks to
New comet models thanks to "Chury" data
The MiARD project (Multi-instrument Analysis of Rosetta Data) was a 30-month international research project led by the University of Bern to make the best use of the vast amount of data produced by the Rosetta mission. The most important results, models and an artistic project on MiARD have now been presented.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 23.08.2018
Increased phosphate intake elevates blood pressure in healthy adults
Increased phosphate intake elevates blood pressure in healthy adults
If more phosphate is consumed with food, blood pressure and pulse rate increase in healthy young adults. These findings were shown by a study led by the University of Basel and published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. They make processed cheese spreadable, prevent coffee from clumping and help preserve many meat products: phosphates are a common additive in industrially produced foodstuffs.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 23.08.2018
Iron and titanium discovered in the atmosphere of an exoplanet
Iron and titanium discovered in the atmosphere of an exoplanet
For the first time, researchers of the universities of Bern and Geneva have proven the presence of iron and titanium in the atmosphere of an exoplanet. The existence of these elements in gas form was theoretically predicted by a team led by the Bernese astronomer Kevin Heng and has now been confirmed by Geneva-based astronomers.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 23.08.2018
Dominant men make decisions faster
Dominant men make decisions faster
Men who exhibit high social dominance make faster decisions than low-dominance men even outside a social context, finds a large behavioral study from EPFL. Hierarchies exist across all human and animal societies, organized by what behavioral scientists refer to as dominance. Dominant individuals tend to climb higher up the hierarchy ladder of their particular society, earning priority access to resources.

Environment - 22.08.2018
Species-Rich Forests Better Compensate Environmental Impacts
Species-Rich Forests Better Compensate Environmental Impacts
To offset CO2 emissions, China is reforesting. If a mixture of tree species instead of monocultures were planted, much more carbon could be stored. An international team including UZH researchers has shown that species-rich forest ecosystems take up more CO2 from the atmosphere and store more carbon in biomass and soil, making them more effective against climate change.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 16.08.2018
How an herbivore hijacks a nutrient uptake strategy of its host plant
How an herbivore hijacks a nutrient uptake strategy of its host plant
The struggle for iron determines the fate of maize and insect pest: Maize plants release secondary metabolites into the soil that bind to iron and thereby facilitate its uptake by the plant. The Western corn rootworm, the economically most important maize pest worldwide, is attracted by these complexes, extracts the bound iron from the maize plant and uses it for its own nutrition.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 16.08.2018
India's excess fluoride in groundwater
India’s excess fluoride in groundwater
Fluoride occurs naturally in groundwater. In small amounts, this is usually not a problem, but in India the concentration in many places exceeds the threshold at which is starts to present a health hazard. According to estimates by Eawag researchers, based on new computer models, more than a hundred million people are affected.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 16.08.2018
The Wheat Genome Is Five Times Bigger than the Human Genome
The Wheat Genome Is Five Times Bigger than the Human Genome
Scientists have been able to sequence the complete genome of common wheat for the first time. The information will enable more effective measures to be taken to combat pests and climate stress in wheat. Wheat is the one of the most widely cultivated crops in the world and one of the most common type of grain.

Environment - Physics / Materials Science - 15.08.2018
Marine heatwaves are threatening ecosystems
Marine heatwaves are threatening ecosystems
Marine heatwaves can irreversibly damage ecosystems and, therefore, also present a threat to fishing. As a team led by physicist Thomas Frölicher from Bern showed in a study just published , the number of marine heatwaves has increased dramatically in past decades. This trend will further intensify as a result of climate change.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 15.08.2018
Amputees feel as though their prosthetic limb belongs to their body
In a breakthrough approach that combines virtual reality and artificial tactile sensations, two amputees feel as though their prosthetic hand belongs to their own body. Moreover, the scientists show that the phantom limb actually grows into the prosthetic hand. The famous idiom "seeing is believing" is not enough to help amputees with the use of their prosthetic limb.

Administration - Business / Economics - 15.08.2018
New Swiss Bank Note Dedicated to Science
New Swiss Bank Note Dedicated to Science
Swiss National Bank releases new 200-franc note. Fourth banknote in latest series showcases Switzerland's scientific expertise The Swiss National Bank (SNB) will begin issuing the new 200-franc note on 22 August 2018.

Life Sciences - Physics / Materials Science - 15.08.2018
Signposts for cells
Signposts for cells
For the replacement of animal testing with alternatives in medical rsearch, complex microtissues need to be cultivated. Researchers from Empa have developed a special polymer scaffold for threedimensional cell cultures. Light beams act as signposts for the cells. In pharmaceutical research, scientists try to do without animal testing wherever possible or replace it with experiments on cell or tissue cultures.