Category


Years
2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008


Results 21 - 40 of 209.


Environment - Life Sciences - 02.04.2019
Excessive levels of plant protection products in small streams
Excessive levels of plant protection products in small streams
Between March and October 2017, samples collected from five small streams with catchment areas subject to a variety of agricultural uses were analysed for plant protection products. The Eawag and Ecotox Centre scientists were assisted by five cantons and the Water Quality Platform of the Swiss Water Association (VSA).

Physics - Health - 02.04.2019
Harnessing photonics for at-home disease detection
Harnessing photonics for at-home disease detection
With nothing more than a photonic chip and an ordinary camera, EPFL researchers have managed to count biomolecules one by one in a small sample and determine their position. Their tiny device - a marriage of optics and smart image analysis - is even able to detect a graphene sheet only a single atom thick.

Environment - 01.04.2019
Climate Change Threat to Dolphins' Survival
Climate Change Threat to Dolphins’ Survival
An unprecedented marine heatwave had long-lasting negative impacts on both survival and birth rates on the iconic dolphin population in Shark Bay, Western Australia. Researchers at UZH have now documented that climate change may have more far-reaching consequences for the conservation of marine mammals than previously thought.

Chemistry - Physics - 01.04.2019

Physics - Chemistry - 29.03.2019
A compass pointing West
A compass pointing West
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and ETH Zurich have discovered a special phenomenon of magnetism in the nano range. It enables magnets to be assembled in unusual configurations. This could be used to build computer memories and switches to increase the performance of microprocessors. The results of the work have now been published in the journal Science .

Life Sciences - Health - 28.03.2019
Crime Scene Schizophrenia - 30 Genes under suspicion
Crime Scene Schizophrenia - 30 Genes under suspicion
A research group has identified 30 genes associated with schizophrenia. The team was able to show which pathological changes in the brain and behavioral abnormalities are triggered by these genes. The results of the study have now been published in "Cell". The research team of the Biozentrum, University of Basel investigated a total of 132 genes associated with schizophrenia.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.03.2019
Breast cancer: the promises of old recipes
Breast cancer: the promises of old recipes
Researchers from UNIGE and UNIL demonstrate the efficacy of a well-known antibiotic in treating a particularly fatal form of breast cancer, offering hope for targeted therapy. Of the three major subtypes of breast cancer, the «triple negative» is the most lethal: half of all breast cancer deaths are attributed to it, whereas it accounts for only about 15% of incidences of breast cancer.

Life Sciences - 27.03.2019
Lying, Sitting or Standing: Resting Postures Determined by Animals' Size
Lying, Sitting or Standing: Resting Postures Determined by Animals’ Size
Cows always lie on their chests so that their digestion is not impaired. Rodents sometimes rest sitting down, while kangaroos sometimes lie on their backs. The larger the animal, the less often it lies down, and when it does, it is more likely to lie on its side - but there are exceptions. A team from UZH investigated the resting postures of mammals.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 27.03.2019
An old neuroscience problem
An old neuroscience problem
Researchers from EPFL explain how the shapes of neurons can be classified using mathematical methods from the field of algebraic topology. Neuroscientists can now start building a formal catalogue for all the types of cells in the brain. Onto this catalogue of cells, they can systematically map the function and role in disease of each type of neuron in the brain.

Environment - 26.03.2019
Hurricanes going astray make for heavy rainfall in Europe
Hurricanes going astray make for heavy rainfall in Europe
Tropical storms that move poleward influence the weather in Europe much more than previously supposed. A study from the Mobiliar Lab for Natural Risks at the University of Bern shows that the probability of heavy rainfall is twice as high when mid-latitude weather is disrupted by cyclones. These findings could ensure better extreme weather forecasts in the future.

Life Sciences - Environment - 26.03.2019
Seeds inherit memories from their mother
Seeds inherit memories from their mother
UNIGE researchers demonstrate that maternal and environmental control of seed dormancy is carried out through novel epigenetic mechanisms. Seeds remain in a dormant state - a temporary blockage of their germination - as long as environmental conditions are not ideal for germination. The depth of this sleep, which is influenced by various factors, is inherited from their mother, as researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, had previously shown.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.03.2019
Combating fatigue with a smartwatch application
Combating fatigue with a smartwatch application
Scientists from EPFL, UNIL and local startup be.care have developed a system that uses heart rate variability to detect fatigue and identify what kind it is. The system then uses the results to suggest lifestyle changes that can make a difference. An initial test has been carried out on university students under real-world conditions.

Environment - 26.03.2019
Getting into murky waters: Blue-green algae produce toxic cocktail
Getting into murky waters: Blue-green algae produce toxic cocktail
Between spring and autumn, when the lakes warm up and the concentration of nutrients increases, all around the world blue-green algae are proliferating en masse. Switzerland is no exception, with the algae occurring in lakes such as the Baldeggersee or Greifensee. This may be problematical, as some blue-green algae, known scientifically as cyanobacteria, produce toxic substances.

Physics - 25.03.2019
In a new quantum simulator, light behaves like a magnet
In a new quantum simulator, light behaves like a magnet
Physicists at EPFL propose a new "quantum simulator": a laser-based device that can be used to study a wide range of quantum systems. Studying it, the researchers have found that photons can behave like magnetic dipoles at temperatures close to absolute zero, following the laws of quantum mechanics.

Life Sciences - 25.03.2019
A key player in the maturation of sexual organs
A key player in the maturation of sexual organs
Puberty is a period of extensive changes of body morphology and function. As much as we are familiar with these life-altering changes, relatively little is known about what sets the whole process in motion. Thanks to studies in the tiny worm C. elegans , the group of Helge Grosshans is getting closer to understanding how the onset of puberty is genetically controlled.

Life Sciences - 25.03.2019
Engineering cellular function without living cells
Engineering cellular function without living cells
EPFL scientists have come up with a systematic method for studying and even predicting gene expression - without using cells. Using their innovative, quantitative approach, they measured important parameters governing gene regulation. This allowed them to design and construct a synthetic biological logic gate, which could one day be used to introduce new functions into cells.

Life Sciences - 22.03.2019
Sound the alarm! How injured plant cells warn their neighbors
Sound the alarm! How injured plant cells warn their neighbors
All organisms can be injured. But what happens when a plant is injured? How can it heal itself and avoid infections' An international research team from the University of Basel and Ghent University has reported on wound reaction mechanisms in plants . Their insights into plant immune systems could be used for new approaches to sustainable crop production.

Earth Sciences - 22.03.2019
How fluid viscosity affects earthquake intensity
How fluid viscosity affects earthquake intensity
A young researcher at EPFL has demonstrated that the viscosity of fluids present in faults has a direct effect on the force of earthquakes. Fault zones play a key role in shaping the deformation of the Earth's crust. All of these zones contain fluids, which heavily influence how earthquakes propagate.

Physics - 21.03.2019
LHCb sees a new flavour of matter-antimatter asymmetry
LHCb sees a new flavour of matter-antimatter asymmetry
The LHCb collaboration at CERN 1 has seen, for the first time, the matter-antimatter asymmetry known as CP violation in a particle dubbed the D0 meson. The finding, presented today at the annual Rencontres de Moriond conference and in a dedicated CERN seminar , is sure to make it into the textbooks of particle physics.

Life Sciences - 21.03.2019
Robots enable bees and fish to talk to each other
Robots enable bees and fish to talk to each other
Through an imaginative experiment, researchers were able to get two extremely different animal species located far apart to interact with each other and reach a shared decision with the help of robots. Bees and fish don't often have the occasion to meet, nor would they have much to say to each other if they did.