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Results 21 - 40 of 195.


Physics / Materials Science - Medicine / Pharmacology - 30.05.2018
Hollywood in the Würenlingen woods
Hollywood in the Würenlingen woods
With the X-ray laser SwissFEL, researchers at PSI want to produce movies of biomolecules in action. This can reveal how our eyes function or how new drugs work. Luc Patthey stands next to a complicated arrangement of optical lenses, measuring instruments, countless cables, and a thin steel pipe. We're in Hollywood here.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Physics / Materials Science - 28.05.2018
Deciphering the language of cells using observation chambers
Deciphering the language of cells using observation chambers
EPFL researchers have developed an innovative label-free method for studying the behavior of single cells continuously and in real time. By placing a cell in a small chamber containing nanosensors and observing it over many hours, it is possible to identify the cell's unique personality and understand how it communicates.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Physics / Materials Science - 28.05.2018
Imaging the inside of injection needles with neutrons
Imaging the inside of injection needles with neutrons
PSI researchers help to understand why in pre-filled syringes, liquid medication can enter the needle inadvertently Researchers from the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, the University of Basel and the company F. Hoffmann-La Roche have found out why proper storage is crucial for syringes which are pre-filled with a liquid medication.

Sport Sciences - Physics / Materials Science - 28.05.2018
So that Ronaldo and Co. can «conjure»
So that Ronaldo and Co. can «conjure»
The official ball for the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia has received Empa's «OK» after numerous tests. Some goalkeepers may be critical of its flight characteristics, but the reason for their criticism may lie somewhere else - the rather unconventional appearance of the new ball. Football lives on emotions.

Chemistry - Microtechnics / Electroengineering - 25.05.2018
An elastic fiber set to revolutionize smart clothes
EPFL scientists have found a fast and simple way to make super-elastic, multi-material, high-performance fibers. Their fibers have already been used as sensors on robotic fingers and in clothing. This breakthrough method opens the door to new kinds of smart textiles and medical implants. It's a whole new way of thinking about sensors.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Business / Economics - 24.05.2018
EPFL analyzes the economic impact of three energy-transition scenario
A handful of EPFL laboratories teamed up to compare three energy-transition scenarios that vary in their use of fossil fuels and renewable energy and their energy efficiency. The study found that greater use of renewable energy, combined with more measures to enhance energy efficiency, would create more jobs in Switzerland and increase the country's energy independence without having any impact on the overall cost.

Physics / Materials Science - Life Sciences - 24.05.2018
New sensor can
New sensor can "feel" clothes
If you want to design a fluffy sweater or a sleek shirt, you have to predict the properties of textile surfaces.

Life Sciences - 23.05.2018
The path to success in fish sperm
In many animals, males pursue alternative tactics when competing for the fertilization of eggs. Some cichlid fishes from Lake Tanganyika breed in empty snail shells, which may select for extremely divergent mating tactics. A recent study at the Institute of Ecology and Evolution of the University of Bern shows that different male types within a species produce divergent sperm, specializing either in speed or longevity.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 23.05.2018
New anti-ALS drug receives Orphan Drug Designation
New anti-ALS drug receives Orphan Drug Designation
A new gene therapy for treating an inherited form of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis has been given an Orphan Drug Designation by the European Medicines Agency. The therapy is already in preclinical development at EPFL. "We are thrilled that the EMA endorses the soundness of our new therapy against this devastating rare disease," says Bernard Schneider, the EPFL scientist who leads the development of a new drug aimed at Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).

Astronomy - 21.05.2018
Cosmic ravioli and spaetzle
Cosmic ravioli and spaetzle
The small inner moons of Saturn look like giant ravioli and spaetzle. Their spectacular shape has been revealed by the Cassini spacecraft. For the first time, researchers of the University of Bern show how these moons were formed. The peculiar shapes are a natural outcome of merging collisions among similar-sized little moons as computer simulations demonstrate.

Life Sciences - Physics / Materials Science - 21.05.2018
Observing cellular activity, one molecule at a time
Using a new mode of atomic force microscopy, researchers at EPFL have found a way to see and measure protein assembly in real time and with unprecedented detail. Proteins and molecules assemble and disassemble naturally as part of many essential biological processes. It is very difficult to observe these mechanisms, which are often complex and take place at the nanometer scale, far smaller than the normal visible range.

Astronomy - Computer Science / Telecom - 18.05.2018
Focus on space debris
Focus on space debris
The Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB) has extended its observatory in Zimmerwald with two additional domed structures, and has renovated a dome. As a result, there are now six fully automated telescopes available for observation and specifically for detecting and cataloguing space debris.

Innovation / Technology - Environment / Sustainable Development - 17.05.2018
Nine at one blow
Nine at one blow
Atmospheric pollutants put a strain on the environment and harbor health hazards for humans. The Empa spin-off MIRO Analytical Technologies developed a technology to simultaneously analyze nine greenhouse gases and pollutants with only one device and at an unprecedented speed and precision. Air pollution is a problem that affects us all.

Computer Science / Telecom - Earth Sciences - 17.05.2018
CrowdWater: An App for Flood Research
CrowdWater: An App for Flood Research
The CrowdWater project, developed by doctoral candidates from the Department of Geography of the University of Zurich, is a citizen science project in the area of hydrology, the science of water. The project collects hydrological data on water levels, streamflows and soil moisture from all over the world.

Innovation / Technology - Environment / Sustainable Development - 17.05.2018
Nine in one swoop
Nine in one swoop
Atmospheric pollutants put a strain on the environment and harbor health hazards for humans. The Empa spin-off MIRO Analytical Technologies developed a technology to simultaneously analyze nine greenhouse gases and pollutants with only one device and at an unprecedented speed and precision. Air pollution is a problem that affects us all.

Chemistry - Physics / Materials Science - 16.05.2018
«Research should be fun»
«Research should be fun»
Research should set things in motion. This is the motto of Matthias Koebel, Head of Empa's Building Energy Materials and Components lab. The chemist has ambitious goals and successfully combines an inquisitive spirit with entrepreneurial flair. Matthias Koebel is a pragmatic. One who not only understands things but also wants to use them.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Physics / Materials Science - 14.05.2018
Opening: Advanced technology against cancer
Opening: Advanced technology against cancer
New treatment unit for proton therapy at PSI is inaugurated With millimetre precision, certain tumours can be irradiated at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI using protons - that is, positively charged elementary particles.

Life Sciences - 14.05.2018
Nouns Slow Down Our Speech
When we speak, we unconsciously pronounce some words more slowly than others, and sometimes we make brief pauses or throw in meaningless sounds like “uhm”. Such slow-down effects provide key evidence on how our brains process language. They point to difficulties when planning the utterance of a specific word.

Life Sciences - Careers / Employment - 14.05.2018
Spoilt for choice? How neuroscience can explain your attitude toward freedom of choice
Spoilt for choice? How neuroscience can explain your attitude toward freedom of choice
Being spoilt for choice can be a burden or a blessing: People value their freedom of choice differently. Whereas some people happily let others make decisions for them, others might rebel against restrictions of their freedom of choice. Scientists from the University of Bern have now been able to explain the individual attitude toward freedom of choice based on brain activations.