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Results 61 - 80 of 235.


Physics - Chemistry - 03.12.2021
Molecular device turns infrared into visible light
Molecular device turns infrared into visible light
Researchers at EPFL, China, Spain and the Netherlands have built a micro-device that uses vibrating molecules to transform invisible mid-infrared light into visible light. The breakthrough ushers in a new class of compact sensors for thermal imaging and chemical or biological analysis. Image: Artistic view of the nanoparticle-in-groove plasmonic cavities.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.12.2021
How food intake modifies the gut
How food intake modifies the gut
Researchers from the University of Geneva identified that the amount of food regulate the gut size and its capacity to absorb calories, thus shedding light on a fundamental mechanism at the very origin of obesity. With more than 10% of the world's population obese and 40% overweight, obesity constitutes one of the most crucial health challenges.

Life Sciences - Health - 02.12.2021
Tracking the neurons that make us social
Tracking the neurons that make us social
A team from the UNIGE has discovered that neurons linked to the reward system are responsible for motivating us to interact with our fellow human beings. Human beings, like most mammals, need social interactions to live and develop. The processes that drive them towards each other require decision making whose brain machinery is largely misunderstood.

Health - Chemistry - 02.12.2021
Uterine atlas can lead to better models of the womb, provide insights into diseases
Uterine atlas can lead to better models of the womb, provide insights into diseases
In the quest to study the womb and its role in reproductive health, researchers in the Turco lab and their collaborators have generated a cellular map of the human uterus and of endometrial organoids — lab-grown models of the womb's lining. The atlas, which is the most detailed of its kind, will help scientists to develop better models of the womb.

Environment - Life Sciences - 01.12.2021
Artificial intelligence helps speed up ecological surveys
Artificial intelligence helps speed up ecological surveys
Scientists at EPFL, the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research and Wageningen University & Research have developed a new deep-learning model for counting the number of seals in aerial photos that is considerably faster than doing it by hand. With this new method, valuable time and resources could be saved which can be used to further study and protect endangered species.

Life Sciences - 30.11.2021
Diversity in the brain: New genes create new cell types
Diversity in the brain: New genes create new cell types
Through duplication of genetic material cells can acquire new functions. This process may give rise to new cell types with unique properties. A research group at the University of Basel has now been able to demonstrate that gene duplication has generated new cell types in fish, thus supporting a classic theory of evolutionary biology.

Pharmacology - Health - 30.11.2021
Promising Drug Combination Treatment Against Parasitic Worm Infections
In a Phase III clinical trial, researchers at Swiss TPH have successfully gathered encouraging data to demonstrate higher efficacy of co-administration of ivermectin-albendazole in combating soil-transmitted helminthiasis. The findings were published yesterday in The Lancet Infectious Diseases Journal.

Physics - Electroengineering - 30.11.2021
Quantum physics across dimensions: Unidirectional Kondo Scattering
Quantum physics across dimensions: Unidirectional Kondo Scattering
An international team led by scientists, has unveiled a unique quantum-mechanical interaction between electrons and topological defects in layered materials that has only been observed in engineered atomic thin layers. The phenomenon can be reproduced by the native defects of lab grown large crystals, making future investigation of Kondo systems and quantum electronic devices more accessible.

Health - Environment - 30.11.2021
Personen mit niedrigem Einkommen stärker von Pandemie belastet
The COVCO-Basel study by the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) has been investigating the health-related and societal effects of the COVID-19 pandemic for over a year. New results from the study have shown that people coming from low-income households are more severely affected by the pandemic, and that rates of depression among this population group have risen.

Environment - 29.11.2021
Tracking down microplastics in Antarctica
Tracking down microplastics in Antarctica
Microplastics are everywhere, even in the most remote places. Where do these tiny pieces of plastic come from? Researchers from the University of Basel and the Alfred-Wegener Institute have shown that it takes precise analysis to answer this question. Microplastics are an environmental problem since organisms ingest these tiny particles and can be harmed by them.

Environment - Health - 29.11.2021
Ozone causes our skin to emit tiny airborne particles
Ozone causes our skin to emit tiny airborne particles
An international research team including scientists has found that whenever we encounter ozone, it reacts with lipids in our skin to create nanoparticles. Air pollution is responsible for seven million of premature deaths around the world every year, according to the World Health Organization. That's roughly the same number of people who die from smoking or malnutrition.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.11.2021
Wyss Center and Inselspital Bern announce clinical trial for long-term brain monitoring technology
Early clinical study will assess safety and feasibility of the Epios(TM) subscalp recording leads in epilepsy patients Geneva, Switzerland - Brain signal recording with the Wyss Center for Bio and Neuroengineering's subscalp Epios(TM) sensing electrodes (leads) is being carried out for the first time in patients at the University Hospital Bern, Inselspital.

Health - 29.11.2021
Cancer cells may promote metastases and resistance to therapy, depending on their state
Cancer cells may promote metastases and resistance to therapy, depending on their state
A type of cell transformation known as EMT enables cancer cells to break away from the tumor and form metastases elsewhere. However, this process does not always take place in full. Researchers at the University of Basel have now been able to show that tumor cells contribute differently to the formation of metastases and the development of therapy resistance, depending on whether they have undergone full or only partial transformation.

Health - Physics - 25.11.2021
Proton therapy: a success story that started 25 years ago
Proton therapy: a success story that started 25 years ago
On 25 November 1996, the Center for Proton Therapy at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI treated a cancer patient using the spot-scanning technique for the very first time - a world premiere. This technique developed at PSI scans and irradiates deep-seated tumours with a pencil-thin beam of charged particles, killing cancer cells with extreme precision while preserving the surrounding healthy tissue.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 25.11.2021
Tissue engineering using mechanobiology and robotic micromanipulation
Tissue engineering using mechanobiology and robotic micromanipulation
A team of EPFL engineers has discovered a strategy to shape living tissues like dough. Have you ever wondered how a sphere of cells, morula, gives rise to tissues and organs with mesmerizing shapes and architectures? The secret lies in the mechanics of embryonic tissues. They exhibit a viscous (fluid-like) and an elastic (solid-like) behavior depending on the forces acting on them.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 24.11.2021
Network records Europe's greenhouse gas emissions
Network records Europe’s greenhouse gas emissions
An article in the scientific journal "Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society" describes for the first time how the European ICOS network ("Integrated Carbon Observation System") helps to better understand the function of carbon sinks and to assess the effects of climate change on them. Half of the carbon emissions released to the atmosphere by fossil fuel use are re-captured by the ocean and land ecosystems.

Computer Science - Microtechnics - 23.11.2021
Robots build new hanging gardens
Robots build new hanging gardens
With the help of artificial intelligence and four collaborative robots, researchers at ETH Zurich are designing and fabricating a 22.5-metre-tall green architectural sculpture. Working with Müller Illien Landscape Architects, Timbatec and other partners from industry and research, researchers from the group led by ETH architecture professors Fabio Gramazio and Matthias Kohler are creating a green architectural sculpture for the Tech Cluster Zug.

Health - Psychology - 23.11.2021
Violence against nurses: a common problem in inpatient psychiatry
Violence against nurses: a common problem in inpatient psychiatry
Verbal and sexual assaults - nurses are at a high risk of being attacked by patients in inpatient psychiatry shows a study from the University of Basel. Researchers are now calling for new strategies for violence prevention. While violence by patients towards nurses is a familiar problem in inpatient psychiatry, previous studies have not succeeded in reflecting this phenomenon in all its complexity.

Health - 22.11.2021
Exposure to Harmless Coronaviruses Boosts SARS-CoV-2 Immunity
Exposure to Harmless Coronaviruses Boosts SARS-CoV-2 Immunity
Infections with the novel coronavirus and vaccination lead to strong antibody responses against SARS-CoV-2. Immune responses to other human coronaviruses, which mostly only cause harmless colds, also provide some protection against SARS-CoV-2. This cross-reactive immune response is an important piece of the puzzle of how to achieve comprehensive coronavirus immunity, researchers at the University of Zurich have shown.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.11.2021
A deep look into Huntington's brain aggregates
A deep look into Huntington's brain aggregates
A new study from EPFL reveals novel insights into the ultrastructure and biochemical composition of huntingtin aggregates, the mark of Huntington's disease, pointing to new avenues for treatment strategies. Huntington's disease is a progressively debilitating brain disease that causes uncontrolled movements, psychological problems, and loss of cognition.

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