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Results 61 - 80 of 264.


Astronomy / Space - 15.04.2024
How Pluto got its heart
How Pluto got its heart
The mystery of how Pluto got a giant heart-shaped feature on its surface has finally been solved by an international team of astrophysicists led by the University of Bern. The team is the first to successfully reproduce the unusual shape with numerical simulations, attributing it to a giant and slow oblique-angle impact.

Environment - 15.04.2024
Tropical forests can't recover naturally without fruit eating birds
Tropical forests can’t recover naturally without fruit eating birds
Natural forest regeneration is hailed as a cost-effective way to restore biodiversity and sequester carbon. However, the fragmentation of tropical forests has restricted the movement of large birds limiting their capacity to disperse seeds and restore healthy forests. New research from the Crowther Lab at ETH Zurich illustrates a critical barrier to natural regeneration of tropical forests.

Innovation - Research Management - 15.04.2024
Research has lost none of its innovative drive
Research has lost none of its innovative drive
A high-profile study made headlines in 2023 stating that the scientific and innovation system is producing less and less completely new knowledge. Researchers at the University of Basel are now refuting this claim, at least for patents: It is based on a measurement error. The discovery of mRNA in the 1960s was groundbreaking.

Chemistry - Environment - 12.04.2024
Will plastics soon be easier to degrade?
Will plastics soon be easier to degrade?
A research team has developed a new type of polymer, the main component of plastics, which is more easily degradable than conventional materials. Mechanical treatment such as grinding, combined with the use of an alkaline solution, is all that's needed to facilitate chemical recycling and reduce environmental impact .

Health - Life Sciences - 11.04.2024
A new tool for tracing the family trees of cells
A new tool for tracing the family trees of cells
Researchers have developed GEMLI, a pioneering tool that could democratize and vastly improve how we study the journey of cells from their embryonic state through to specialized roles in the body, as well as their changes in cancer and other diseases. In the intricate dance of life, where cells multiply and diversify to form the different parts of organisms, understanding each cell's origin can be crucial.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.04.2024
The genesis of our cellular skeleton, image by image
The genesis of our cellular skeleton, image by image
Scientists have reconstructed for the first time a film of the assembly of the human centriole, one of the essential structures that constitute our cells. Cells contain various specialised structures - such as the nucleus, mitochondria or peroxisomes - known as "organelles''. Tracing their genesis and determining their structure is fundamental to understanding cell function and the pathologies linked to their dysfunction.

Environment - Architecture - 10.04.2024
What can cities do to promote acceptance of densification?
What can cities do to promote acceptance of densification?
Swiss cities are more likely to accept densification when densification projects provide affordable housing and green spaces compared to densification that is implemented through reduced regulations for housing construction. By prioritizing a socio-ecological densification, extensive planning procedures and delays might be minimized.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 09.04.2024
Tiny plastic particles are found everywhere
Tiny plastic particles are found everywhere
Microplastic particles can be found in the most remote ocean regions on earth. In Antarctica, pollution levels are even higher than previously assumed. This is one finding of a recent study involving researchers from the University of Basel. It's not the first study on microplastics in Antarctica that researchers from the University of Basel and the Alfred-Wegener Institute (AWI) have conducted.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 08.04.2024
Protecting art and passwords with biochemistry
Protecting art and passwords with biochemistry
A new molecular test method helps to prove the authenticity of works of art. The new method could also help to make passwords secure against quantum computers. Security experts fear Q-Day, the day when quantum computers become so powerful that they can crack today's passwords. Some experts estimate that this day will come within the next ten years.

Sport - 08.04.2024
A friendly pat on the back can improve performance in basketball
A friendly pat on the back can improve performance in basketball
A free throw in basketball will have every eye glued to one person. It's an intensely stressful situation. A research team led by the University of Basel studied whether a friendly tap on the shoulder increases the odds of making a shot. In difficult situations, physical touch like a hug or a pat on the back can reduce stress.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 08.04.2024
Global warming is sinking meteorites
Global warming is sinking meteorites
More than 300,000 meteorites lie on the Antarctic ice. They contain an unprecedented wealth of information about our solar system. With every tenth of a degree of global warming, thousands of meteorites sink. Researchers from WSL and ETH recommend that their collection be promoted. The Antarctic holds a valuable treasure of around 300,000 meteorites lying on the surface of the ice.

Astronomy / Space - 08.04.2024
Largest 3D map of the universe ever made
Largest 3D map of the universe ever made
The first results from the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, or DESI, project, with significant contributions from EPFL astrophysicists, has mapped galaxies and quasars with unprecedented detail measuring how fast the universe expanded over 11 billion years. The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument project, an international collaboration of more than 900 researchers from over 70 institutions around the world including EPFL, has released its first results - a map of galaxies and quasars with unprecedented detail, creating the largest 3D map of the universe ever made.

Astronomy / Space - Earth Sciences - 05.04.2024
CHEOPS detects a ''rainbow'' on an exoplanet
CHEOPS detects a ’’rainbow’’ on an exoplanet
New observations from the space telescope point to the existence of a 'glory' in the atmosphere of WASP-76b, a luminous phenomenon like a rainbow. The CHEOPS space telescope, whose scientific operations centre is based at the University of Geneva , is providing new information on the mysterious exoplanet WASP-76b.

Environment - 05.04.2024
Transformative potential of decentralization
Transformative potential of decentralization
Researchers from EPFL and HES-SO Valais Wallis have published a study outlining a path to a more sustainable energy future for Switzerland. The study emphasizes the importance of local energy solutions, and the role of decentralized systems for community empowerment. A pivotal finding of the study, published in Energies , is the integration of decentralized photovoltaic (PV) systems into the Swiss energy grid; this could reduce annual system costs by 10% and elevate self-consumption rates to 68%.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.04.2024
Cystic fibrosis: why infections persist despite therapy
A team from the University of Geneva discovered that treatment for cystic fibrosis does not eliminate the docking stations of bacteria responsible for respiratory infections. Cystic fibrosis is a genetic and hereditary disease affecting specific cells - epithelial cells - lining certain organs, including the respiratory epithelium in our lungs (inset).

Materials Science - Innovation - 04.04.2024
Airy cellulose from a 3D printer
Airy cellulose from a 3D printer
Ultra-light, thermally insulating and biodegradable: Cellulose-based aerogels are versatile. researchers have succeeded in 3D printing the natural material into complex shapes that could one day serve as precision insulation in microelectronics or as personalized medical implants. At first glance, biodegradable materials, inks for 3D printing and aerogels don't seem to have much in common.

Environment - 04.04.2024
Impacts of invasive species transcend ecosystem boundaries
Impacts of invasive species transcend ecosystem boundaries
Invasive species influence biodiversity across larger spatial extents than previously thought. In a recently published study, researchers from Eawag and the University of Zurich show that the impacts of invasive species extend far beyond the ecosystems they invade and that three mechanisms are primarily responsible for this.

Health - Law - 04.04.2024
Liberalization of medical marijuana and mental health in the USA
Liberalization of medical marijuana and mental health in the USA
The approval of marijuana for medical use has had little effect on the mental health of the general population in the US. But legalization for therapeutic purposes does benefit those for whom it is intended. This is the conclusion of a study by researchers at the University of Basel. In the US, access to marijuana has been facilitated in most states since the mid-1990s - whether through medical clearance or through decriminalization of recreational use.

Physics - Environment - 04.04.2024
Nanodevices can produce energy from evaporating tap or seawater
Nanodevices can produce energy from evaporating tap or seawater
Researchers have discovered that nanoscale devices harnessing the hydroelectric effect can harvest electricity from the evaporation of fluids with higher ion concentrations than purified water, revealing a vast untapped energy potential. Evaporation is a natural process so ubiquitous that most of us take it for granted.

Pharmacology - Health - 03.04.2024
New Discovery Unravels Malaria Invasion Mechanism
New Discovery Unravels Malaria Invasion Mechanism
A recent breakthrough sheds light on how the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, invades human red blood cells. The study, led by the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) and Griffith University's Institute for Glycomics, reveals the role of a sugar called sialic acid in this invasion process.