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Results 81 - 100 of 324.


Life Sciences - Health - 23.03.2021
Study suggests a promising future for soft bioelectronic interfaces in clinical settings
Study suggests a promising future for soft bioelectronic interfaces in clinical settings
Results demonstrate MRI compatibility, good surgical handling and reliable recording in bioelectronic interfaces that conform to the nervous system Geneva, Switzerland - A new study published in Advanced Science by researchers from the Laboratory of Soft BioElectronics Interfaces (LSBI) at EPFL, led by Prof. Stéphanie P. Lacour , has demonstrated MRI compatibility in their soft electrode arrays - a crucial step in translation to the clinic.

Physics - 23.03.2021
New Results Challenge Leading Theory in Physics
New Results Challenge Leading Theory in Physics
Researchers at CERN have just released new intriguing results. According to the international research collaboration that runs the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment, the latest measurements strengthen hints for a deviation with respect to the theoretical expectations. If confirmed, the findings point towards physics beyond the Standard Model such as a new fundamental force.

Health - Social Sciences - 23.03.2021
Building resilience to COVID-19 and future pandemics
Building resilience to COVID-19 and future pandemics
An international team of scientists has drawn up a report on the resilience capacity needed by our societies to prevent, react to and recover from the COVID-19 crisis. The authors propose a path forward to shape resilient, inclusive, and sustainable societies. The COVID-19 pandemic triggered a global systemic crisis.

Computer Science - Physics - 23.03.2021
New high-performance computing hub aims to harness the sun's energy
New high-performance computing hub aims to harness the sun's energy
EPFL will soon be home to a European hub for high-performance computing focused on fusion power - a potential source of clean, risk-free energy. As part of this effort, EPFL's Swiss Plasma Center will lead a campus-wide, cross-disciplinary research team. EUROfusion - or the European Consortium for the Development of Fusion Energy, which consists of organizations from 28 European countries - has just selected EPFL as the site for its Advanced Computing Hub.

Materials Science - 23.03.2021
Knitting roads
Knitting roads
Empa scientists are investigating how roads could be reinforced with simple means and recycled easily after use. Their tools are a robot and a few meters of string. A robotic arm lays out a string in a mandala-like pattern on a bed of gravel. What appears to be a contemporary art performance is basic research that explores new ways in road construction.

Environment - 22.03.2021
A new dye shakes up solar cells
A new dye shakes up solar cells
Scientists have developed a new dye for solar cells that enables high power-conversion efficiency while being simple and cheap to make. The dye also works exceptionally well under low-light conditions, which is key for selfand low-powered devices. In 1991, scientists Brian O'Regan and Michael Grätzel at EPFL published a seminal paper describing a new type of solar cell: the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), also known as "Grätzel cell".

Health - Life Sciences - 22.03.2021
Lung cancer resistance: the key is glucose
Lung cancer resistance: the key is glucose
Lung tumors are home to immune cells that affect their growth and resistance to treatment. Looking at neutrophils, scientists led by EPFL have discovered that the key might lie in the cells' ability to metabolize glucose, opening an entirely new target for improving radiotherapy. Cancers are not only made of tumor cells.

Health - 19.03.2021
Novel Diagnostics to Improve Migrant and Refugee Health
Novel Diagnostics to Improve Migrant and Refugee Health
Swiss TPH is launching a new project on the development of an integrated infectious disease diagnosis and surveillance system (NIIDS) to improve migrant and refugee health. NIIDS will assess healthcare needs of migrants and refugees, as well as set up a platform to support the diagnosis and management of clinically relevant infectious diseases in these vulnerable populations.

Health - Chemistry - 19.03.2021
Particulates are more dangerous than previously thought
Particulates are more dangerous than previously thought
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have for the first time observed photochemical processes inside the smallest particles in the air. In doing so, they discovered that additional oxygen radicals that can be harmful to human health are formed in these aerosols under everyday conditions. They report on their results today .

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 19.03.2021
Revealing the way a critical enzyme works in the cell
Revealing the way a critical enzyme works in the cell
Combining structural biology, molecular simulations, mutagenesis, and in vivo assays, EPFL scientists have made the first extensive study of the mode of action of the enzyme acyl thioesterase, which regulates deacylation, one of the most critical functions of the cell. S'acylation is the process of chemically linking a lipid to protein via a thioester bond.

Life Sciences - 18.03.2021
Scaled, armoured or naked: how does the skin of fish evolve?
Scaled, armoured or naked: how does the skin of fish evolve?
Researchers at the UNIGE have traced the family tree of ray-finned fish in order to reconstruct the evolution of the protective structures of their skin. Usually scaled, the skin of fish can also be naked or made up of bony plates that form an armour, sometimes even covered with teeth. But how has this skin evolved over the ages? To answer this question, researchers at the University of Geneva , Switzerland, have reconstructed the evolution of the protective skin structures in fish, going back to the common ancestor of ray-finned fish, more than 420 million years ago.

Physics - Electroengineering - 18.03.2021
Nano-mapping phase transitions in electronic materials
Nano-mapping phase transitions in electronic materials
Scientists at EPFL and the University of Geneva have combined two powerful, cutting-edge techniques to uncover the physics behind an exotic phase transition that turns a metal into an insulator. The materials they looked at are rare-earth nickelates, which are of great interest for innovating new approaches in electronics.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 18.03.2021
The invisible keyhole
The invisible keyhole
Hard times for burglars and safecrackers: Empa researchers have developed an invisible "keyhole" made of printed, transparent electronics. Only authorized persons know where to enter the access code. At first glance, Empa researcher Evgeniia Gilshtein's idea seems inconspicuous - or more precisely, invisible.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.03.2021
Artificial Light Affects Plant Pollination Even During the Daytime
Artificial Light Affects Plant Pollination Even During the Daytime
Streetlights alter the number of flower visits by insects not just at night, but also during the daytime. Artificial light at night thus indirectly affects the entire plant-pollinator community, with unknown consequences for functioning of the ecosystem, as researchers from the University of Zurich and Agroscope have proven for the first time.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 17.03.2021
Losing rivers
Losing rivers
ETH Zurich and University of California Santa Barbara researchers reveal the extent to which rivers across the USA are losing flow to aquifers. Water is an ephemeral thing. It can emerge from an isolated spring, as if by magic, giving birth to a babbling brook. It can also course through a mighty river, seeping into the soil until all that remains downstream is a dry streambed, the nearby trees offering the only hint as to where the water has disappeared.

Computer Science - 16.03.2021
Virtual reality at your fingertips
Virtual reality at your fingertips
When a person taps with their fingers, each finger generates a different vibration profile propagating to the wrist through bones. ETH Zurich researchers have now leveraged this discovery in the development of a dual-sensor wristband that brings intuitive free-hand interaction to virtual productivity spaces.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 16.03.2021
Consumption of Added Sugar Doubles Fat Production
Consumption of Added Sugar Doubles Fat Production
Too much sugar is unhealthy - that we know, but it-s not just down to the many calories. Even moderate amounts of added fructose and sucrose double the body's own fat production in the liver, researchers from the University of Zurich have shown. In the long term, this contributes to the development of diabetes or a fatty liver.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.03.2021
Retinal implants can give artificial vision to the blind
Retinal implants can give artificial vision to the blind
A team of EPFL engineers has developed technology that could partially restore vision in blind people. Being able to make blind people see again sounds like the stuff of miracles or even science fiction. And it has always been one of the biggest challenges for scientists. Diego Ghezzi, who holds the Medtronic Chair in Neuroengineering (LNE) at EPFL's School of Engineering, has made this issue a research focus.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 15.03.2021
Voltage from wood
Voltage from wood
Researchers at ETH Zurich and Empa have chemically modified wood and made it more compressible, turning it into a mini-generator. When compressed, it generates an electrical voltage. Such wood could serve as a biosensor or as a building material that harvests energy. As Ingo Burgert and his team at ETH Zurich and Empa have proven time and again: wood is so much more than just a building material.

Materials Science - Environment - 15.03.2021
Voltage from the parquet
Voltage from the parquet
Researchers at Empa and ETH Zurich have made wood compressible and turned it into a micro-generator. When it is loaded, an electrical voltage is generated. In this way, the wood can serve as a bio-sensor - or generate usable energy. The latest highlight: To ensure that the process does not require aggressive chemicals, naturally occurring wood-degrading fungi take over the task of modifying the wood.