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Results 81 - 100 of 248.


Life Sciences - Health - 19.12.2023
More parallel 'traffic' observed in human brains than in animals
More parallel 'traffic' observed in human brains than in animals
In a study comparing human brain communication networks with those of macaques and mice, researchers found that only the human brains transmitted information via multiple parallel pathways, yielding new insights into mammalian evolution. When describing brain communication networks, EPFL senior postdoctoral researcher Alessandra Griffa likes to use travel metaphors.

Life Sciences - 19.12.2023
Can we decode the language of our primate cousins?
Can we decode the language of our primate cousins?
A team from the University of Geneva shows that the human brain is capable of identifying the vocalisations of certain primate species, if they are close to us and if the frequencies used are also close to our own. Are we able to differentiate between the vocal emissions of certain primates? A team from the University of Geneva asked volunteers to categorise the vocalisations of three species of great apes ( Hominidae ) and humans.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.12.2023
New possibilities for botox
New possibilities for botox
PSI researchers have discovered a surprising trick that could expand the possibilities for medical use of botulinun toxin A1, better known under the name Botox, as an active agent. They have developed antibody-like proteins that speed up the enzyme's effect on the transmission of nerve signals. This suggests that Botox might, for example, be able to relief pain more quickly than before.

Pharmacology - Health - 18.12.2023
Antibiotic consumption rose massively in the first year of the pandemic
Antibiotic consumption rose massively in the first year of the pandemic
Antibiotics are useless against viruses, including the coronavirus. Nevertheless, doctors in Switzerland prescribed antibacterial drugs about twice as often in the first year of the pandemic as before, report researchers from the University of Basel. A risky practice, warns the research team . It was a time of great uncertainty: when the first coronavirus wave rolled across Switzerland in spring 2020, there were neither diagnostic tests nor a vaccine nor effective medication.

Physics - Innovation - 18.12.2023
A micro-ring resonator with big potential
A micro-ring resonator with big potential
Researchers have developed a hybrid device that significantly improves existing, ubiquitous laser technology. The team at EPFL's Photonic Systems Laboratory (PHOSL) has developed a chip-scale laser source that enhances the performance of semiconductor lasers while enabling the generation of shorter wavelengths.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.12.2023
Combating Over-Prescription of Antibiotics in Children: A Swiss-Tanzanian Digital Health Innovation with Promising Results
Combating Over-Prescription of Antibiotics in Children: A Swiss-Tanzanian Digital Health Innovation with Promising Results
A large-scale study by the DYNAMIC project has produced promising results: the use of a new digital clinical decision-making tool has led to a twoto three-fold reduction in the prescription of antibiotics. These results, just published in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Medicine, marks an important step towards curbing bacterial antimicrobial resistance.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 15.12.2023
Scientists measure the distance to stars by their music
Scientists measure the distance to stars by their music
A team of astronomers has used asteroseismology, or the study of stellar oscillations, to accurately measure the distance of stars from the Earth. Their research examined thousands of stars and checked the measurements taken during the Gaia mission to study the near Universe. For most of us, the countless bright spots in the nighttime sky all seem to be stars.

Life Sciences - Microtechnics - 14.12.2023
Cognitive strategies to augment the body with an extra robotic arm
Cognitive strategies to augment the body with an extra robotic arm
Scientists show that breathing may be used to control a wearable extra robotic arm in healthy individuals, without hindering control of other parts of the body. Neuroengineer Silvestro Micera develops advanced technological solutions to help people regain sensory and motor functions that have been lost due to traumatic events or neurological disorders.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.12.2023
Physical and Social Activities Promote Healthy Brain Aging
Neuropsychology Physical and social activities in old age have a protective effect on the entorhinal cortex, researchers at UZH have shown. This important area of the brain, which plays a central role in memory, is impaired in patients with Alzheimer's disease, even in the early stages. Physical exercise is associated with a variety of positive health aspects.

Environment - Astronomy / Space - 14.12.2023
Accurate snow measurement thanks to AI and satellites
Accurate snow measurement thanks to AI and satellites
Snow measurement has never been so fast and accurate: researchers have developed an artificial intelligence capable of determining snow depth across Switzerland using satellite images. How much snow is there up in the mountains, and where exactly is it? The answer is of just as much interest to the winter tourism industry and operators of hydropower plants as it is to winter sport enthusiasts looking to gauge the risk of avalanches.

Innovation - 12.12.2023
Artificial intelligence for safer bike helmets and better shoe soles
Artificial intelligence for safer bike helmets and better shoe soles
Researchers have trained an artificial intelligence to design the structure of so-called metamaterials with desired mechanical properties for a wide range of applications. Bike helmets that absorb the energy of an impact, running shoes that give you an extra boost with every step, or implants that behave just like natural bone.

Health - 12.12.2023
Limited Trust in Health Systems Can Hinder Universal Health Coverage
Limited Trust in Health Systems Can Hinder Universal Health Coverage
Studies published in the Lancet Global Health finds that only one-quarter of people thinks their health system works well. The People's Voice Survey analysed people's views and trust in the system in 15 countries, adding a missing component to how one evaluates health system performance. Swiss TPH contributed to these studies.

Health - History / Archeology - 12.12.2023
Plague from Egypt: topos or reality?
Plague from Egypt: topos or reality?
Many reports from antiquity about outbreaks of plague mention Egypt as the source of pestilences that reached the Mediterranean. But was this really the case? Researchers from the University of Basel are conducting a critical analysis of the ancient written and documentary evidence combined with archaeogenetic findings to add some context to the traditional view.

Health - 12.12.2023
Limited Trust in Health Systems Hinders Universal Health Coverage
Limited Trust in Health Systems Hinders Universal Health Coverage
A series of papers in the Lancet Global Health published yesterday finds that only one-quarter of people thinks their health system works well. The People's Voice Survey analysed people's views and trust in the system in 15 countries, adding a missing component to how one evaluates health system performance.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2023
AI unlocks new insights in neurodegenerative disease research
Researchers develop an AI-driven, label-free method for studying protein aggregates, offering new perspectives in neurodegenerative disease research. Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's, are a growing challenge in healthcare, affecting millions globally. They are characterized by a progressive decline in neural function and manifest in a range of debilitating symptoms.

Physics - Computer Science - 08.12.2023
Training algorithm breaks barriers to deep physical neural networks
Training algorithm breaks barriers to deep physical neural networks
Researchers have developed an algorithm to train an analog neural network just as accurately as a digital one, enabling the development of more efficient alternatives to power-hungry deep learning hardware. With their ability to process vast amounts of data through algorithmic 'learning' rather than traditional programming, it often seems like the potential of deep neural networks like Chat-GPT is limitless.

Physics - Life Sciences - 07.12.2023
Riding sound waves in the brain
Researchers have shown for the first time that microvehicles can be steered through blood vessels in the brains of mice using ultrasound. They hope that this will eventually lead to treatments capable of delivering drugs with pinpoint precision. Brain tumours, brain haemorrhages and neurological and psychological conditions are often hard to treat with medication.

Life Sciences - 06.12.2023
Enhanced AI tracks neurons in moving animals
EPFL and Harvard scientists have developed a pioneering new method that uses deep learning and a new technique called 'targeted augmentation' to track neurons in moving and deforming animals. Recent advances allow imaging of neurons inside freely moving animals. However, to decode circuit activity, these imaged neurons must be computationally identified and tracked.

Chemistry - Agronomy / Food Science - 05.12.2023
How to identify vintage wines by their chemical signature
How to identify vintage wines by their chemical signature
A team of researchers has revealed how to find the exact origin of a wine based solely on its chemical components. Does every wine carry its own chemical signature and, if so, can this be used to identify its origin? Many specialists have tried to solve this mystery, without fully succeeding.

Health - 05.12.2023
Replacing bone saws with smart lasers
Replacing bone saws with smart lasers
Using lasers rather than scalpels and saws has many benefits in surgery. Yet they are only used in isolated cases. But that could be about to change: laser systems are getting smarter and better all the time, as a research team from the University of Basel demonstrates. Even back in 1957, when Gordon Gould coined the term "laser" (short for " L ight A mplification by S timulated E mission of R adiation"), he was already imagining the possibilities for its use in medicine.