Category


Years
2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008


Results 81 - 100 of 209.


Health - 15.02.2019
Introduction of flat-rate payments accompanied by an increase in readmission rates
Introduction of flat-rate payments accompanied by an increase in readmission rates
Seven years after the introduction of flat-rate payments at Swiss hospitals, a major study has revealed a slight increase in readmission rates. Researchers from the University of Basel and the Cantonal Hospital of Aarau reported the findings in the journal JAMA Network Open. In January 2012, a flat-rate payment structure for inpatient hospital services was introduced across Switzerland in the form of the Swiss Diagnosis Related Groups (SwissDRG).

Social Sciences - Psychology - 15.02.2019
Live better with attainable goals
Live better with attainable goals
Those who set realistic goals can hope for a higher level of well-being. The key for later satisfaction is whether the life goals are seen as attainable and what they mean to the person, as psychologists from the University of Basel report in a study with over 970 participants. Wealth, community, health, meaningful work: life goals express a person's character, as they determine behavior and the compass by which people are guided.

Electroengineering - Physics - 15.02.2019
A transformer to drive the transition from AC to DC
A transformer to drive the transition from AC to DC
EPFL researchers have developed a compact and efficient medium-frequency transformer. Their device is poised to enhance the flexibility and efficiency of tomorrow's smart grids and DC power distribution networks. An EPFL-made prototype has been thoroughly tested and presented in several tutorials designed for experts from the academic and industrial worlds.

Environment - 14.02.2019
Media and industry not always interested in the same topics
Media and industry not always interested in the same topics
Hardly a day went by in the summer of 2018 without a report on the continuing water scarcity at the time in Switzerland. Again and again, newspapers, radio and television were coming up with questions like: "How much water do nature, agriculture and people need?", "How can we find ways to save water?" and "Which regions have the least water reserves?" On the other hand, Swiss municipal governments, cantons, engineering firms, NGOs and public sector agencies appear to be less concerned with the relationship between water scarcity and water-saving measures.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.02.2019
Diabetes: human cells can also change jobs
Diabetes: human cells can also change jobs
UNIGE researchers demonstrate the ease of some human pancreatic cells to make insulin. In diabetes, this type of cell conversion could compensate for the loss or dysfunction of cells that naturally produce this hormone. A world first. Biology textbooks teach us that adult cell types remain fixed in the identity they have acquired upon differentiation.

Environment - Life Sciences - 13.02.2019
Fate of Meerkats Tied to Seasonal Climate Effects
Fate of Meerkats Tied to Seasonal Climate Effects
Does a drier and hotter climate present a threat to the meerkats in the Kalahari Desert? Researchers from UZH and Cambridge show that climate change is likely to impact meerkats, and seasonal rainfall and temperature will be the key factors. The effects of climate change are especially obvious in arid environments where resources are scarce and subject to seasonal availability.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 12.02.2019
"Better to dry a rocky planet before use"
Earth's solid surface and clement climate may be in part due to a massive star in the birth environment of the Sun. Without its radioactive elements injected into the early solar system, our home planet could be a hostile ocean world covered in global ice sheets. This is demonstrated by computer simulations in which the National Centre of Competence in Research PlanetS, based at the University of Bern, was involved.

Physics - Materials Science - 12.02.2019
Next-generation optics in just two minutes of cooking time
Next-generation optics in just two minutes of cooking time
One of the key building blocks of flexible photonic circuits and ultra-thin optics are metasurfaces. And EPFL engineers have now discovered a simple way of making these surfaces in just a few minutes - without needing a clean room - using a method already employed in manufacturing. Their findings have just been published.

Physics - Life Sciences - 12.02.2019
The physical forces of cells in action
The physical forces of cells in action
Swiss scientists have developed probes designed to reveal the physical forces inside living cells. A world first. The detection of physical forces is one of the most complex challenges facing science. Although Newton's apple has long solved the problem of gravity, imaging the physical forces that act in living cells remains one of the main mysteries of current biology.

Chemistry - 12.02.2019
New device simplifies measurement of fluoride contamination in water
New device simplifies measurement of fluoride contamination in water
Seeking to address fluoride contamination in drinking water, chemical engineers at EPFL have developed a portable and user-friendly device that can measure fluoride concentration accurately and reliably. Adding fluoride to water has been common practice in a number of countries, including the US, Australia, Brazil, Malaysia, India and Vietnam.

Innovation / Technology - Life Sciences - 11.02.2019
Human enhancement: is it good for society?
Human enhancement: is it good for society?
A team of international scientists has been investigating new technologies that enhance the physical and cognitive skills of human beings, as well as their development and distribution in society. The need to put an appropriate framework in place is becoming increasingly urgent. Human enhancement technologies are opening up tremendous new possibilities.

Environment - Life Sciences - 11.02.2019
The search for Selenium: Traces in the high Alps
The search for Selenium: Traces in the high Alps
Up to a billion people around the world are deficient in selenium and do not get sufficient amounts in their diets. This is detrimental to health, as selenium plays an important role in the immune system and is involved in the formation of countless proteins in the body. Animal products and, most of all, grains contain a lot of selenium.

Physics - 08.02.2019
Cryo-force spectroscopy reveals the mechanical properties of DNA components
Cryo-force spectroscopy reveals the mechanical properties of DNA components
Physicists from the University of Basel have developed a new method to examine the elasticity and binding properties of DNA molecules on a surface at extremely low temperatures. With a combination of cryo-force spectroscopy and computer simulations, they were able to show that DNA molecules behave like a chain of small coil springs.

Health - Pharmacology - 08.02.2019
Drug-resistant tuberculosis: high mortality rate due to inaccurate tests
Drug-resistant tuberculosis: high mortality rate due to inaccurate tests
Inaccurate tests carried out on tuberculosis patients in developing countries often fail to reliably detect resistance to drugs, leading to incorrect treatment and a higher mortality rate. These are the results of study by an international group of researchers led by a team at the University of Bern published today.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 08.02.2019
Gummy-like robots could help prevent disease
Gummy-like robots could help prevent disease
EPFL scientists have developed microscopic, hydrogel-based muscles that can manipulate and mechanically stimulate biological tissue. These soft, biocompatible robots could be used for targeted therapy and to help diagnose and prevent disease. Human tissues experience a variety of mechanical stimuli that can affect their ability to carry out their physiological functions, such as protecting organs from injury.

Materials Science - Innovation / Technology - 07.02.2019
How safe is graphene?
How safe is graphene?
Graphene is considered one of the most interesting and versatile materials of our time. The application possibilities inspire both research and industry. But are products containing graphene also safe for humans and the environment? A comprehensive review, developed as part of the European graphene flagship project with the participation of Empa researchers, investigated this question.

Health - Social Sciences - 07.02.2019
Dying in Switzerland - a review of current developments
All of us die - but the question is how? Today we have a greater say in the way our lives end than ever before. Nevertheless, most people do not die where they would like to. The book "Das Lebensende in der Schweiz" (End of life in Switzerland) reflects on what is currently known about dying in Switzerland.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.02.2019
Escort service: The role of immune cells in the formation of metastases
Tumor cells use a certain type of immune cells, the so-called neutrophils, to enhance their ability to form metastases. Scientists have deciphered the mechanisms of this collaboration and found strategies for blocking them. This is reported by researchers from the University of Basel and the University Hospital of Basel in the scientific journal "Nature".

Life Sciences - 06.02.2019
Morals versus Money: How We Make Social Decisions
Our actions are guided by moral values. However, monetary incentives can get in the way of our good intentions. Neuroeconomists at the University of Zurich have now investigated in which area of the brain conflicts between moral and material motives are resolved. Their findings reveal that our actions are more social when these deliberations are inhibited.

Life Sciences - 05.02.2019
Fine-tuning gene regulation by CG dinucleotides
Fine-tuning gene regulation by CG dinucleotides
Transcription of our genes mostly begins in regions of the genome called CpG islands. These are rich in the dinucleotide CpG (thus the name), critical for gene activity and devoid of DNA methylation. Despite the relevance of CpG islands, it is unclear if the CpG dinucleotide itself contributes to their activity.