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Results 81 - 100 of 277.


Life Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 14.10.2019
"Virtual microscopes" freely accessible, thanks to USI’s contribution
Molecular dynamics simulations represent an increasingly important cornerstone of modern scientific research, thanks to their unparalleled ability to meticulously describe fundamental aspects of complex systems. It is not a coincidence that nowadays molecular simulations are considered a "virtual microscope" from which admire and examine biological processes, as well as confirm through "computational assays" innovative hypotheses which provide the basis for designing new experiments.

Life Sciences - Microtechnics - 11.10.2019
DeepFly3D: the deep-learning way to design fly-like robots
DeepFly3D: the deep-learning way to design fly-like robots
EPFL scientists have developed a deep-learning based motion-capture software that uses multiple camera views to model the movements of a fly in three dimensions. The ultimate aim is to use this knowledge to design fly-like robots. "Just think about what a fly can do," says Professor Pavan Ramdya, whose lab at EPFL's Brain Mind Institute , with the lab of Professor Pascal Fua at EPFL's Institute for Computer Science, led the study.

Physics - Innovation - 11.10.2019
Controlling superconducting regions within an exotic metal
Controlling superconducting regions within an exotic metal
Researchers at EPFL have created a metallic microdevice in which they can define and tune patterns of superconductivity. Their discovery, which holds great promise for quantum technologies of the future, has just been published in Science. Superconductivity has fascinated scientists for many years since it offers the potential to revolutionize current technologies.

Environment - Life Sciences - 10.10.2019
Babies burdened by environmental estrogens in mothers' wombs
Babies burdened by environmental estrogens in mothers’ wombs
Early childhood life in the womb is particularly sensitive to the effects of environmental pollutants. A team from Empa and the University of Vienna has now for the first time been able to show how a pollutant from contaminated food - the environmental estrogen zearalenone - spreads in the womb and is metabolized into harmful metabolites.

Astronomy / Space Science - Event - 10.10.2019
This Nobel Prize makes EPFL's astrophysicists proud
This Nobel Prize makes EPFL's astrophysicists proud
In 2002, EPFL awarded the distinction of doctor honoris causa to Michel Mayor, an astronomer at the University of Geneva, for discovering the first exoplanet. This past Tuesday, Mayor, along with colleague Didier Quloz and the American scientist James Peebles, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics.

Earth Sciences - 09.10.2019
Was that the main quake?
So far it has not been possible to predict whether a strong quake will probably be followed by a stronger one or not. A new study by researchers from the Swiss Seismological Service at ETH Zurich gives rise to hopes of being able to make predictions in almost real time. Whereas most major earthquakes are not preceded by foreshocks, they are always followed by thousands of aftershocks, whose frequency and magnitude fade over time.

Transport - 09.10.2019
Geneva's commuters embrace multimodal transport
Geneva's commuters embrace multimodal transport
Researchers at EPFL have carried out an in-depth survey of commuter practices in Greater Geneva - the area covering Geneva Canton, the Nyon region and neighboring parts of France. Why do some people cycle instead of taking the bus' Why do others drive rather than traveling by train? Two factors - price and journey time - have long determined how commuters choose to get to work.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 09.10.2019
Liquifying a rocky exoplanet
Liquifying a rocky exoplanet
A hot, molten Earth would be around 5% larger than its solid counterpart. This is the result of a study led by researchers at the University of Bern. The difference between molten and solid rocky planets is important for the search of Earth-like worlds beyond our Solar System and the understanding of Earth itself.

Astronomy / Space Science - 08.10.2019
Nobel Prize in Physics awarded to Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz
Nobel Prize in Physics awarded to Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz
Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz were awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics for their discovery of the first exoplanet in 1995. On October 6, 1995, Michel Mayor, Professor at the Observatory of the Faculty of Science of the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, and the doctoral candidate Didier Queloz revolutionized the world of astrophysics when they announced the discovery of the first planet located outside our solar system.

Music - Materials Science - 08.10.2019
Romantic Replicas
Romantic Replicas
To play a piece of music as it was conceived by the composer is a trend. But where can the rare historical instruments be found? The solution would be exact copies of the coveted originals. A team of Empa researchers is analysing such replicas with the aim of reproducing historical trombones with their typical sound.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 08.10.2019
Modern Family Roles Improve Life Satisfaction for Parents
Increased equality has a positive effect on mothers and fathers. Thanks to greater freedom to strike an individual balance between caring for children and working in paid employment, mothers and fathers today are happier with their lives than parents were 20 or 30 years ago, a study by sociologists at the University of Zurich has shown.

Life Sciences - 08.10.2019
Complex odors made simple
Complex odors made simple
Animals are able to attach simple ratings to complex objects in their environment to guide behavior. For example, humans can easily tell whether they like a wine or not, which will influence their future choices in the wine store. Similarly, animals can tell whether a complex odor is good or bad in order to decide whether to approach or avoid it.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.10.2019
The cholera bacterium can steal up to 150 genes in one go
The cholera bacterium can steal up to 150 genes in one go
EPFL scientists have discovered that predatory bacteria like the cholera pathogen can steal up to 150 genes in one go from their neighbors. The study sheds light on one of the most fundamental mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer. In 2015, EPFL researchers led by Melanie Blokesch published a seminal paper in Science showing that the bacterium responsible for cholera, Vibrio cholerae , uses a spring-loaded spear to literally stab neighboring bacteria and steal their DNA.

Materials Science - Health - 08.10.2019
On Your Medicine's Secret Service
On Your Medicine’s Secret Service
Whether a wound heals well under a dressing cannot be seen from the outside. Empa researchers are now enabling a view through the bandage la James Bond. The refined application of terahertz radiation could promote the analysis of multi-layered tissues for medical purposes and be used for wound treatment or the diagnostics of blood vessel plaques.

Life Sciences - Environment - 08.10.2019
High-speed evolution observed in daphnia
High-speed evolution observed in daphnia
Daphnia, also known as water fleas, play an important role in the food web of lakes: they feed on phytoplankton and are eaten by predators such as fish. Their food resources show marked seasonal variation: in eutrophic waters, the summer is particularly challenging for daphnia, as the phytoplankton community is dominated by cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), which are of poor nutritional quality and often contain toxins.

Music - Materials Science - 08.10.2019
An Open Ear for Noise
An Open Ear for Noise
A rippling stream is Jean-Marc Wunderli's favourite sound. However, his everyday research has little to do with calming natural sounds. He deals with completely different ones: noise from aircraft turbines, train noise, busy roads, wind turbines and now even drones. All these emissions are part of the research activities of Empa's Acoustics / Noise Control Lab, which Wunderli is heading since last July.

Physics - Computer Science / Telecom - 08.10.2019
Smaller than a coin
Smaller than a coin
ETH researchers have developed a compact infrared spectrometer. It's small enough to fit on a computer chip but can still open up interesting possibilities - in space and in everyday life. Nowadays, a mobile phone can do almost anything: take photos or video, send messages, determine its present location, and of course transmit telephone conversations.

Materials Science - Physics - 07.10.2019
Unbreakable
Unbreakable
Can glass flow at room temperature and thus withstand hard impacts' A theory from the 1970s predicted exactly this. Empa researchers have now provided the proof. The results could form the basis for robust 3D printed glass microarchitectures. No one in the world has ever seen what we have measured," says Rajaprakash Ramachandramoorthy.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 07.10.2019
Slow Decay
Slow Decay
"Corrosion" comes from Latin "corrodere": to gnaw something to pieces. This refers to the gradual destruction of a substance due to the influence of other substances in the environment. Specialists at Empa take a close look at such processes and can find timely ways to prevent material failure due to corrosion - long before disasters such as those in Genoa occur.

Environment - Health - 07.10.2019
The impact of ambient air pollution on hospital admissions
Air pollution is the centre of debate on many fronts, from air protection measures involving road traffic, to technological innovations to reduce harmful emissions.