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Results 101 - 120 of 279.


Materials Science - Environment - 07.10.2019
The Wood Paradox
The Wood Paradox
It can be deformed as required and is three times stronger than natural wood: the wood material developed by Marion Frey, Tobias Keplinger and Ingo Burgert at Empa and ETH Zurich has the potential to become a high-tech material. In the process, the researchers remove precisely the part of the wood that gives it its stability in nature: lignin.

Materials Science - Health - 07.10.2019
The Screw That Dissolves
The Screw That Dissolves
Where bones fracture, surgeons often have to join the fragments with implants. Magnesium orthopaedic screws, which over time dissolve in the body, spare patients another operation after healing is completed and reduce the risk of infection. What happens inside the body during this process, though, is still largely unknown.

Transport - Environment - 03.10.2019
The right carbon tax to reduce the impact of transport in Switzerland
The right carbon tax to reduce the impact of transport in Switzerland
Using macroeconomic modeling, EPFL researchers have identified the most effective carbon tax for Switzerland to meet the Paris Agreement targets: a uniform levy on gasoline, diesel fuel and heating oil, rising steadily to 1.70 francs per liter by 2050.† The Swiss transport sector has become the country's leading CO2 emitter, accounting for 41% of total emissions.

Life Sciences - 02.10.2019
Genetic development is influenced by the host-parasite relationship - but not only that!
Genetic development is influenced by the host-parasite relationship - but not only that!
In textbooks on evolution, conceptional and mathematical models explain how a host-parasite relationship affects the genome of both organisms. This is known as coevolution. How this interaction really functions can, on the other hand, be proven in vivo for only a few genes. Studies of the whole genome of both species that also show the progression of this mutual influence over time have never been done before.

Computer Science / Telecom - 30.09.2019
Researchers invent low-cost alternative to Bitcoin
The cryptocurrency Bitcoin is limited by its astronomical electricity consumption and outsized carbon footprint. A nearly zero-energy alternative sounds too good to be true, but as School of Computer and Communication Sciences (IC) Professor Rachid Guerraoui explains, it all comes down to our understanding of what makes transactions secure.

Health - Computer Science / Telecom - 30.09.2019
Artificial intelligence improves biomedical imaging
Artificial intelligence improves biomedical imaging
ETH researchers use artificial intelligence to improve quality of images recorded by a relatively new biomedical imaging method. This paves the way towards more accurate diagnosis and cost-effective devices. Scientists at ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich have used machine learning methods to improve optoacoustic imaging.

Environment - 27.09.2019
From sink to source: turbulence in water releases hormones from sediment
From sink to source: turbulence in water releases hormones from sediment
Natural, human oestrogens, as well as synthetic substances such as the contraceptive pill, pesticides and industrial chemicals, are transported mainly via our wastewater into surface waters. These so-called hormonally active agents can upset the normal hormone balance of aquatic organisms such as fish, and affect their development, health and reproduction.

Computer Science / Telecom - 27.09.2019
Artificial skin could help rehabilitation and enhance virtual reality
Artificial skin could help rehabilitation and enhance virtual reality
EPFL scientists have developed a soft artificial skin that provides haptic feedback and - thanks to a sophisticated self-sensing mechanism - has the potential to instantaneously adapt to a wearer's movements. Applications for the new technology range from medical rehabilitation to virtual reality.Artificial skin could help rehabilitation and enhance virtual reality EPFL scientists have developed a soft artificial skin that provides haptic feedback and - thanks to a sophisticated self-sensing mechanism - has the potential to instantaneously adapt to a wearer's movements.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 26.09.2019
A planet that should not exist
A planet that should not exist
Astronomers detected a giant planet orbiting a small star. The planet has much more mass than theoretical models predict. While this surprising discovery was made by a Spanish-German team at an observatory in southern Spain, researchers at the University of Bern studied how the mysterious exoplanet might have formed.

Innovation - Veterinary Science - 26.09.2019
High-Tech Sensors and Blockchain: New Avenues Towards Elimination of Rabies
High-Tech Sensors and Blockchain: New Avenues Towards Elimination of Rabies
Rabies continues to kill approximately 60,000 people every year, mainly in Africa and Asia. In order to reach the goal to eliminate dog-mediated human rabies worldwide by 2030, integrated strategies, political will and innovations are needed. Swiss TPH is at the forefront of rabies research; from devising high-tech sensors to track dogs in urban settings and employing new mathematical methodologies to investigating blockchain for improved access to post-exposure prophylaxis.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 26.09.2019
Healthy organelles, healthy cells
Healthy organelles, healthy cells
It has recently become clear just how important membraneless organelles are for cells. Now biochemists at ETH Zurich have discovered a novel mechanism that regulates the formation of these organelles. This has laid the foundation for more targeted research into diseases such as Alzheimer's or ALS. For a long time, the contents of cells were thought to be fairly unstructured and chaotic: a mixture of proteins, DNA and a multitude of small metabolic molecules.

Health - Materials Science - 26.09.2019
On the road to safe nanomedicine
On the road to safe nanomedicine
Tiny particles that can fight cancer or that can easily pass through any interface within our body are a great promise for medicine. But there is little knowledge thus far about what exactly will happen to nanoparticles within our tissues and whether or not they can cause disease by themselves. Within an international research consortium, Empa scientists have now developed guidelines that should enable the safe development of nanoparticles for medical use.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.09.2019
Cancer: the origin of genetic mutations
Cancer: the origin of genetic mutations
By linking DNA replication failures in cancer cells to their genetic instability, researchers at UNIGE unveil a mutation mechanism that is essential for cancer development. When a cell divides into two daughter cells, it must replicate its DNA according to a very specific scenario. In the presence of some disruptive elements, however, cancer cells are unable to perform this operation optimally; replication then takes place more slowly and less efficiently.

Pharmacology - Health - 24.09.2019
WHO modifies its recommendations on HIV
WHO modifies its recommendations on HIV
The first results of the NAMSAL study, conducted by Swiss, French and Cameroonian teams, have enabled WHO to revise its AIDS treatment recommendations to better adapt them to the most diverse contexts. Until very recently, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended two drugs† - dolutegravir and efavirenz† - for the treatment of HIV infection.

Environment - 24.09.2019
Better working environment in road construction
Better working environment in road construction
Brooding heat, hot fumes and noisy machines - asphalting roads is hard work. Empa researchers have analysed whether and how much harmful emissions are produced when regular "hot asphalt" or so-called warm asphalt is laid. The result: the more ecological warm asphalt also outperforms the conventional method in terms of emissions.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 24.09.2019
A battery with a twist
A battery with a twist
Markus Niederberger's team of researchers at ETH has used stretchable materials to develop a battery that can be bent, stretched and twisted. For applications in bendable electronic devices, this is precisely the kind of battery they need. Today's electronics industry is increasingly focusing on computers or smartphones with screens that can be folded or rolled.

Life Sciences - Environment - 23.09.2019
Astonishing diversity of sticklebacks discovered in Lake Constance
Astonishing diversity of sticklebacks discovered in Lake Constance
Most recreational fishermen do not take notice of the little threespine stickleback fish - it is too small and spiny to make a good meal. In Lake Constance however, the professional fishermen involuntarily became acquainted with it a few years ago. That's because the stickleback population has exploded in the lake, resulting in half of the fish biomass belonging to this species and them often clogging the fishermen's gill nets.

Environment - 23.09.2019
Daylight levels affect our thermal perception
Daylight levels affect our thermal perception
A pioneering study carried out at EPFL shows that the amount of daylight in a room can influence our thermal comfort and how well we tolerate heat or cold. The findings could be used to improve existing building standards and decrease energy consumption.† The difference between reality and our perception of reality has long intrigued Western philosophers.

Life Sciences - Environment - 23.09.2019
Origin of the diversity of sticklebacks in Lake Constance deciphered
Origin of the diversity of sticklebacks in Lake Constance deciphered
Most recreational fishermen do not take notice of the little threespine stickleback fish - it is too small and spiny to make a good meal. In Lake Constance however, the professional fishermen involuntarily became acquainted with it a few years ago. That's because the stickleback population has exploded in the lake, resulting in half of the fish biomass belonging to this species and them often clogging the fishermen's gill nets.

Life Sciences - 20.09.2019
Why is the brain disturbed by harsh sounds?
Why is the brain disturbed by harsh sounds?
UNIGE researchers have demonstrated how the harsh sounds used in alarm systems hold the brain's attention by stimulating its aversion networks. Why do the harsh sounds emitted by alarms or human shrieks grab our attention? What is going on in the brain when it detects these frequencies' Neuroscientists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and Geneva University Hospitals (HUG), Switzerland, have been analysing how people react when they listen to a range of different sounds, the aim being to establish the extent to which repetitive sound frequencies are considered unpleasant.