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Results 61 - 80 of 279.


Life Sciences - 22.07.2021
Brain 'noise' keeps nerve connections young
Brain ’noise' keeps nerve connections young
Researchers have found that a form of neuron-to-neuron communication that has long been dismissed as 'background noise' is required to keep nerve junctions intact as animals age. The finding suggests that defects in this type of neural communication could contribute to neurodegenerative disorders and other brain conditions.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 22.07.2021
Advancing to the core thanks to marsquakes
Advancing to the core thanks to marsquakes
Researchers at ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich have been able to use seismic data to look inside Mars for the first time. Marsquakes recorded by NASA's InSight lander provided information about the structure of the planet's crust, mantle and core. We know that Earth is made up of layers: a thin crust of light, solid rock surrounds a thick mantle of heavy, viscous rock, which in turn envelopes a core consisting mainly of iron and nickel.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 22.07.2021
The anatomy of a planet
The anatomy of a planet
Researchers at ETH Zurich working together with an international team have been able to use seismic data to look inside Mars for the first time. They measured the crust, mantle and core and narrowed down their composition. The three resulting articles are being published together as a cover story in the journal Science .

Life Sciences - 21.07.2021
Chromosomes separation under focus
Chromosomes separation under focus
A team from the University of Geneva has identified important regulatory mechanisms of the protein responsible for chromosome separation during cell division. During cell division, chromosomes are duplicated and separated so that one copy of each chromosome is inherited by each of the two emerging daughter cells.

Health - 21.07.2021
Cancer: information theory to fight resistance to treatments
Cancer: information theory to fight resistance to treatments
Researchers from the UNIGE and the HUG have used information theory for the first time to monitor in vivo the development of resistance mechanisms to a cancer-targeted therapy. One of the major challenges in modern cancer therapy is the adaptive response of cancer cells to targeted therapies: initially, these therapies are very often effective, then adaptive resistance occurs, allowing the tumor cells to proliferate again.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 21.07.2021
Toxicity testing on the placenta and embryo
Toxicity testing on the placenta and embryo
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a cell culture test to detect substances that are directly or indirectly harmful to embryos. Based on an existing test used for developing new drugs and chemicals, the augmented version is designed to help reduce the number of animal experiments. Drugs must be safe not just for the patients; in the case of pregnant patients, drugs must also be safe for the unborn children still in the womb.

Microtechnics - 21.07.2021
New Algorithm Flies Drones Faster than Human Racing Pilots
New Algorithm Flies Drones Faster than Human Racing Pilots
For the first time an autonomously flying quadrotor has outperformed two human pilots in a drone race. The success is based on a novel algorithm that was developed by researchers of the University of Zurich. It calculates time-optimal trajectories that fully consider the drones' limitations. To be useful, drones need to be quick.

Physics - Chemistry - 20.07.2021
Laser improves the time resolution of CryoEM
Scientists have devised a new method that can speed up the real-time observation capabilities of cryo-electron microscopy. In 2017, Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank, and Richard Henderson won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their contributions to cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM), an imaging technique that can capture pictures of biomolecules such as proteins with atomic precision.

Astronomy / Space Science - 20.07.2021
Xenon Researchers Unite to Build Next-generation Dark Matter Detector
Xenon Researchers Unite to Build Next-generation Dark Matter Detector
The two major competing experiments, XENON/DARWIN at Gran Sasso in Italiy and LUX-ZEPLIN in the US, have now joined forces to work together on a new, single, multi-tonne scale xenon observatory to explore dark matter. The detector will be highly sensitive to a wide range of proposed dark matter particles and their interactions with visible matter.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.07.2021
In vitro Zoo helps in understanding SARS-CoV-2
In vitro Zoo helps in understanding SARS-CoV-2
A team of researchers from the Institute for Infectious Diseases (IFIK) at the University of Bern and the Institute of Virology and Immunology (IVI) have used a unique collection of advanced cell culture models of cells lining the airways from various domesticated and wildlife animals to determine which animals are susceptibly to SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Physics - 19.07.2021
Understanding the physics in new metals
Understanding the physics in new metals
Researchers from the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), working in an international team, have developed a new method for complex X-ray studies that will aid in better understanding so-called correlated metals. These materials could prove useful for practical applications in areas such as superconductivity, data processing, and quantum computers.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 19.07.2021
1,200 new glacial lakes discovered
1,200 new glacial lakes discovered
A comprehensive inventory of Swiss glacial lakes shows how the lake landscape in the high mountains has changed since the end of the Little Ice Age. Due to climate change, the glaciers of the Alps are melting. When the sometimes huge ice fields retreat, they often leave behind depressions and natural dams in the exposed landscape.

Mathematics - 16.07.2021
Four cryptographic vulnerabilities in Telegram
Four cryptographic vulnerabilities in Telegram
An international research team of cryptographers completed a detailed security analysis of the popular Telegram messaging platform identifying several weaknesses in its protocol that demonstrate the product falls short of some essential data security guarantees. Working with only open-source code and without "attacking" any of Telegram's running systems, a small team of international researchers completed a detailed analysis of the company's encryption services.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 16.07.2021
How micro-circuits in the brain regulate fear
How micro-circuits in the brain regulate fear
The brain mechanisms underlying the suppression of fear responses have attracted a lot of attention as they are relevant for therapy of human anxiety disorders. Despite our broad understanding of the different brain regions activated during the experience of fear, how fear responses can be suppressed remains largely elusive.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.07.2021
Why do scientific discovery take so long to reach the general public?
Why do scientific discovery take so long to reach the general public?
SUMMER SERIES: HOW SCIENCE WORKS For scientists, the path from bright idea to finished product is a long one. Prototypes must go through an extensive testing and approval process before they are ready for the market. Let's have a look. The results of scientific research can often bring considerable societal and economic benefits.

Materials Science - Economics / Business - 15.07.2021
Filled energy saving bar
Filled energy saving bar
Insulation webs are essential in aluminum window profiles and facades for good thermal insulation. researchers and their partners have been working for some time on a novel "sandwich" product with an environmentally friendly filling: recycled material from PET bottles. Now the market launch is approaching - with good prospects of success.

Environment - Research Management - 15.07.2021
Open access to Eawag's research results
Open access to Eawag’s research results
Open Science is an important development in science - open access to the results of research. Eawag supports these and makes a growing part of its research data, including descriptions, images and even software, available publicly and free of charge on the Eawag platform ERIC or, in special cases, on discipline-specific, international databases.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.07.2021
Why do scientific discoveries take long to reach the general public?
Why do scientific discoveries take long to reach the general public?
SUMMER SERIES: HOW SCIENCE WORKS For scientists, the path from bright idea to finished product is a long one. Prototypes must go through an extensive testing and approval process before they are ready for the market. Let's have a look. The results of scientific research can often bring considerable societal and economic benefits.

Environment - 14.07.2021
Planting oats to study the effects of air pollution
Planting oats to study the effects of air pollution
A team of scientists turned Bois-Chamblard park in Buchillon, on Lake Geneva, into a temporary research station for collecting experimental data. Their goal is to better understand how anthropogenic air pollution affects plant growth. What role does air pollution play in plant growth? That's the question a cross-disciplinary team of scientists has set out to answer.

Life Sciences - 14.07.2021
What does the sleeping brain think about?
What does the sleeping brain think about?
Thanks to a unique system that decodes brain activity during sleep, a team from the University of Geneva is deciphering the neuronal mechanisms of memory consolidation. We sleep on average one third of our time. But what does the brain do during these long hours? Using an artificial intelligence approach capable of decoding brain activity during sleep, scientists at the University of Geneva , Switzerland, were able to glimpse what we think about when we are asleep.

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