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Results 41 - 60 of 224.


Computer Science / Telecom - 05.11.2018
VRTIGO lets you test your nerves in virtual reality
VRTIGO lets you test your nerves in virtual reality
EPFL researchers have developed a virtual-reality program that examines how users - equipped with a headset and sensors - react to a vertiginous stroll. The system will be presented at the Geneva International Film Festival on 5-10 November. Why do some people react more strongly than others when faced with the unknown? Researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Behavioral Genetics, headed by Professor Carmen Sandi, have set out to learn more with a new virtual reality program.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.11.2018
Clues to making drugs for
Clues to making drugs for "undruggable" targets
Nicolas Thom's group at the FMI has joined forces with the group of Benjamin Ebert at Harvard's Broad Institute to show how thalidomide analogs mediate degradation of many more proteins than previously anticipated. These proteins - zinc finger transcription factors - play a role in cancer and developmental diseases but are difficult drug targets.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.10.2018
Breakthrough neurotechnology for treating paralysis
Three patients with chronic paraplegia were able to walk over ground thanks to precise electrical stimulation of their spinal cords via a wireless implant. Researchers have shown that, after a few months of training, the patients were able to control previously paralyzed leg muscles even in the absence of electrical stimulation.

Agronomy / Food Science - 30.10.2018
Divona - Agroscope's New Disease-Resistant White Grape Variety
Divona - Agroscope’s New Disease-Resistant White Grape Variety
Bern, 30.10.2018 - Agroscope, the Swiss federal centre of excellence for agricultural research, is launching the first multiresistant white grape variety, Divona. The fruit of twenty years of research, Divona is resistant to fungal diseases, and well-suited for the production of high-quality wines - two characteristics that make it a popular variety for viticulture and winemaking.

Environment - 30.10.2018
Calculating Switzerland's energy carbon footprint more accurately
Calculating Switzerland's energy carbon footprint more accurately
By developing a method for calculating the carbon footprint of energy used in Switzerland on an hourly basis rather than as a yearly average, EPFL researchers have shed important light on an otherwise obscure industry. Despite recent advances in power grid technology, engineers still struggle to measure the carbon footprint of one kilowatt-hour (kWh) of energy used in Switzerland.

Health - Innovation / Technology - 30.10.2018
Innovations in ultrasound imaging improve breast cancer detection
Innovations in ultrasound imaging improve breast cancer detection
A new ultrasound technique can help distinguish benign breast tumours from malignant ones. The technology was developed with support from the Swiss National Science Foundation. Ultrasound is one of the three main technologies used in medical imaging. It is more compact and affordable than nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, and safer than x-rays.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.10.2018
Dead or alive?
Dead or alive?
Probiotics - live bacteria with beneficial effects on human health - are believed to hold out great promise for certain therapeutic applications. But do these bacteria remain viable when they are frozen or freeze-dried for storage? Eawag's expertise in drinking water microbiology enabled to it provide valuable support for a study of gut microbes carried out in the Food Biotechnology Laboratory at ETH Zurich.

Computer Science / Telecom - Chemistry - 29.10.2018
Next generation of watch springs
Next generation of watch springs
What happens when something keeps getting smaller and smaller? This is the type of question Empa researcher Johann Michler and his team are investigating. As a by-product of their research completely novel watch springs could soon be used in Swiss timepieces. Applied research is not always initiated by industry - but oftentimes it yields results that can swiftly be implemented by companies.

Physics - Chemistry - 29.10.2018
AI and NMR spectroscopy determine atoms configuration in record time
AI and NMR spectroscopy determine atoms configuration in record time
EPFL scientists have developed a machine-learning approach that can be combined with experiments to determine, in record time, the location of atoms in powdered solids. Their method can be applied to complex molecules containing thousands of atoms and could be of particular interest to the pharmaceutical industry.

Physics - Chemistry - 26.10.2018
Making the impossible possible
Making the impossible possible
A new material for energy-efficient data storage reaches computer operating temperature Multiferroics are considered miraculous materials for future data storage - as long as their special properties can be preserved at computer operating temperatures. This task has now been accomplished by researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, with colleagues from Institut Laue-Langevin ILL in Grenoble.

Microtechnics - 25.10.2018
Small flying robots able to pull objects up to 40 times their weight
Researchers from EPFL and Stanford have developed small drones that can land and then move objects that are 40 times their weight, with the help of powerful winches, gecko adhesives and microspines. A closed door is just one of many obstacles that no longer pose a barrier to the small flying robots developed jointly by Stanford University and Ecole Polytechnique Fdrale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland.

Transport - Computer Science / Telecom - 25.10.2018
A fine-tuned laser welds more effectively
Using laser technology Empa scientists optimized a technique to weld the electronics of implantable pacemakers and defibrillators into a titanium case. The medtech company Medtronic is now using the method worldwide to produce these devices. In Tolochenaz (Canton of Vaud) the US medtech company Medtronic produces one out of five heart pacemakers available on the global market and one out of four defibrillators.

Health - Chemistry - 24.10.2018
A type of moss could prove to be more medically effective than hemp
A type of moss could prove to be more medically effective than hemp
Media releases, information for representatives of the media Media Relations (E) In collaboration with colleagues from the ETH Zurich, researchers at the University of Bern have for the first time investigated a substance found in liverwort, which resembles THC. The psychoactive substance, which is consumed as a "legal high", also exerts analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, which might be superior to that of THC.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.10.2018
Anti-aging molecule NAD+ gets a boost from blocking an enzyme
Scientists at EPFL have found a new way to boost the famous anti-aging molecule NAD+ in the kidney and liver by blocking an enzyme that limits its production. Publishing in Nature, the researchers have also developed two enzyme blockers that are shown to protect against kidney and liver disease. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is a major player in nutrition today.

Health - 24.10.2018
Air Pollution and Noise Increase Risk for Heart Attacks
Air Pollution and Noise Increase Risk for Heart Attacks
Air pollution and transportation noise are both associated with an increased risk of heart attacks. Studies on air pollution, which do not take into account traffic noise, tend to overestimate the long-term effect of air pollution on heart attacks. These are the results of a study conducted by researchers from the University of Basel and the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, published in the European Heart Journal.

Health - 24.10.2018
Air Pollution and Noise Increase Risk for Heart Attacks
Air Pollution and Noise Increase Risk for Heart Attacks
Air pollution and transportation noise are both associated with an increased risk of heart attacks. Studies on air pollution, which do not take into account traffic noise, tend to overestimate the long-term effect of air pollution on heart attacks. These are the results of a study conducted by the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, and published today in the European Heart Journal.

Life Sciences - 23.10.2018
Nerve-on-a-chip platform makes neuroprosthetics more effective
Nerve-on-a-chip platform makes neuroprosthetics more effective
EPFL scientists have developed a miniaturized electronic platform for the stimulation and recording of peripheral nerve fibers on a chip. By modulating and rapidly recording nerve activity with a high signal-to-noise ratio, the platform paves the way to using chips to improve neuroprosthetic designs. Neuroprosthetics - implants containing multi-contact electrodes that can substitute certain nerve functionalities - have the potential to work wonders.

Life Sciences - 22.10.2018
New technique reveals limb control in flies - and maybe robots
New technique reveals limb control in flies - and maybe robots
A new neural recording technique developed by EPFL bioengineers enables for the first time the comprehensive measurement of neural circuits that control limb movement. Tested on the fruit fly, results from the technique may inspire the development of more sophisticated robotic control approaches. One of the major goals of biology, medicine, and robotics is to understand how limbs are controlled by circuits of neurons working together.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.10.2018
Roche’s Alecensa (alectinib) significantly reduced the risk of disease worsening or death as a first-line treatment in Asian patients with ALK-positive advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer
Roche's Alecensa (alectinib) significantly reduced the risk of disease worsening or death as a first-line treatment in Asian patients with ALK-positive advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer Head-to-head phase III study of Alecensa versus crizotinib in Asian patient population showed a reduction in the risk of disease worsening or death by 78% Alecensa lowered the risk of tumour spread or growth in the brain or central nervous system

Life Sciences - Environment - 22.10.2018
Facilitating handwashing where water is scarce
Facilitating handwashing where water is scarce
Even though the water we've used for washing our hands is barely contaminated, it usually disappears down the drain, never to be used again. A newly developed system allows handwashing water to be recycled, thus not only saving water, but also helping to prevent infectious diseases in developing countries.