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Results 41 - 60 of 320.


Health - Life Sciences - 06.07.2021
Early detection of dementia
Early detection of dementia
Alzheimer's and other dementias are among the most widespread diseases today. Diagnosis is complex and can often only be established with certainty late in the course of the disease. A team of researchers, together with clinical partners, is now developing a new diagnostic tool that can detect the first signs of neurodegenerative changes using a sensor belt.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.07.2021
Covid long affects four out of ten people
Covid long affects four out of ten people
More than seven months after contracting the virus, nearly 40% of symptomatic people who test positive for SARS-CoV-2 still have symptoms, reveals a study by the UNIGE and the HUG. A study by Geneva University Hospitals (HUG) and the University of Geneva on the long-term follow-up of symptomatic individuals who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 has revealed that 39% of patients report residual symptoms seven to nine months after contracting the virus.

Chemistry - Physics - 05.07.2021
Machine learning cracks the oxidation states of crystal structures
Machine learning cracks the oxidation states of crystal structures
Chemical engineers at EPFL have developed a machine-learning model that can predict a compound's oxidation state, a property that is so essential that many chemists argue it must be included in the periodic table. Chemical elements make up pretty much everything in the physical world. As of 2016, we know of 118 elements, all of which can be found categorized in the famous periodic table that hangs in every chemistry lab and classroom.

Health - Pharmacology - 02.07.2021
Cancer: immunotherapies without side effects?
Cancer: immunotherapies without side effects?
By identifying the mechanism of toxicity induced by immunotherapies, scientists from the University of Geneva and from the Harvard Medical School are paving the way for cancer treatments with fewer side effects. In recent years, immunotherapy has revolutionised the field of cancer treatment. However, inflammatory reactions in healthy tissues frequently trigger side effects that can be serious and lead to the permanent discontinuation of treatment.

Civil Engineering - Environment - 02.07.2021
Better planning can reduce the urban heat island effect
Better planning can reduce the urban heat island effect
In his PhD thesis, EPFL researcher Martí Bosch proposes a method for spatially quantifying the impact of mitigation measures - planting green spaces and using different building materials - on the urban heat island effect. During hot weather, cities are warmer than the surrounding rural areas. This well-known phenomenon - known as the urban heat island effect - is particularly acute at night when concrete and asphalt release the heat stored up during the day.

Physics - 01.07.2021
A crystal made of electrons
A crystal made of electrons
Researchers at ETH Zurich have succeeded in observing a crystal that consists only of electrons. Such Wigner crystals were already predicted almost ninety years ago but could only now be observed directly in a semiconductor material. Crystals have fascinated people through the ages. Who hasn't admired the complex patterns of a snowflake at some point, or the perfectly symmetrical surfaces of a rock crystal? The magic doesn't stop even if one knows that all this results from a simple interplay of attraction and repulsion between atoms and electrons.

Computer Science - Physics - 01.07.2021
A new collaboration points to the future of data
EPFL and the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) join forces to establish a new PSI research division: Scientific Computing, Theory, and Data. In collaboration with EPFL, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) is officially expanding its own focus areas and establishing a new research division: Scientific Computing, Theory, and Data.

Physics - 01.07.2021
Scalable manufacturing of integrated optical frequency combs
Scalable manufacturing of integrated optical frequency combs
A collaboration between EPFL and UCSB has developed a long-anticipated breakthrough, and demonstrated CMOS technology - used for building microprocessors and memory chips - that allows wafer-scale manufacturing of chip-scale optical frequency combs. Optical frequency combs consist of light frequencies made of equidistant laser lines.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.06.2021
Unlocking the power of the microbiome
Unlocking the power of the microbiome
Not only animals and humans host a complex community of microorganisms - plants do this as well. Researchers at ETH Zurich have recently published two new studies that shed light on fundamental aspects of these close - and often overlooked - relationships. Hundreds of different bacterial species live in and on leaves and roots of plants.

Electroengineering - Physics - 29.06.2021
Stretching changes the electronic properties of graphene
Stretching changes the electronic properties of graphene
The electronic properties of graphene can be specifically modified by stretching the material evenly, say researchers at the University of Basel. These results open the door to the development of new types of electronic components. Graphene consists of a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice.

Environment - Life Sciences - 29.06.2021
Aquatic life underground
Aquatic life underground
Groundwater is also an ecosystem, but little is known about the biodiversity underground. researchers have now documented the diversity of life in Swiss groundwater in a pilot study - and discovered previously unknown species of amphipods in the process. Here they relied on a citizen science approach.

Life Sciences - 29.06.2021
How proteins bind 'hidden' DNA
How proteins bind ’hidden’ DNA
How can proteins bind DNA in the cell nucleus, where it is present in form of chromatin, tightly wrapped around histones and therefore mostly inaccessible? Recently, several studies began to uncover the various strategies used by DNA-binding proteins to solve this problem. In a Cell "Leading Edge review", Alicia Michael and Nico Thomä look at these findings and highlight general principles that aim to help predict how a protein recognizes a specific stretch of DNA, even when "hidden" in chromatin.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.06.2021
Managing attention deficit disorder by training the brain
Managing attention deficit disorder by training the brain
A team from the UNIGE and the HUG has found that a special type of brain training based on the principle of 'neurofeedback' enables people with attention deficit disorder to improve their ability to concentrate. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) affects about 7% of children, with a two out of three chance of persisting into adulthood.

Life Sciences - 28.06.2021
Unusual prey: spiders eating snakes
Unusual prey: spiders eating snakes
There are spiders that eat snakes. Observations of snake-eating spiders have been reported around the world. Two researchers from Basel and the US consolidated and analyzed over 300 reports of this unusual predation strategy. Spiders are primarily insectivores, but they occasionally expand their menu by catching and eating small snakes.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 28.06.2021
Optimising nature
Optimising nature
Today, molecular genetic methods can be used to breed sustainable crops - such as multinutrient rice. Researchers are calling for the risk of new plant varieties to be assessed not on the basis of the breeding method, but on the basis of their characteristics. When it comes to food, many people yearn for nature in its most pristine state.

Environment - 28.06.2021
New model simulates the tsunamis caused by iceberg calving
New model simulates the tsunamis caused by iceberg calving
A team of scientists has developed a new model for simulating both iceberg calving and the tsunamis that are triggered as a result. Their method can help improve hazard assessment in coastal areas and refine the empirical calving models used to evaluate rising sea levels. Johan Gaume, an EPFL expert in avalanches and geomechanics, has turned his attention to ice.

Astronomy / Space Science - Economics / Business - 28.06.2021
Unique exoplanet photobombs CHEOPS study of nearby star system
Unique exoplanet photobombs CHEOPS study of nearby star system
While studying two exoplanets in a bright nearby star system, the CHEOPS satellite has unexpectedly spotted the system's third known planet crossing the face of the star. This transit reveals exciting details about a rare planet -with no known equivalent-, as the scientific team led by the Universities of Geneva and Bern, and members of the National Center of Competence in Research PlanetS, point out.

Environment - Materials Science - 25.06.2021
Crown ethers improve perovskite solar cell stability
Crown ethers improve perovskite solar cell stability
Scientists have used an unprecedented method with multimodal host-guest complexation to greatly improve the stability of perovskite solar cells while also reducing the release of lead into the environment. Perovskites are hybrid compounds made from metal halides and organic constituents, and show great potential in a range of applications, e.g. LED lights, lasers, and photodetectors.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.06.2021
Preventing the break-in of the toxoplasmosis parasite
Preventing the break-in of the toxoplasmosis parasite
Scientists from the universities of Geneva and Zurich and the PSI have identified the structure and functions of RON13, an enzyme of the toxoplasmosis parasite that is essential for the infectious mechanism in humans. Toxoplasma gondii , the parasite responsible for toxoplasmosis, is capable of infecting almost all cell types.

Chemistry - 24.06.2021
An artificial leaf made from semiconducting polymers
An artificial leaf made from semiconducting polymers
Scientists are generating oxygen from sunlight, water and semiconducting polymers. They present a promising way towards economical and scalable solar fuel production. Natural photosynthesis evolved to covert water and sunlight into oxygen (O2) and stored chemical energy. In plants this process is not very efficient, however the possibility to convert sunlight into chemical fuel in an economical and globally scalable manner is a very attractive method for reducing our dependence on fossil fuels.

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