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Results 41 - 60 of 316.


Physics - Chemistry - 27.05.2021
Shiny mega-crystals that build themselves
Shiny mega-crystals that build themselves
An international team led by Empa and ETH Zurich researchers is playing with shape-engineered nanoscale building blocks that are up to 100-times larger than atoms and ions. And although these nano "Lego bricks" interact with each other with forces vastly different and much weaker than those holding atoms and ions together, they form crystals all by themselves, the structures of which resemble the ones of natural minerals.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 26.05.2021
Atmospheric inputs of nutrients to soil to decrease in the future
Atmospheric inputs of nutrients to soil to decrease in the future
The shift from fossil to renewable energy sources is essential for climate mitigation but will also significantly reduce the atmospheric input of the nutrients sulphur and selenium into soils. Sustainable solutions are therefore needed to supply intensively used agricultural soils with sufficient nutrients and to ensure a safe and healthy diet for the world's population.

Health - Life Sciences - 26.05.2021
Engineered protein gives an energetic boost to cancer-fighting cells
Engineered protein gives an energetic boost to cancer-fighting cells
Scientists have discovered that an engineered interleukin-10-Fc fusion protein can boost the effectiveness of exhausted T lymphocytes - our body's immune cells for fighting cancer, by reprograming their metabolism.  One of the many treatment options available for cancer today is immunotherapy, which involves stimulating a patient's immune system to produce lymphocytes (such as T cells) that go on to kill the tumor.

Life Sciences - 26.05.2021
What the new pangenome reveals about bovine genes
What the new pangenome reveals about bovine genes
When researchers at ETH Zurich compared the reference genomes between several breeds of domestic cattle and closely related wild cattle, they discovered genes with previously unknown functions. Modern genetic research often works with what are known as reference genomes. Such a genome comprises data from DNA sequences that scientists have assembled as a representative example of the genetic makeup of a species.

Physics - Electroengineering - 25.05.2021
'Bite' defects in bottom-up graphene nanoribbons
’Bite’ defects in bottom-up graphene nanoribbons
Scientists at Empa and EPFL have identified a new type of defect as the most common source of disorder in on-surface synthesized graphene nanoribbons, a novel class of carbon-based materials that may prove extremely useful in next-generation electronic devices. The researchers identified the atomic structure of these so-called "bite" defects and investigated their effect on quantum electronic transport.

Astronomy / Space Science - 25.05.2021
The Universe is hotter than expected
The Universe is hotter than expected
Researchers at the University of Geneva have succeeded in reconciling cosmological theory and observations of the Universe by considering that it is hotter than previously thought. Astrophysicists still encounter various inconsistencies between cosmological theory and measurements made with various research instruments.

Sport - Life Sciences - 24.05.2021
How tendons become stiffer and stronger
How tendons become stiffer and stronger
Researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich deciphered the cellular mechanisms through which tendons can adapt to mechanical stresses. People who carry a certain variant of a gene that is key to this mechanism show improved jumping performance. Tendons are what connect muscles to bones.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.05.2021
Bile acids trigger satiety in the brain
Bile acids trigger satiety in the brain
Scientists have discovered a new role for bile acids: they curb appetite by entering the brain. Their findings provide new insights into the signals and mechanisms by which satiety is controlled and may have implications for treating obesity. Our brain is usually well protected from uncontrolled influx of molecules from the periphery thanks to the blood-brain barrier, a physical seal of cells lining the blood vessel walls.

Life Sciences - 21.05.2021
Overcoming long-term trauma can be facilitated
Overcoming long-term trauma can be facilitated
Older traumatic experiences are harder to get over compared to recent ones, and scientists have started to understand why - at the level of brain circuits. The results point the way for treating long-term trauma. How the brain deals with trauma is complex, and it's intuitive to say that we, as humans, get over trauma differently depending on if it happened a long time ago or if it was recent.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 21.05.2021
Noble gases used to sniff out the pathways of the Emmental's groundwater
Noble gases used to sniff out the pathways of the Emmental’s groundwater
An Eawag researcher has helped to develop a new approach to tracking how river water enters the groundwater. In the test area within the Emmental, the flow time within the aquifer has been shown to be much shorter than previously assumed. This has potential consequences during dry spells. An Eawag researcher has helped to develop a new approach to tracking how river water enters the groundwater.

Environment - Life Sciences - 20.05.2021
Young Orangutans Have Sex-Specific Role Models
Young Orangutans Have Sex-Specific Role Models
Social learning in orangutans is shaped by their sex. Young males learn their foraging behavior from unrelated members of the group, while young females get their skills by observing their mothers. These different sets of ecological knowledge help secure their survival. Orangutans are closely related to humans.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.05.2021
Cholesterol Levels Sustainably Lowered Using Base Editing
Base editing is a novel gene editing approach that can precisely change individual building blocks in a DNA sequence. By installing such a point mutation in a specific gene, an international research team led by the University of Zurich has succeeded in sustainably lowering high LDL cholesterol levels in the blood of mice and macaques.

Agronomy / Food Science - History / Archeology - 18.05.2021
Swiss farmers contributed to the domestication of the opium poppy
Swiss farmers contributed to the domestication of the opium poppy
Fields of opium poppies once bloomed where the Zurich Opera House underground garage now stands. Through a new analysis of archaeological seeds, researchers at the University of Basel have been able to bolster the hypothesis that prehistoric farmers throughout the Alps participated in domesticating the opium poppy.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.05.2021
New Technology Makes Tumor Eliminate Itself
New Technology Makes Tumor Eliminate Itself
A new technology enables the body to produce therapeutic agents on demand at the exact location where they are needed. The innovation could reduce the side effects of cancer therapy and may hold the solution to better delivery of Covid-related therapies directly to the lungs. Scientists at the University of Zurich have modified a common respiratory virus, called adenovirus, to act like a Trojan horse to deliver genes for cancer therapeutics directly into tumor cells.

Microtechnics - 18.05.2021
Helping drone swarms avoid obstacles without hitting each other
Engineers at EPFL have developed a predictive control model that allows swarms of drones to fly in cluttered environments quickly and safely. It works by enabling individual drones to predict their own behavior and that of their neighbors in the swarm. There is strength in numbers. That's true not only for humans, but for drones too.

Environment - Architecture - 18.05.2021
Rising energy demand for cooling
Rising energy demand for cooling
Climate-related temperature rises will further increase the cooling demand of buildings. A projection by researchers based on data from the NEST building and future climate scenarios for Switzerland shows that this increase in energy demand for cooling is likely to be substantial and could have a strong impact on our future - electrified - energy system.

Health - 17.05.2021
Shortcut for dendritic cells
Shortcut for dendritic cells
During an inflammatory response, things need to happen quickly: ETH Zurich researchers have recently discovered that certain immune cells that function as security guards can use a shortcut to get from the tissue to lymph nodes. In its response to pathogens and vaccines, our immune system relies on dendritic cells.

Computer Science - 17.05.2021
Quantum computing: cold chips can control qubits
Quantum computing: cold chips can control qubits
A cryogenic controller chip opens the door to solving the 'wiring bottleneck' and subsequently to realize a fully integrated, scalable quantum computer. A research from QuTech in the Netherlands, from Intel Corp and from EPFL. A specially designed chip to control qubits can operate at extremely low temperatures, and opens the door to solving the 'wiring bottleneck'.

Health - 14.05.2021
How healthy is your digital twin?
How healthy is your digital twin?
Digital twins - a savvy combination of artificial intelligence and personal data - have already begun to revolutionize the way healthcare is provided. But they raise a lot of ethical and legal questions, especially given the vast amounts of medical data that must be collected to train artificial intelligence algorithms.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.05.2021
The Achilles heel of the Coronavirus
The Achilles heel of the Coronavirus
SARS-CoV-2 is critically dependent on a special mechanism for the production of its proteins. A collaborative team led by a research group at ETH Zurich obtained molecular insights into this process and demonstrated that it can be inhibited by chemical compounds, thereby significantly reducing viral replication in infected cells.