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Results 41 - 60 of 234.


Life Sciences - 16.10.2018
A Selfish Gene Makes Mice into Migrants
A Selfish Gene Makes Mice into Migrants
House mice carrying a specific selfish supergene move from one population to another much more frequently than their peers. This finding of a study shows for the first time that a gene of this type can influence animal migratory behavior. It could help in dealing with invasive plagues of mice. Usually the cooperation of genes helps an organism to grow and flourish.

Computer Science / Telecom - 16.10.2018
Using mobile data to model the drinking habits of Swiss youth
Using mobile data to model the drinking habits of Swiss youth
Researchers have carried out a study using smartphone data from young Swiss people to better understand the circumstances in which they are most likely to drink. A computer model developed from the data can estimate, with over 75% accuracy, whether alcohol was consumed on a given weekend night. Do young people drink more out on the town or at a friend's place?

Astronomy / Space Science - 16.10.2018
Journey to Mercury with Involvement from Bern
Journey to Mercury with Involvement from Bern
On Saturday 20 October 2018, at 03:45 a.m. CET, the BepiColombo space probe is to set off on its journey to Mercury from the European spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. On board the European Space Agency (ESA) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)'s joint space probe are instruments which were designed and built at the Physics Institute of the University of Bern: the laser altimeter BELA-the largest and most sensitive instrument of the mission-and the innovative mass spectrometer STROFIO.

Computer Science / Telecom - 15.10.2018
Ultra-light gloves let users "touch" virtual objects
Scientists from EPFL and ETH Zurich have developed an ultra-light glove - weighing less than 8 grams per finger- that enables users to feel and manipulate virtual objects. Their system provides extremely realistic haptic feedback and could run on a battery, allowing for unparalleled freedom of movement.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.10.2018
Roche launches NGS AVENIO Tumor Tissue Analysis Kits for oncology research
Ready-to-use kits determine genomic characteristics of solid tumours Optimized workflow to generate results in house Software analysis allows correlation to AVENIO ctDNA NGS kits Roche today announced the global commercial launch of three new next-generation sequencing (NGS) AVENIO Tumor Tissue Analysis Kits - the AVENIO Tumor Tissue Targeted Kit, Expanded Kit and Surveillance Kit.

Environment - 15.10.2018
Saving water - but not at any cost
Saving water - but not at any cost
Global trade is saving water on balance. In principle, this is a good thing. However, the water budget has its dark side - a fact which Eawag researchers have now brought to light. Virtual water is the term used to describe water that is used in the production of a product. The amount used varies according to the place where the products are produced.

Health - 11.10.2018
Medication you can wear
Medication you can wear
Drug-releasing textiles could, for instance, be used to treat skin wounds. Empa researchers are currently developing polymer fibers that can be equipped with drugs. The smart fibers recognize the need for therapy all by themselves and dose the active ingredients with precision and accuracy. For the «Self Care Materials» project, fibers are produced from biodegradable polymers using various processes.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.10.2018
Link between Gut Flora and Multiple Sclerosis Discovered
Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's own immune system attacks and damages the protective coating around nerve cells. This coating is made up of myelin - a biological membrane of protein and fatty substances - which is why research efforts to find the disease's target antigen have so far focused on the myelin membrane's components.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 11.10.2018
Sediment bypass tunnels and biodiversity
Sediment bypass tunnels and biodiversity
Mountain rivers swollen by heavy rainfall deposit large amounts of sediment in reservoirs. To prevent the loss of storage capacity, some reservoirs are equipped with bypass tunnels which convey sediment-laden waters to downstream reaches. The fact that such tunnels offer ecological benefits as well as economic advantages was shown, for example, by a study carried out on the Solis reservoir in Graubünden.

Life Sciences - Physics / Materials Science - 10.10.2018
This time, it's all bio: SwissFEL makes protein structures visible
This time, it’s all bio: SwissFEL makes protein structures visible
Successful pilot experiment on biomolecules at the newest large research facility of PSI For the development of new medicinal agents, accurate knowledge of biological processes in the body is a prerequisite. Here proteins play a crucial role. At the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, the X-ray free-electron laser SwissFEL has now, for the first time, directed its strong light onto protein crystals and made their structures visible.

Careers / Employment - 10.10.2018
Foreign employees feel well-integrated at the workplace
Foreign employees feel well-integrated at the workplace
More than half of foreign employees in Switzerland feel well-integrated in their work environment. Language difficulties serve as one of the main reasons for a lack of integration. This is concluded by the latest issue of the Swiss HR Barometer issued by the Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich and the Universities of Lucerne and Zurich.

Health - 10.10.2018
Larger Families Reduce Cancer Risk
Larger Families Reduce Cancer Risk
Researchers from the Institute of Evolutionary Medicine of the University of Zurich and the Adelaide Medical School have analyzed data from 178 countries and found a link between family size and cancer risk. Worldwide the incidence of various types of cancer increases with smaller family size. “And this relationship is independent of income, levels of urbanization and age,” explains Professor Maciej Henneberg, academic guest at UZH and senior author of the study.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.10.2018
Breadth of data at ECTRIMS underpins Novartis’ relentless commitment to decoding the science of multiple sclerosis (MS) and decreasing the patient burden
Breadth of data at ECTRIMS underpins Novartis' relentless commitment to decoding the science of multiple sclerosis (MS) and decreasing the patient burden 33 abstracts from the leading MS portfolio include data for Gilenya (fingolimod), and investigational drugs siponimod (BAF312) and ofatumumab (OMB157)   New research will be presented on neurofilaments, a biomarker for MS that can be detected in the blood and could reimagine the way treatments

Electroengineering - 10.10.2018
Tax incentives reduce energy consumption - if effectively implemented
Tax incentives reduce energy consumption - if effectively implemented
By studying the effects of Basel's electricity levy, researchers at the University of Lucerne investigated how tax incentives work in practice and how their impact on energy consumption could be increased. The National Council and the Council of States decided not to debate the proposals of the Federal Council on the second phase of the Energy Strategy 2050 concerning the climate and energy tax incentive KELS.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.10.2018
A study to maintain food security in Uganda
A study to maintain food security in Uganda
By identifying the genes involved in resisting Africa's most widespread cattle disease, researchers at EPFL have developed a map of Uganda showing cattle farmers where the riskiest areas are. "We hope that our research will have an impact, because it addresses some major issues regarding food security in Africa over the medium and long term," says Stéphane Joost, who works in EPFL's Laboratory of Geographic Information Systems (LASIG) and is the corresponding author of a study recently published in scientific review Frontiers in Genetics .

Astronomy / Space Science - 09.10.2018
The Stuff that Planets Are Made of
Is there a second Earth out there in space? Our knowledge of planetary systems far, far away is increasing constantly, as new technologies continue to sharpen our gaze into space. To date, 3,700 planets have already been discovered outside our solar system. The planetary masses and radii of these exoplanets can be used to infer their mean density, but not their exact chemical composition and structure.

Physics / Materials Science - Chemistry - 09.10.2018
Metal leads to the desired configuration
Metal leads to the desired configuration
Scientists at the University of Basel have found a way to change the spatial arrangement of bipyridine molecules on a surface. These potential components of dye-sensitized solar cells form complexes with metals and thereby alter their chemical conformation. The results of this interdisciplinary collaboration between chemists and physicists from Basel were recently published in the scientific journal ACS Omega.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.10.2018
Improving paleotemperature reconstruction: Swiss lakes as a model system
Improving paleotemperature reconstruction: Swiss lakes as a model system
For years, scientists have been trying to determine the climate of the past in order to make better predictions about future climate conditions. Now, there has been a breakthrough in the methodology of climate reconstruction based on microbial molecular fossils. Researchers under the direction of the University of Basel analyzed sediment samples collected from more than 30 Swiss lakes.

Life Sciences - 09.10.2018
Retention of the regulatory landscape in mitosis
Retention of the regulatory landscape in mitosis
Differential recruitment of proteins to chromatin is fundamental in eukaryotes to regulate transcription, replication, and cell division. Yet it is unclear how the regulatory landscape is transmitted through cell division since many proteins are thought to be evicted during mitosis, when the chromosomes condensate.

Astronomy / Space Science - 08.10.2018
A rare star opens a window on the beginning of time
A rare star opens a window on the beginning of time
EPFL astrophysicists actively participated in the discovery of a very rare star, which is particularly old and metal-poor. As a messenger from the distant past, it will allow the scientists to learn more about the young Universe, right after the Big Bang. "We made a major discovery, which questions our understanding of the formation of the first generations of stars in the universe".