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Results 41 - 60 of 279.


Computer Science - Media - 10.08.2021
Do we live in online bubbles?
Do we live in online bubbles?
Taking a novel perspective, researchers have studied political polarization in online news consumption rather than content production, looking at whether the backlink structure of online news networks alone, or users' explicit reading choices contribute to the partisan divide.

Sport - Health - 09.08.2021
Getting oxygenated blood to exercising muscles
Getting oxygenated blood to exercising muscles
ETH Zurich Professor Katrien De Bock and her team have discovered a certain type of blood vessel cell in muscles that multiplies rapidly upon exercise, thereby forming new blood vessels. Researchers can use this to find novel therapies for vascular disorders of the muscle. "In industrialised countries, the leading cause of surgeons having to amputate a foot or leg is impaired vascular supply to the muscles of diabetic patients," Katrien De Bock says.

Life Sciences - 06.08.2021
Nitrogen inputs in the ancient ocean - underappreciated bacteria step into the spotlight
Nitrogen inputs in the ancient ocean - underappreciated bacteria step into the spotlight
It was long assumed that cyanobacteria were mainly responsible for fixing nitrogen on early Earth, thus making nitrogen available to the biosphere. In a paper published today in "Nature Communications", a team of researchers from Germany and Switzerland now shows that purple sulfur bacteria could have contributed substantially to nitrogen fixation.

Innovation - Economics / Business - 06.08.2021
Startups: Where design and technology meet
Startups: Where design and technology meet
Enabled by Design is a joint EPFL-ECAL program that forges ties between researchers and designers to make it easier to bring new technology to market. Researchers are often the first to see a device's innovative potential. But investors, users and end customers will look not only at its functionality, but also its ergonomics and aesthetics.

Physics - Chemistry - 05.08.2021
A promising breakthrough: Nanocrystals made of amalgam
A promising breakthrough: Nanocrystals made of amalgam
Researchers at ETH have managed to produce nanocrystals made of two different metals using an amalgamation process whereby a liquid metal penetrates a solid one. This new and surprisingly intuitive technique makes it possible to produce a vast array of intermetallic nanocrystals with tailored properties for diverse applications.  Nanocrystals are nanometre-sized spheres consisting of regularly arranged atoms.

Chemistry - 04.08.2021
Illuminating tissue formation
Illuminating tissue formation
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a molecule that fluoresces where new tissue is forming in the body. Alongside helping to detect tumours, the molecule could play a significant role in research of wound healing disorders. Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body. It makes up a third of protein content and single strands assemble to form stable fibres that give structure to connective tissue such as skin, tendons, cartilage and bones.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.08.2021
Bacteria navigate on surfaces using a 'sense of touch'
Bacteria navigate on surfaces using a ’sense of touch’
Researchers have characterized a mechanism that allows bacteria to direct their movement in response to the mechanical properties of the surfaces the microbes move on - a finding that could help fight certain pathogens. Many disease-causing bacteria such as Pseudomonasaeruginosa crawl on surfaces through a walk-like motility known as "twitching".

Health - Pharmacology - 03.08.2021
Breath test to determine correct treatment for epilepsy
Breath test to determine correct treatment for epilepsy
Breath instead of blood: researchers from the University of Basel have developed a new test method to measure treatment success in epilepsy patients. They hope that this will enable doctors to react more precisely when treating the disease. Epilepsy affects some 50 million people worldwide and pharmaceutical treatment of the disease is a tightrope walk, as the dose must be tailored precisely to the individual patient: "Slightly too little and it isn't effective.

Computer Science - 03.08.2021
Running quantum software on a classical computer
Two physicists, from EPFL and Columbia University, have introduced an approach for simulating the quantum approximate optimization algorithm using a traditional computer. Instead of running the algorithm on advanced quantum processors, the new approach uses a classical machine-learning algorithm that closely mimics the behavior of near-term quantum computers.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.08.2021
AI reveals how glucose helps the SARS-CoV-2 virus
AI reveals how glucose helps the SARS-CoV-2 virus
Why do some people get sick and die from COVID-19 while others seem to be completely unaffected? EPFL's Blue Brain Project deployed its powerful brain simulation technology and expertise in cellular and molecular biology to try and answer this question. A group in the Blue Brain assembled an AI tool that could read hundreds of thousands of scientific papers, extract the knowledge and assemble the answer - A machine-generated view of the role of blood glucose levels in the severity of COVID-19 was published today by Frontiers in Public Health, Clinical Diabetes.

Environment - 02.08.2021
Manganese could make luminescent materials and the conversion of sunlight more sustainable
Manganese could make luminescent materials and the conversion of sunlight more sustainable
University of Basel researchers have reached an important milestone in their quest to produce more sustainable luminescent materials and catalysts for converting sunlight into other forms of energy. Based on the cheap metal manganese, they have developed a new class of compounds with promising properties that until now have primarily been found in noble metal compounds.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 02.08.2021
From imaging neurons to measuring their true activity
From imaging neurons to measuring their true activity
Neuroscientists often use calcium imaging to analyze neuronal activity in the intact brain. But this method provides only an indirect and slow measure of action potential firing, creating the need to reliably reconstruct action potentials from calcium signals. Peter Rupprecht, a former PhD candidate in the Friedrich group, developed a novel algorithm based on machine learning that is very effective, easy to use, and highly robust.

Physics - Chemistry - 29.07.2021
High-precision frequency measurement
High-precision frequency measurement
Many scientific experiments require highly precise time measurements with the help of a clearly defined frequency. Now, a new approach allows the direct comparison of frequency measurements in the lab with the atomic clock in Bern, Switzerland. For many scientific experiments, today's researchers require a precise reference frequency that allows them to calibrate the time measurements made by their equipment.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.07.2021
Molecular atlas reveals how brain cells develop
Using a combination of powerful sequencing techniques and mathematical methods, researchers have traced the genetic programs that direct the development of each cell in the brain. This molecular map could help researchers to understand how the brain develops and provide insights into a range of conditions, including brain tumors and neurodevelopmental disorders.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 29.07.2021
Small force, big effect: How the planets could influence the sun
Small force, big effect: How the planets could influence the sun
A new theory supports the controversial hypothesis that the planets affect solar activity. It puts forward a mechanism by which the very small influence of the planets could exert its rhythm on such a large system as the Sun. If the theory is confirmed, it could possibly be used to predict solar activity more accurately.

Environment - Innovation - 28.07.2021
Towards a more affordable analysis of air pollution
Towards a more affordable analysis of air pollution
Scientists have developed a new method for chemical analysis of fine particles that they plan to extend on a large scale - including in developing countries - through an Innosuisse innovation grant award and a new startup. Satoshi Takahama and Nikunj Dudani, two scientists at EPFL's Laboratory of Atmospheric Processes and their Impacts (LAPI), have developed an innovative system that could replace the array of instruments typically used to measure air quality by a single device small enough to fit in a carry-on bag.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.07.2021
More than just walking: a new role for core brain region
More than just walking: a new role for core brain region
For decades, a key brain area has been thought to merely regulate locomotion. Now, a research group at the Biozentrum, University of Basel, and the Friedrich Miescher Institut for Biomedical Research (FMI) has shown that the region is involved in much more than walking, as it contains distinct populations of neurons that control different body movements.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.07.2021
Brain fingerprints help doctors detect neurological disease
Brain fingerprints help doctors detect neurological disease
An EPFL scientist has found that brain fingerprints - or maps of the neural connections within our brain - can be used to detect a decline in cognitive ability. That's because the fingerprints are harder to detect in people who already have mild cognitive impairment. Just like our fingertips, our brains contain an embedded pattern that's different for every individual.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 26.07.2021
On eternal imbalance
On eternal imbalance
Some physical systems, especially in the quantum world, do not reach a stable equilibrium even after a long time. An ETH researcher has now found an elegant explanation for this phenomenon. If you put a bottle of beer in a big bathtub full of ice-cold water, it won't be long before you can enjoy a cold beer.

Environment - Politics - 23.07.2021
Water resources: defusing conflict, promoting cooperation
Water resources: defusing conflict, promoting cooperation
The EU funded project DAFNE has developed a methodology for avoiding conflicts of use in transboundary rivers. The model-based procedure allows for participatory planning and cooperative management of water resources. The aim is now for the DAFNE methodology to be implemented in other regions of the world.

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