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Astronomy / Space Science - 21.05.2018
Cosmic ravioli and spaetzle
Cosmic ravioli and spaetzle
The small inner moons of Saturn look like giant ravioli and spaetzle. Their spectacular shape has been revealed by the Cassini spacecraft. For the first time, researchers of the University of Bern show how these moons were formed. The peculiar shapes are a natural outcome of merging collisions among similar-sized little moons as computer simulations demonstrate.

Life Sciences - Physics / Materials Science - 21.05.2018
Observing cellular activity, one molecule at a time
Using a new mode of atomic force microscopy, researchers at EPFL have found a way to see and measure protein assembly in real time and with unprecedented detail. Proteins and molecules assemble and disassemble naturally as part of many essential biological processes. It is very difficult to observe these mechanisms, which are often complex and take place at the nanometer scale, far smaller than the normal visible range.

Astronomy / Space Science - Computer Science / Telecom - 18.05.2018
Focus on space debris
Focus on space debris
The Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB) has extended its observatory in Zimmerwald with two additional domed structures, and has renovated a dome. As a result, there are now six fully automated telescopes available for observation and specifically for detecting and cataloguing space debris.

Environment - 18.05.2018
Eawag covering Environmental Science & Technology
Eawag covering Environmental Science & Technology
For the second time within short time, Eawag research made it to the cover of the journal "Environmental Science & Technology". In April, Eawag researcher Urs von Gunten and his team's paper on understanding the ozonation of phenols was selected for the ACS Editor's Choice Article and put on the cover of the journal.

Innovation / Technology - Environment - 17.05.2018
Nine at one blow
Nine at one blow
Atmospheric pollutants put a strain on the environment and harbor health hazards for humans. The Empa spin-off MIRO Analytical Technologies developed a technology to simultaneously analyze nine greenhouse gases and pollutants with only one device and at an unprecedented speed and precision. Air pollution is a problem that affects us all.

Computer Science / Telecom - Earth Sciences - 17.05.2018
CrowdWater: An App for Flood Research
CrowdWater: An App for Flood Research
The CrowdWater project, developed by doctoral candidates from the Department of Geography of the University of Zurich, is a citizen science project in the area of hydrology, the science of water. The project collects hydrological data on water levels, streamflows and soil moisture from all over the world.

Innovation / Technology - Environment - 17.05.2018
Nine in one swoop
Nine in one swoop
Atmospheric pollutants put a strain on the environment and harbor health hazards for humans. The Empa spin-off MIRO Analytical Technologies developed a technology to simultaneously analyze nine greenhouse gases and pollutants with only one device and at an unprecedented speed and precision. Air pollution is a problem that affects us all.

Chemistry - Physics / Materials Science - 16.05.2018
«Research should be fun»
«Research should be fun»
Research should set things in motion. This is the motto of Matthias Koebel, Head of Empa's Building Energy Materials and Components lab. The chemist has ambitious goals and successfully combines an inquisitive spirit with entrepreneurial flair. Matthias Koebel is a pragmatic. One who not only understands things but also wants to use them.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 16.05.2018
Ultrafiltration without pressure - the power of gravity
Ultrafiltration without pressure - the power of gravity
Ultrafiltration is one of the techniques currently used for disinfecting water - viruses and bacteria are reliably retained by a membrane with extremely small pores. For more than ten years, Eawag has successfully been carrying out research to determine how this method can function using the effect of gravity on water instead of high pressure, cleaning and chemicals.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Physics / Materials Science - 16.05.2018
Light for biomolecules and super-fast processes
Light for biomolecules and super-fast processes
For the International Day of Light: How PSI scientists study molecules and materials The 16th of May is the International Day of Light. With the help of light, researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI see how molecules assemble and how rapid chemical and physical processes occur on the scale of individual atoms.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Physics / Materials Science - 14.05.2018
Opening: Advanced technology against cancer
Opening: Advanced technology against cancer
New treatment unit for proton therapy at PSI is inaugurated With millimetre precision, certain tumours can be irradiated at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI using protons - that is, positively charged elementary particles.

Life Sciences - 14.05.2018
Nouns Slow Down Our Speech
When we speak, we unconsciously pronounce some words more slowly than others, and sometimes we make brief pauses or throw in meaningless sounds like “uhm”. Such slow-down effects provide key evidence on how our brains process language. They point to difficulties when planning the utterance of a specific word.

Life Sciences - Careers / Employment - 14.05.2018
Spoilt for choice? How neuroscience can explain your attitude toward freedom of choice
Spoilt for choice? How neuroscience can explain your attitude toward freedom of choice
Being spoilt for choice can be a burden or a blessing: People value their freedom of choice differently. Whereas some people happily let others make decisions for them, others might rebel against restrictions of their freedom of choice. Scientists from the University of Bern have now been able to explain the individual attitude toward freedom of choice based on brain activations.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 10.05.2018
Leprosy Possibly Originated in Europe
Leprosy Possibly Originated in Europe
Leprosy is one of the oldest recorded and most stigmatized diseases in human history. The disease was prevalent in Europe until the 16th century and is still endemic in many countries, with over 200,000 new cases reported annually. The bacterium Mycobacterium leprae is the main cause of leprosy. Previous research on the bacterium suggested that it clusters into several strains, only two of which were present in Medieval Europe.

Life Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 10.05.2018
Humans and machines learn together to win a competition
Humans and machines learn together to win a competition
People using brain-computer interface are more efficient when both human and machine are allowed to learn. EPFL researchers trained two tetraplegic users to compete in the international Cybathlon BCI race. Both incrementally learned how to control the BCI, and obtained the best performances at the competition, confirming researchers' hypothesis that mutual learning plays a fundamental role in BCI training.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Innovation / Technology - 09.05.2018
Computer-Designed Customized Regenerative Heart Valves
Computer-Designed Customized Regenerative Heart Valves
Producing living tissue or organs based on human cells is one of the main research fields in regenerative medicine. Tissue engineering, which involves growing replacement parts in the laboratory, forms a key part of this research. The parts can be used to replace defective cells and tissues in the body and restore their normal functioning.

History / Archeology - Literature / Linguistics - 09.05.2018
Left unprinted for lack of interest: the largest German dictionary of the 18th century in Basel
Left unprinted for lack of interest: the largest German dictionary of the 18th century in Basel
For 250 years, the extensive set of manuscripts and papers lay unnoticed in the University Library's basement.

Physics / Materials Science - 08.05.2018
Through the pores into the skin
Through the pores into the skin
Even if the wound looks superficially harmless, steam burns must be cooled persistently. Empa researchers have now been able to show for the first time how hot steam achieves its vicious effect: It penetrates the upper skin layer and can cause severe burns in the lower skin layers - initially almost invisible.

Life Sciences - Environment - 07.05.2018
Carnivores in Captivity Give Birth at the Same Time of Year as Those in the Wild
Carnivores in Captivity Give Birth at the Same Time of Year as Those in the Wild
Many species have a specific mating season when living in their natural habitat. The young animals are usually born in spring when environmental conditions are optimal for their survival, while births at less favorable times such as the start of winter are thus avoided. Depending on whether seasonal reproduction is a strong characteristic of a species or not, the time period for births will be a longer or a shorter window.
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