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Pharmacology - Health - 17.02.2022
Defeating leukaemia cells by depriving them of energy
Defeating leukaemia cells by depriving them of energy
A Swiss-French team that includes scientists has discovered how to trigger apoptosis in leukaemia cells by disrupting their energy maintenance mechanism. Acute myeloid leukaemia, which affects blood and bone marrow cells, is a particularly dangerous form of cancer. More than half of patients under the age of 60 die.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.02.2022
New Blood Marker Provides Insight into MS Disease Activity
New Blood Marker Provides Insight into MS Disease Activity
Nerve damage in multiple sclerosis can be detected via the concentration of neurofilament light chain in the blood. According to researchers from the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel, this neuron-specific protein provides valuable information on future disease course and the effectiveness of therapies.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.02.2022
Multiple Sclerosis: Study with Twins Untangles Environmental and Genetic Influences
Researchers at the University of Zurich and Munich's LMU Klinikum hospital have studied the immune system of pairs of monozygotic twins to identify the influence of the environment and of genetics in cases of multiple sclerosis. In the process, they may have discovered precursor cells of the disease-causing T cells.

Physics - Innovation - 16.02.2022
EPFL and DeepMind use AI to control plasmas for nuclear fusion
EPFL and DeepMind use AI to control plasmas for nuclear fusion
Scientists at EPFL's Swiss Plasma Center and DeepMind have jointly developed a new method for controlling plasma configurations for use in nuclear fusion research. EPFL's Swiss Plasma Center (SPC) has decades of experience in plasma physics and plasma control methods. DeepMind is a scientific discovery company acquired by Google in 2014 that's committed to 'solving intelligence to advance science and humanity.

Transport - 15.02.2022
Feel and see emerging microcracks in airplanes
Feel and see emerging microcracks in airplanes
Together with teams from England and Germany, researchers developed a monitoring system for aircraft components. In the future, minor damage could be detected and monitored during flight without the aircraft having to go into the hangar for maintenance. This will reduce operating costs and increase safety at the same time.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 14.02.2022
DisCo: boosting the efficiency of single-cell RNA sequencing
DisCo: boosting the efficiency of single-cell RNA sequencing
Bioengineers at EPFL have found a way to radically increase the efficiency of single-cell RNA-sequencing, a powerful tool that can -read- the genetic profile of an individual cell. Single-cell RNA sequencing, or -scRNA-seq- for short, is a technique that allows scientists to study the expression of genes in an individual cell within a mixed population - which is virtually how all cells exist in the body's tissues.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 11.02.2022
Studying clouds can provide deeper insight into climate change
Studying clouds can provide deeper insight into climate change
An international team of scientists conducted CALISHTO, a large-scale air measurement campaign in Greece last fall, with the goal of surveying, counting and characterizing the tiny particles and their impact on cloud formation. The goal is to incorporate this information in climate models for improved predictions of clouds, precipitation and climate.

Environment - Health - 11.02.2022
Multi-Insecticide Resistant Malaria Vectors Remain Susceptible to Malathion Insecticide
Multi-Insecticide Resistant Malaria Vectors Remain Susceptible to Malathion Insecticide
Insecticide resistant mosquitoes are a growing concern in malaria control. A study conducted by Swiss TPH and partners raises hope that multi-resistant malaria vectors remain largely susceptible to the insecticide malathion. By studying field mosquito populations in Côte d'Ivoire, the authors found that genes which cause resistance to the widely used pyrethroid insecticides likely increase susceptibility to malathion.

Environment - Materials Science - 11.02.2022
Solar and wind power are key to decarbonising Switzerland
Solar and wind power are key to decarbonising Switzerland
A team from the UNIGE and Empa demonstrate that a mix of photovoltaic and wind power is optimal for reducing the carbon footprint of Swiss electricity consumption . How can we reduce the carbon footprint of electricity consumption in Switzerland? The country relies on electricity imports from fossil fuel power plants, which are major emitters of greenhouse gases.

Astronomy / Space Science - 10.02.2022
ESPRESSO detects the lightest exoplanet
ESPRESSO detects the lightest exoplanet
Thanks to the ESPRESSO spectrograph developed at the University of Geneva, an international team has discovered an ultralight exoplanet in orbit around Proxima Centauri, our closest neighbour. An international team including researchers from the University of Geneva has detected a third candidate planet around our closest neighbor, the star Proxima Centauri.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.02.2022
IOR and IOSI gold medal in lymphomas
The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), the world's leading medical journal, has entrusted the lymphoma group of the Institute of Oncological Research (IOR, affiliated to USI and member of Bios+) and the Oncological Institute of Southern Switzerland (IOSI, Ente Ospedaliero Cantonale) with the task of compiling a state-of-the-art report on malignant lymphomas.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 10.02.2022
Illuminating Real-Time Brain Dynamics of Neuropeptides with a Fluorescent Biosensor
Illuminating Real-Time Brain Dynamics of Neuropeptides with a Fluorescent Biosensor
Neuropeptides play fundamental roles in modulating cellular and circuit functions within the brain. One such signaling molecule - orexin - regulates arousal and wakefulness, and its failure can lead to constant daytime sleepiness (narcolepsy). University of Zurich researchers have now developed a fluorescent orexin biosensor to observe this molecule "live" in the living mouse brain.

Life Sciences - Physics - 10.02.2022
Cellular tornadoes sculpt our organs
Cellular tornadoes sculpt our organs
A team from the UNIGE has demonstrated that cells self-organise to generate forces that model the shapes of our tissues. How are the different shapes of our organs and tissues generated? To answer this question, a team from the University of Geneva , Switzerland, forced muscle cells to spontaneously reproduce simple shapes in vitro .

Environment - Computer Science - 09.02.2022
Artificial intelligence and big data can help preserve wildlife
Artificial intelligence and big data can help preserve wildlife
A team of experts in artificial intelligence and animal ecology have put forth a new, cross-disciplinary approach intended to enhance research on wildlife species and make more effective use of the vast amounts of data now being collected thanks to new technology. Their study appears today. The field of animal ecology has entered the era of big data and the Internet of Things.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 09.02.2022
A new electrolyte for greener and safer batteries
A new electrolyte for greener and safer batteries
A team from the University of Geneva has developed a new material that improves the performance of solid-state sodium batteries, a less dangerous and more durable alternative to lithium. The future of battery technologies lies in sodium. More sustainable than lithium - which currently powers most of our devices and vehicles - sodium is also abundant on the earth's surface.

Environment - 08.02.2022
Arctic Winter Warming Causes Cold Damage in the Subtropics of East Asia
Arctic Winter Warming Causes Cold Damage in the Subtropics of East Asia
Due to climate change, Arctic winters are getting warmer. An international study by researchers shows that Arctic warming causes temperature anomalies and cold damage thousands of kilometers away in East Asia. This in turn leads to reduced vegetation growth, later blossoming, smaller harvests and reduced CO2 absorption by the forests in the region.

Environment - Social Sciences - 08.02.2022
Citizen Science: Knowledge as a weapon in the fight for clean water
Citizen Science: Knowledge as a weapon in the fight for clean water
There is too much nickel, too much arsenic and far too much manganese. The research project by Désirée Ruppen, who is doing her doctorate at the aquatic research institute Eawag and the ETH Zurich, provides watertight proof for the first time of what everyone on the ground already knew. The Deka River in the Hwange district is heavily polluted by coal mining and the coal-fired power plant, and is a serious health risk for the people who drink its water or fish in it.

Health - Social Sciences - 08.02.2022
Altitude Positively Impacts Cardiovascular Health Peruvian Study Finds
Altitude Positively Impacts Cardiovascular Health Peruvian Study Finds
People living in high altitudes are less likely to develop metabolic syndrome, a key indicator of cardiovascular health. A study published today in PLOS One investigated the association between the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and the use of improved cook stoves in the rural Andes in Peru. While the use of these stoves was not found to be related to better metabolic health, body mass index (BMI) and altitude appear to be strong determinants of metabolic syndrome.

Innovation - Environment - 07.02.2022
Making installed train windows permeable to mobile-phone signals
Making installed train windows permeable to mobile-phone signals
EPFL spin-off nu glass has successfully tested a portable system that makes the window panes on railcars permeable to mobile communications. This can bring significant environmental and cost benefits to railway companies and mobile-phone operators, since they'll no longer have to install signal boosters to provide wireless connectivity for passengers.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.02.2022
A bacteria-killing helper against hospital-acquired infections
Bacteriophages are viruses that look like lunar modules. But instead of landing peacefully on celestial bodies, they dock onto bacteria to destroy them a short time later. They need the bacteria as hosts in order to reproduce: By injecting their DNA, they make the bacteria produce new phages until they finally burst.
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