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Results 101 - 120 of 316.


Life Sciences - Health - 24.02.2021
Reactivating Aging Stem Cells in the Brain
Reactivating Aging Stem Cells in the Brain
As people get older, their neural stem cells lose the ability to proliferate and produce new neurons, leading to a decline in memory function. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now discovered a mechanism linked to stem cell aging - and how the production of neurons can be reactivated. The stem cells in our brain generate new neurons throughout life, for example in the hippocampus.

Pharmacology - 23.02.2021
Drug-checking services: effective approach to harm reduction
Drug-checking services: effective approach to harm reduction
Drug-checking services with substance analyses help reduce the risks associated with drug use. A study commissioned by the FOPH shows that this service helps protect users from overdoses and adverse reactions to adulterants. The study also underlines the potential of drug checking for identifying vulnerable individuals at an early stage and for monitoring the drug market.

Computer Science - Environment - 23.02.2021
Scientists begin building highly accurate digital twin of our planet
Scientists begin building highly accurate digital twin of our planet
A digital twin of our planet is to simulate the Earth system in future. It is intended to support policy-makers in taking appropriate measures to better prepare for extreme events. A new strategy paper by European scientists and ETH Zurich computer scientists shows how this can be achieved. To become climate neutral by 2050, the European Union launched two ambitious programmes: " Green Deal " and " DigitalStrategy ".

Physics - Health - 22.02.2021
3D-printing perovskites on graphene makes next-gen X-ray detectors
3D-printing perovskites on graphene makes next-gen X-ray detectors
By using 3D aerosol jet-printing to put perovskites on graphene, scientists at EPFL have made X-ray detectors with record sensitivity that can greatly improve the efficiency and reduce the cost and health hazard of medical imaging devices. Since Wilhelm Röntgen discovered them in 1895, X-rays have become a staple of medical imaging.

Physics - Materials Science - 22.02.2021
Concept for a new storage medium
Concept for a new storage medium
Physicists from Switzerland, Germany and Ukraine have proposed an innovative new data storage medium. The technique is based on specific properties of antiferromagnetic materials that had previously resisted experimental examination. Using nanoscale quantum sensors, an international research team has succeeded in exploring certain previously uncharted physical properties of an antiferromagnetic material.

Computer Science - 22.02.2021
Security flaw detected for the second time in credit cards
After finding a vulnerability in certain credit cards for the first time last year, ETH researchers have now found a way to outsmart the PIN codes for other payment cards. Making a contactless payment with a credit or debit card is quick and easy, and has proved particularly useful during the current pandemic.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 22.02.2021
Martian moons have a common ancestor
Martian moons have a common ancestor
Phobos and Deimos are the remains of a larger Martian moon that was disrupted between 1 and 2.7 billion years ago, say researchers from the Institute of Geophysics at ETH Zurich and the Physics Institute at the University of Zurich. They reached this conclusion using computer simulations and seismic recordings from the InSight Mars mission.

Physics - 19.02.2021
Swimming upstream on sound waves
Swimming upstream on sound waves
Researchers are among the first scientists to have succeeded in propelling microvehicles against a fluid flow using ultrasound. In future, these tiny vehicles are set to be introduced into the human bloodstream, thereby revolutionising the field of medicine. At some point, microvehicles that are small enough to navigate our blood vessels will enable physicians to take biopsies, insert stents and deliver drugs with precision to sites that are difficult to reach, all from inside the body.

Physics - Campus - 19.02.2021
IBM's Quantum computer links two quantum revolutions
IBM's Quantum computer links two quantum revolutions
Using the IBM Q computer, physicists at EPFL have verified for the first time the tight relationship between quantum entanglement and wave-particle duality, showing that the former controls the latter in a quantum system. "It is possible to do experiments in fundamental physics on the remotely accessible IBM Q quantum computer ," says Marc-André Dupertuis, a physicist at EPFL's School of Basic Sciences.

Physics - 19.02.2021
Heat loss control method in fusion reactors
Heat loss control method in fusion reactors
The core of a fusion reactor is incredibly hot. Hydrogen that inevitably escapes from it must be cooled on its way to the wall, as otherwise, the reactor wall would be damaged. Researchers from the Dutch institute DIFFER and EPFL's Swiss Plasma Center have developed a strict measurement and control method for the cooling of very hot particles escaping from fusion plasmas.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 18.02.2021
Human impact on solar radiation levels for decades
Based on the long-term Potsdam radiation time series, ETH Professor Martin Wild and his collaborators have shown that variations in the intensity of sunlight over decades are down to ultra-fine, man-made dirt particles in the atmosphere. In the late 1980s and 1990s, researchers at ETH Zurich discovered the first indications that the amount of sunlight reaching the Earth's surface had been steadily declining since the 1950s.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 18.02.2021
New-found molecular signature keeps key genes ready for action
New-found molecular signature keeps key genes ready for action
During development, scores of molecular signals prod cells to take on specialized identities and functions. In response to some of these signals, the cellular machinery awakens specific genes called ‘immediate early genes' within minutes. The Rijli group has now identified a unique molecular signature that keeps immediate early genes quiet yet poised for rapid activation.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 17.02.2021
On the quest for other earths
On the quest for other earths
An international research team with members from ETH has developed a new method for directly imaging smaller planets in the habitable zone of a neighbouring star system. This opens up new possibilities in the search for extraterrestrial life. In the search for planets capable of sustaining life, an international research team with members from ETH has taken a significant step forward.

Pharmacology - Health - 17.02.2021
Hide-and-Seek Can Lead to Higher Drug Prices
Pharmaceutical manufacturers and national authorities often negotiate secret rebates when determining drug prices. A UZH study shows that these rebate systems may hamper patient access to drugs. In the medium term, this practice can even lead to increasing drug prices. In Switzerland and other European countries, drug prices are regulated to ensure affordable access to drugs.

Physics - Materials Science - 17.02.2021
Novel sandwich technology improves sensitivity of rapid tests
Novel sandwich technology improves sensitivity of rapid tests
Scientists have developed a method for boosting the sensitivity of rapid-detection tests like those used for the new coronavirus. The results of their feasibility study have just been published in Nano Letters. Pregnancy tests and rapid-detection tests for the new coronavirus work in the same way. They contain a surface - usually made of metal - on which chemical nanosensors detect specific compounds in a sample of urine, saliva or blood that indicate the presence of a given protein or part of a virus.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.02.2021
Targeted elimination of leukemic stem cells
Targeted elimination of leukemic stem cells
Cancer research has discovered a further mechanism to combat leukemia: a research team has succeeded in identifying an important signaling pathway for regulating leukemic stem cells. With this discovery, the researchers are expanding the arsenal of potentially highly effective drugs against leukemias ("blood cancers").

Life Sciences - Health - 16.02.2021
Aging: What underlies the mitochondrial stress response
Aging: What underlies the mitochondrial stress response
Scientists at EPFL have discovered certain enzymes that play a central role in the stress responses that defend mitochondria from stress, and promote health and longevity. Probably the most well-known organelle of the cell, mitochondria play a critical role in producing energy from food. So, it's no surprise that mitochondria can get stressed and damaged.

Life Sciences - 15.02.2021
New discovery at the IOR on mechanisms leading to the spread of metastases
New discovery at the IOR on mechanisms leading to the spread of metastases
Prostate cancer research is making further progress with a recent discovery of the Prostate Cancer Biology laboratory at the Institute of Oncology Research (IOR, affiliated to the Università della Svizzera Italiana). A study led by Dr  Giuseppina Carbone has revealed that micro-RNA fragments, released into the body by prostate cancer cells through microscopic vesicles called exosomes, lead to the formation of metastases.

Physics - Electroengineering - 15.02.2021
Kagome graphene promises exciting properties
Kagome graphene promises exciting properties
For the first time, physicists from the University of Basel have produced a graphene compound consisting of carbon atoms and a small number of nitrogen atoms in a regular grid of hexagons and triangles. This honeycomb-structured -kagome lattice- behaves as a semiconductor and may also have unusual electrical properties.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.02.2021
Regular caffeine consumption affects brain structure
Regular caffeine consumption affects brain structure
Coffee, cola or an energy drink: caffeine is the world's most widely consumed psychoactive substance. Researchers from the University of Basel have now shown in a study that regular caffeine intake can change the gray matter of the brain. However, the effect appears to be temporary. No question - caffeine helps most of us to feel more alert.